The Halloween Forest

The Halloween Forest

by Marion Dane Bauer, John Shelley
     
 

If you take your trick-or-treat sack and venture into the dark woods on Halloween night, you'll find cat bones, rat bones, and bat bones - and all are looking at YOU!

"Take care! Beware! Despair! the bone creatures cry. "You can bet you've just met your worst nightmare!" What will you do? Cry? Sigh? NO! Because you're too tough / to worry about stuff / like the

Overview

If you take your trick-or-treat sack and venture into the dark woods on Halloween night, you'll find cat bones, rat bones, and bat bones - and all are looking at YOU!

"Take care! Beware! Despair! the bone creatures cry. "You can bet you've just met your worst nightmare!" What will you do? Cry? Sigh? NO! Because you're too tough / to worry about stuff / like the rattle / and prattle / of bones!

Told in unmetered rhymed verse, this Halloween adventure is a real treat.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A child makes a Halloween journey in this evocative story with genuinely chilling illustrations. Leaving town by moonlight, the girl discovers a “forest of bones,” filled with skeletons: “Bat bones, cat bones, rat bones, and all are looking at you.” Using pen and India ink, Shelley constructs spidery bone trees, densely populated with skeletal creatures that scamper and hang upside-down. While the bones cry out “Take care! Beware! Despair!” Bauer underscores the girl’s bravery and power as she banishes the bones (and nets a haul of candy). The nightmarish aesthetic touches on how a child’s perception is shaped by imagination, especially on a spooky night. Ages 4–8. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Suzanna E. Henshon
Have you ever dreamed of having a fantastic, spooky Halloween adventure? This entertaining story opens with the line, "Have you ever thrown your trick-or-treat sack on your back on all Hallow's Eve and taken your leave of town?" After dashing out of town, the reader finds a forest filled with bones—bare bones of trees, bat bones, cat bones, and rat bones, which stare down. The reader also sees dog bones, hog bones, frog bones, and even fog bones. The bones are every child's worst nightmare, but the reader does not sigh, cry, or dash away in dismay. No, the reader does not worry about rattling bones. Instead, she cries, "Poo!" and "Booh!" in response. The reader wiggles and squiggles her bones before yelling out, "Trick or treat! Smell my feet! Give me something good to eat!" At the end of this delicious story, the reader collects a bag of wonderful candy. Young readers will love being a character in this interactive tale by Newbery Honor writer, Marion Bauer; they will also enjoy the finely crafted illustrations by John Shelley.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—In this creepy Halloween tale, a trick-or-treater leaves the safety of town on All Hallow's Eve to find treats in a forest of bones. Bat, cat, and rat bones crawl among tree bones. The illustrations capture the spooky feel while not straying too far into the scary, though this title is better shared with school-age children. The text is sometimes awkward. Some pages have a more solid rhythm than others, but there doesn't seem to be a consistent pattern or rhyme. A few odd details such as "fog bones" add to the confused feeling of the book. Purchase where Halloween books are in demand.—Laura Stanfield, Campbell County Public Library, Ft. Thomas, KY
Kirkus Reviews
Veteran Bauer sends an intrepid trick-or-treater into a deliciously creepy forest full of fantastical frights and rattling menaces. Any child with a sense of adventure, keen eye and touch of courage will eagerly follow the unmetered rhyming text that takes this black-caped child deep into a forest of bones on Halloween. The verse propels both the character and readers forward through each taunting spread. "Bat bones, / cat bones, / rat bones and all are / looking at / YOU." "Take care! / Beware! / Despair! / You can bet / you've just met / your worst nightmare!" But the observant explorer carefully sidesteps such scariness and instead shouts " ‘BOO!' / or ‘POOH!' / or even ‘WAHOO!' " and then dramatically reveals a skeleton costume underneath the cloak. Now the skeletal creatures turn from frightening to welcoming as the child raises a bright orange sack declaring, "Trick or treat! / Smell my feet! / Give me something / good to eat!" Shelley's superbly detailed illustrations in pen, India ink and watercolor help build suspense as the child goes from the city into the intricately twining bony landscape. A dusky palette dominated by grays and muted pastels turns brighter when the child's spunky confidence is revealed. Elegantly designed, this collaboration shows a great respect for children's sensibilities regarding the fine lines between fear, fun and bravery. This title should be at the top of the book pile come autumn. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823423248
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,239,757
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD570L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

MARION DANE BAUER has written more than 80 children's books, including picture books, easy readers, early chapter books, and novels. She won a Newbery Honor for On My Honor, a middle grade coming-of-age story. She lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. Visit her website at www.mariondanebauer.com.

John Shelley began his illustration career in London, his first picture book being shortlisted for the Mother Goose Award. From 1987 he lived in Tokyo, where his work has been used in everything from advertising to character merchandising and editorial, while his children's book illustrations have been published in countries around the globe.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >