The Greatest Story Ever Told [Explicit Lyrics]

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - David Jeffries
The pre-release hype for The Greatest Story Ever Told claimed the album would find David Banner "connecting on a larger scale," with "social commentary at its finest" being the heart of the album. On the opening "So Long," the underappreciated rapper connects and offers compelling commentary at a furious rate, whipping through topics such as 9/11, the shooting of Sean Bell, and the war on Iraq before landing on the apathy he sees everywhere: "This is Banner's middle finger!" is aimed not just at the oppressors but the generation that won't fight back, all done over a Get Cool 3000 production that's as busy, layered, and fascinating as the track's lyrics. This promising ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - David Jeffries
The pre-release hype for The Greatest Story Ever Told claimed the album would find David Banner "connecting on a larger scale," with "social commentary at its finest" being the heart of the album. On the opening "So Long," the underappreciated rapper connects and offers compelling commentary at a furious rate, whipping through topics such as 9/11, the shooting of Sean Bell, and the war on Iraq before landing on the apathy he sees everywhere: "This is Banner's middle finger!" is aimed not just at the oppressors but the generation that won't fight back, all done over a Get Cool 3000 production that's as busy, layered, and fascinating as the track's lyrics. This promising opener gives way to an album that never dips below good, and often borders on excellent, but it's almost as if two very different full-lengths were mixed together. Greatest Story never figures out how to mix Banner's brave new world with the comfortable tracks it falls back on, allowing listeners to bail whenever they feel like it and undermining his apathy argument in the process. When the brilliant rebirth of "G.S.E.T. Intro" gives way to the predictable club track "Suicide Doors," it diminishes the power of both. Even more unbelievable is how "A Girl" offers the unsettling "Do you like it when I grab your neck?/And squeeze it til your face turn blue?/Could you please come and sign this waiver/If pass out girl you can't sue" a female voice answers all these questions with a "Yeah Daddy", and then "Syrup Sipping" gets deep and ponders how "we then subliminally became what they think we are anyway." Banner is a complex man who skillfully testifies in front of Congress on the most dangerous of issues -- the impact of gangsta rap lyrics -- and his ability to balance his intelligence with his brutish side is what has made his previous albums so memorable. Here his Hulk half brings the topical "wake up America" message to a halt, creating an experience that's beyond frustrating. Dismantle, reconstruct, then split, and The Greatest Story Ever Told earns decent marks -- it's just hard not to focus on the handful of cuts that point to what could have been.
Billboard - Mikael Wood
The extremes offer up a portrait of a man far more complex than what we get from many of Banner's peers, and the inventive beats (by Banner, Cool & Dre, Akon and others) add vital life to his gruff flow.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 7/15/2008
  • Label: Motown
  • UPC: 602517467545
  • Catalog Number: 000995602
  • Sales rank: 99,464

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 So Long (3:42)
  2. 2 G.S.E.T. Intro (1:29)
  3. 3 Suicide Doors (4:14)
  4. 4 Speaker - Akon (4:07)
  5. 5 T.I. Speaks (Interlude) (2:10)
  6. 6 Get Like Me - Yung Joc (3:44)
  7. 7 Shawty Say (3:38)
  8. 8 A Girl (3:15)
  9. 9 Syrup Sipping (1:07)
  10. 10 Hold On - Marcus (4:42)
  11. 11 Cadillac on 22's, Pt. 2 (4:18)
  12. 12 Uncle Swac (Interlude) (3:47)
  13. 13 I Get By (3:24)
  14. 14 Freedom (Interlude) (1:03)
  15. 15 B.A.N. (The Love Song) (4:31)
  16. 16 Point 'Em to the Door - Jim Jones (4:25)
  17. 17 Marz (1:09)
  18. 18 Ball with Me (3:25)
  19. 19 K.O. (3:29)
  20. 20 Fly (3:10)
  21. 21 Faith (3:37)
  22. 22 [Untitled] (7:17)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
David Banner Primary Artist
Roxanne Estrada Background Vocals
3mcclaingirls! Background Vocals
Derrick "Young World" McAlister Keyboards
Tiffani Tyre Background Vocals
Technical Credits
John Frye Engineer
Chris Jackson Engineer
Tom Coyne Mastering
James M. Wisner Engineer
Warryn Campbell Programming, Producer
Lavell Crump Programming, Producer
David Banner Audio Production
Chris Carmouche Engineer
Bruce Buechner Engineer
Joe Spix Art Direction
Aliaune "Akon" Thiam Programming, Producer
Davel "Bo" McKenzie Programming, Producer
Kori Anders Engineer
Travis Daniels Engineer
Denny Ogle Engineer
Vickie Charles Publicity
William Durst Engineer
Corey Anders Engineer
Justin Marchan Engineer
Roberto Caiaffa Marketing
Kevin Cross Engineer
Get Cool 3000 Programming, Producer
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    The Longest If Not the Greatest Story Banner Has Ever Told

    David Banner represents a new breed of overtly racist Southern gangstah rap. Think of Malcolm X's most vitriolic and inciting speech and you will get somewhere in the ballpark of what's to be expected from Banner's garden variety statement on race relations in the US. Banner, who is not satisfied with the path blazed and pace set by the likes of Malcolm X, had to go far back in US history to find a person he is comfortable associating with, a slave rebellion leader, Nat Turner, who is best known for spurring on his followers with a "kill all whites" exhortation. <BR/><BR/>This is so much as goes for Banner's political statement. The rest is the run-of-the-mill lyrical content of gangstah rap which covers ghetto life, being poor, coming up in the world of gangstah rap, bragging about being rich, explicitly describing sexual acts between a subservient female and an alpha male. <BR/><BR/>This might not sound like anything anyone should encourage by buying this type of products, and yet it is more or less standard gangstah rap and it is selling like eggnog on Christmas morning. <BR/><BR/>Banner's beat and lyrical content display what seems to be an inexhaustible reservoir of pent-up anger which is highly addictive and most appropriate for those days when it creates a safe harbor of anger for those of us who feel like getting out on the street and clobbering someone in frustration. <BR/><BR/>This particular album isn't Banner's best product by any stretch of imagination. It is perhaps one of his least noteworthy efforts. First, in creating this record, Banner seemed to have been motivated by the principle that no song is bad enough to be left out. This has resulted in a 22-track record which feels like a never-ending story (this naturally fits the title of the album quite well, provided by "greatest" Banner meant "largest" or "longest"). Some of these tracks have beats that are so ill-conceived that it is impossible to tell whether it is the background noise coming into Banner's recording studio from the street or an actual beat written to that particular lyric. In this category the particularly painful tracks are Cadillac on 22's Part Two, F*** You Hoes, Marz, and K.O.<BR/><BR/>Perhaps, the biggest redeemer of this album is a track called 9 MM which features Snoop Dogg and Akon. In many ways this track is a cut-and-paste from Dogg's Convict Music which appeared on the Blue Carpet Treatment and other lines Dogg which have defined Dogg in the last decade or so. Great as this song is one might catch oneself thinking while enjoying it if this is Banner's contribution to this song he or she is particularly appreciating. A Girl is an incredibly dynamic track with, perhaps, some of the most explicit and descriptive sex lyrics rap music has ever produced. Fly and Faith toward the end of the album are not bad either. Faith provides a great introspective look into the life of a rural Southern drug dealer-turn-rapper as it displays the insecurities of a small town youngster going into a big city.<BR/><BR/>The expectation of a great social commentary projected in the Editorial to this album has definitely not transpired. Banner is far angrier and far more explicit about his surroundings and race relations in this country than most other rappers, but if you are looking for a lengthy and in-depth treatise on race relations, buy a book on the subject. Banner's views of the social issues of choice are although highly entertaining remain the views of

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