The Great Filth: The War Against Disease in Victorian England

The Great Filth: The War Against Disease in Victorian England

by Stephen Halliday
     
 

In the early years of Queen Victoria's reign, cholera, typhoid, smallpox, and typhus were responsible for tens of thousands of deaths among rich and poor alike, but by the year of her own death, 1901, these scourges were themselves dead or dying and no longer a source of constant fear. Childbed fever, which killed a steady and increasing number of mothers throughout…  See more details below

Overview

In the early years of Queen Victoria's reign, cholera, typhoid, smallpox, and typhus were responsible for tens of thousands of deaths among rich and poor alike, but by the year of her own death, 1901, these scourges were themselves dead or dying and no longer a source of constant fear. Childbed fever, which killed a steady and increasing number of mothers throughout the century, would shortly join them as an unlamented relic of the past, as would scarlet fever. Stephen Halliday's new book is the story of how these battles were won by a small and fierce group of midwives, doctors, nurses, scientists, social reformers and engineers, who, in the face of opposition from politicians, taxpayers, and, very often, the leaders of their own professions, fought to make Britain's cities safe places to live.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A wealth of engaging detail."  —Guardian

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780752461755
Publisher:
The History Press
Publication date:
04/01/2011
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Halliday is the author of The Great Stink of London and Newgate.

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