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The Greek Myths: Combined Edition
     

The Greek Myths: Combined Edition

4.0 3
by Robert Graves
 

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Combines in a single volume the complete text of the definitive two-volume classic, citing all the ancient myths.

@GoldenFarce Good, the gals stand outside my house all the time. The constant chanting is creepy, but all agree: Jason crossing the line!

When he gets home we’ll talk. I’m sure we can work it out. But what’s the best

Overview

Combines in a single volume the complete text of the definitive two-volume classic, citing all the ancient myths.

@GoldenFarce Good, the gals stand outside my house all the time. The constant chanting is creepy, but all agree: Jason crossing the line!

When he gets home we’ll talk. I’m sure we can work it out. But what’s the best way to approach this? Any advice, anyone? #wackrelationships

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140171990
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1993
Edition description:
Complete Edition
Pages:
784
Product dimensions:
5.46(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.22(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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The Greek Myths: Combined Edition 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a very helpful read,i have always been interseted in Greek mythology.This book is excellent for helping students in their research and is considered as a reference book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robert Graves' 'Greek Myths' is an innovative review of Greek mythology. The book provides compiled summaries for each main Greek hero and deity. Graves then provides his own evaluation as to the anthropological origins of the myths in the context of early Greek civilization. His focus is primarily on Minoan and pre-Mycenean civilizations. Through etymology and historical analysis, Graves contends that Greek mythology evolved from the merging of two distinct cultures and religious practices. Graves argues that female godesses such as Hera, Diane, Athena, Hecate, etc., originated from early pre-Greek matriarchal/amazonian societies. Graves contends that each godess represents the same triad of maiden, woman, and crone, paralleling both lunar and harvest cycles. Graves argues that myths such as the castration of Kronos and the labors of Herakles are derived from amazonian rituals of using mock-kings as sacrificial victims in harvest/fertility rituals. Such mock-kings, Graves concludes, were sacrificed at the end of a harvest/lunar ritual by the Amazon Queen. Graves suggests that the traditional patriarchal triad of Zeus, Hades, and Poseidon was introduced later when the Myceneans invaded Greece and conquered these matriarchies. Overall, the book offers a direction of study that would be useful in corroborating a facinating theory about societies in Ancient Greece and how their evolution was presented through mythology. Unfortunately, as is usual with virtually any myth, the reason events usually become mythical is because there were few hard facts left behind to corroborate the truth that lies behind them. Graves' exclusive reliance on etymological and literary analysis to reach his conclusions restrains his logic more to conjecture as opposed to cogent inductive reasoning (e.g. This city's name in greek means horse, Homer refers to the Trojan horse with the same word, therefore, this City was populated by Trojans.) Despite the frail physical evidence for his theory, Graves provides an interesting direction for further study.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago