The Great Doughnut Parade
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The Great Doughnut Parade

by Rebecca Bond
     
 

Just where is small Billy going? Why does he have a doughnut tied to his belt? Does he know he is being followed by, first, a hen (with a cluck, cluck, cluck), then a cat (all quiet and slinky), and, farther down Main Street, a band . . . and firemen? Then sign painters . . . brick layers . . . even cloud catchers! Author/illustrator Rebecca Bond reveals the truly

Overview

Just where is small Billy going? Why does he have a doughnut tied to his belt? Does he know he is being followed by, first, a hen (with a cluck, cluck, cluck), then a cat (all quiet and slinky), and, farther down Main Street, a band . . . and firemen? Then sign painters . . . brick layers . . . even cloud catchers! Author/illustrator Rebecca Bond reveals the truly marvelous things that can happen when a doughnut is tied up with string.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The poetic text reads well aloud…watercolor figures are fluid and dynamic…Bond is…talented, but this is not her best effort.
School Library Journal

"Preschoolers will enjoy the simple rhyme and the lively ink-and-watercolor pictures of the uproarious parade..." Booklist 10/01/07 Booklist, ALA

"Bond's...watercolors are kinetic and limber...Children will have fun tracing the promenaders' progress in Bond's lively excursion." PW Starred 9/24/07 Publishers Weekly, Starred

"Bond's delicate watercolors, and her nicely rhyming lines, make this a striking debut effort." Orlando Sentinel, 11/25/07 Orlando Sentinel

Children's Literature - Hazel Buys
Like the "Twelve Days of Christmas," Billy starts out with a simple idea, one doughnut, and ends with a cacophony of noise and rhythmic movement through the streets of his town. The charm of this story is its whimsy and language. Billy's riotous journey takes on the spontaneous spirit of an unplanned excursion, the explosive joy of a wonderful joke blended with a tumbling, absurd cast of characters that come bursting out of the recesses and corners of the town to join the parade. The undulating text is supported by the visual harmonies of the vibrant watercolor illustrations. This interplay is well coordinated, displaying a subtle restraint that moves the story forward without losing control of the energetic cast of characters. The possibility that even a small child can put great things into motion is elegantly observed. That the results of these actions are sometimes unknown to us is both roguish and mythic. It is no accident that the small protagonist's costume is suggestive of a super-hero. This picture book offers, on one level, fun in both reading and listening. On another level, it suggests elementary discussions about the consequences of our actions appropriate to a primary school classroom or library reading program. Reviewer: Hazel Buys
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
A boy strolls down a street with a tasty doughnut tied to his belt. The goody, which trails enticingly behind him, attracts a hen that " . . . fancied herself a crumb of this thing." Soon they're joined by a cat, a dog, a little girl, and finally her costumed friends, who've been putting on a play. Before long, the doughnut parade has grown to include figures real (farm animals, firemen) and imagined (Mother Goose characters and "cloud catchers" with large nets). Then the boy's unexpected move results in a quiet conclusion. The poetic text reads well aloud ("And so followed Mabel, their Saturday sitter,/And Adelaide Bead, who'd been doing her hair"), and the watercolor figures are fluid and dynamic. However, the story lacks the spark and the inner logic of the most inspired silliness. Bond is a talented author/illustrator, but this is not her best effort.
—Lauralyn PerssonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
The Great Parade begins accidentally with a doughnut tied onto Billy's belt with a string, presumably to free his hands to carry his big birthday box on a cross-town journey. Hen, fancying a doughnut crumb, trails him hopefully. When a cat follows Hen, and a dressed-up dog follows the cat, a veritable parade is born: "Now you can imagine all the confusion / when somewhere on Main Street they picked up a band- / all noisy and joyful and jolly and gleaming, / all beaming with pleasure like this had been planned." Bond's delightful poetry rolls off the tongue, gaining momentum with the ever-growing parade. In old-fashioned, elegant watercolor paintings, red-cheeked villagers in circus-like garb (along with a few nursery-rhyme characters) traipse across roomy seas of cream-colored paper, often sneaking into the left side of the spread or running off the opposite page. A "piled-up spectacle" ensues when Billy stops, ducks behind a tree and makes his way to where he was going in the first place-the beach, to sail his new toy sailboat: "And all afternoon, as the bay bluely gleamed, / this Billy set sail and happily dreamed." (He eats the doughnut, too!) (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618777051
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/01/2007
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
4 - 3 Years

Meet the Author

REBECCA BOND grew up in the tiny village of Peacham in northeastern Vermont. When she is not having fun painting and writing, Rebecca is busy fixing up her new (to her) old house in a neighborhood in Jamaica Plain, Boston.

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