The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog!

The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog!

5.0 2
by Cynthia Rylant, Mark Teague
     
 

Gracie has been a good dog every single day of her life. That is, until some noisy painters arrive. When she barks at them for causing a racket, she is put outside. So she decides to go for a walk. The painters, the neighbors, and the garbage man all run after her. She can¹t figure out why . . . so she keeps running. Soon, the whole town joins in. Stop that dog!…  See more details below

Overview

Gracie has been a good dog every single day of her life. That is, until some noisy painters arrive. When she barks at them for causing a racket, she is put outside. So she decides to go for a walk. The painters, the neighbors, and the garbage man all run after her. She can¹t figure out why . . . so she keeps running. Soon, the whole town joins in. Stop that dog! It¹s the great Gracie chase!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Gracie Rose is a very good dog. She's also a very quiet dog-until noisy house painters invade her home. She barks (very politely) to tell them to go away, but in a complete miscarriage of justice, she's put outside. She's so angry she decides to break the rules and take a walk by herself. When she's discovered missing, a madcap chase involving half the neighborhood begins, ending when Gracie walks back home-all by herself. The illustrations have a round, comfortable, slightly off-kilter feel, and Gracie's facial expressions are humorous and telling. Children will like the idea of presenting the story from the dog's point of view, and older ones, as well as adults, will appreciate the more absurd aspects of the tale: when the fish that lives at Gracie's house seems lonely, Gracie sings to it. -Marta Segal
--Booklist, January 1, 2001

Gracie Rose, a charming brown-and-white puppy, loves a quiet house. She loves the kitty sleeping quietly on the windowsill. She sings to the fish when it's lonely. She helps the bigger dog watch the house. For Gracie, the best home is a quiet one. But one day, the painters who come to paint her kitchen destroy the quiet. Not only are they noisy, but they put her out of the house when she barks at them. Gracie, who has always been a good dog runs through an open gate and takes off. The whole town runs after her, gathering much as do the folks in " The Gingerbread Boy." Only when everyone, including the painters, drops from exhaustion can Gracie retrn to her home and find peace and quiet. Unfortunately for Gracie Rose, the reader knows that the dreaded painters will come again. Rylant's story seems deceptively simple, but its prose is beautifully phrased, conversational in tone, and easy to read. Teague outdoes himself here, his oversized drawings are equal partners to Rylant's words. The create narrative, movement, and fun on every page, Gracie often seems ready to leap from the page, as she becomes bigger than life. The small town is an idealized place where a multiethnic community comes together good-humoredly to protect a fellow creature. Humans and animals express a variety of emotions, but Gracie's face and body language as the painter puts her outside take the cake. The strong storyline in text and illustration makes this a fine read-aloud. Gracie Rose deserves a series!
Kirkus Reviews, Feb. 1, 2001--starred review

Gracie is a "little round dog" who likes her restrained and familiar surroundings: "For Gracie, a quiet home was the best home." She's therefore considerably discomfited when painter arrive and set everything askew, with their "clangy ladders and big-person voices!" Their response is to put the noisy little dog outside, whereupon she starts to take a walk by herself; when she's spotted leaving, the pursuit begins, with eventually the whole town joining in The Great Gracie Chase. The text doesn't always make sense (why would Gracie still think of her outing as a walk whe she knows she's running away from people trying to catch her?), and it occasionally has a slightly precious air (especially with direct addresses to the reader such as "Do you know what?"), but th story of the baffled little dog's eluding of her pursuers remains enjoyable. Teague's compositions never quite give the group chase its frenetic due, but he creates a round and pettable world enhanced by unusual perspectives ranging from dog's eye to overhead (the latter revealing a blimp apparently following along with the chase). The art adds some entertaining intems to the pursuit (bicycle wheels flying off from the speed, concerned onlookers observing through windows), and Gracie herself is a solidly endearing armful of brown-and-white pup. If you've got kids ready for a little canine chaos, this might just go the distance.
---Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, March 2001

This simple story is a delight

Children's Literature
Gracie is a normally well-behaved dog pushed to her limit in this simple yet meaningful story. Rylant's title character (named after her own dog) is displaced by house painters who put her outdoors but who also leave the front gate open, encouraging her to strike out on her own. The entire town ends up chasing her, but Gracie goes home when she's good and ready. Teague's whimsical pictures tell the story from a dog's-eye (read: kid's-eye) view, as giant trucks and looming adults threaten Gracie. Any child who's ever done something to upset the applecart will identify with the title pooch, and the quiet, happy ending will reassure kids that no matter what kind of sound and fury results from misbehavior, you really CAN go home again. 2001, The Blue Sky Press/Scholastic, . Ages 2 to 5. Reviewer: Donna Freedman
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-This simple story is a delight. Gracie Rose, a little round dog, lives with a cat, a bigger dog, and a goldfish. This charming canine loves peace and quiet and is always well behaved, until the day the noisy painters arrive. When she barks in annoyance, she's the one put outside and once there, she takes a walk all by herself. A comic chase ensues and soon a diverse group of animals and townspeople are tailing after Gracie across the entire town. The pursuers finally halt when their energy runs out and the perky pup returns home to relish the quiet again. In the hands of Rylant and Teague, this basic event has charm, humor, and joy. The full-page illustrations incorporate the text and convey a droll situation with `50s-style acrylic cartoonlike characters and background. A runaway success for storyhour.-Beth Tegart, Oneida City Schools, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Gracie Rose, a charming brown-and-white puppy, loves a quiet house. She loves the kitty sleeping quietly on the windowsill. She sings to the fish when it's lonely. She helps the bigger dog watch the house. For Gracie, the best home is a quiet one. But one day, the painters who come to paint her kitchen destroy the quiet. Not only are they noisy, but they put her out of the house when she barks at them. Gracie, who has always been a good dog, runs through an open gate and takes off. The whole town runs after her, gathering much as do the folks in "The Gingerbread Boy." Only when everyone, including the painters, drops from exhaustion can Gracie return to her home and find peace and quiet. Unfortunately for Gracie Rose, the reader knows that the dreaded painters will come again. Rylant's story seems deceptively simple, but its prose is beautifully phrased, conversational in tone, and easy to read. Teague outdoes himself here; his oversized drawings are equal partners to Rylant's words. They create narrative, movement, and fun on every page; Gracie often seems ready to leap from the page, as she becomes bigger than life. The small town is an idealized place where a multiethnic community comes together good-humoredly to protect a fellow creature. Humans and animals express a variety of emotions, but Gracie's face and body language as the painter puts her outside take the cake. The strong storyline in text and illustration makes this a fine read-aloud. Gracie Rose deserves a series! (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590100410
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/28/2001
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
123,683
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD410L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


As a child in West Virginia, Cynthia Rylant never dreamed of becoming a writer. In her free time, she devoured Archie comic books and paperback romances and enjoyed the outdoors. But after taking one college English class, she was, “hooked on great writing… I didn’t know about this part of me until I went to college-didn’t know I loved beautiful stories.” And one night, inspired by the Southern writer James Agee, she sat down and wrote When I Was Young in the Mountains. Named a Caldecott Honor Book and an ALA Notable Book, it was an instant success.

Since that night, Rylant hasn’t stopped creating wonderful books. Her stories explore friendship, love, grief, and other mysteries, and often draw on her memories of growing up in Appalachia. “I get a lot of personal gratification thinking of those people who don’t get any attention in the world and making them really valuable in my fiction-making them absolutely shine with their beauty.”

She lives with her many pets in the Pacific Northwest.

Mark Teague is an award-winning children's book author and illustrator whose books include the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling How Do Dinosaurs... series, the LaRue series, FIREHOUSE!, FUNNY FARM, and many other humorous picture books. Mark lives in New York state with his wife and their two daughters.

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The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My kids love this book! Its so good they ask me to read it to them every night!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I fell in love with this book the moment I first read it. The illustration on the jacket just invites you to pick it up, and the illustrations throughout the book are bright, colorful, engaging, and great fun. Mark Teague gives Gracie so much personality! It is a truly enchanting story by Cynthia Rylant, and If I were on the selection committee, this book would definitely be a contender for the Caldecott. This is a must have for any lover of picture books.