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The Hammer: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress
     

The Hammer: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress

3.0 3
by Lou Dubose, Jan Reid, Lou DuBose
 
A lively, hard-hitting biography of the pro-business, pro-Jesus, anti-government, anti-environment House majority leader who is driving today's congressional agenda.

With The Hammer, Lou Dubose and Jan Reid track the rise of Tom DeLay from owner of a pest control business to unremarkable, and hard-partying, Texas legislator (his nickname was "Hot Tub Tom"),

Overview

A lively, hard-hitting biography of the pro-business, pro-Jesus, anti-government, anti-environment House majority leader who is driving today's congressional agenda.

With The Hammer, Lou Dubose and Jan Reid track the rise of Tom DeLay from owner of a pest control business to unremarkable, and hard-partying, Texas legislator (his nickname was "Hot Tub Tom"), to the congressional pinnacle of power. DeLay is the representative who has called the Environmental Protection Agency "the Gestapo of government," that he drove what he dubbed "The Campaign" to impeach Bill Clinton because Clinton lacked a "biblical worldview," that he didn't serve in Vietnam because too many minorities had signed up leaving no room for people like him, and recently stated any House adoption of a revised bill reinstating tax credits for poor families "ain't going to happen." DeLay is bold—a majority leader with extraordinary powers and extraordinary ambition—and whether he is maneuvering to redistrict Texas congressional seats or flying to Israel to critique the president, he uses that power to shape our politics here and abroad. It is time a proper introduction was made to this man, the only member of the House to keep half a dozen bullwhips on his office wall and a copy of the Ten Commandments on the windowsill.

Author Biography: Lou Dubose is the co-author, with Molly Ivins, of Bushwhacked: Life in George W. Bush's America and Shrub: The Short But Happy Political Life of George W. Bush. He was the editor of the Texas Observer for eleven years. Jan Reid is an award-winning novelist and a senior writer for Texas Monthly. His most recent book is a much-praised memoir of Texas and Mexico, The Bullet Meant for Me, and, with Dubose and Carl M. Cannon, Boy Genius: Karl Rove, the Brains Behind the Remarkable Political Triumph of George W. Bush.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this critical biography, veteran Texas journalists Dubose and Reid tell the story of the boy from Sugarland, Tex., who rose from smalltown exterminator to majority leader of the House of Representatives, earning the nickname "the Hammer" along the way. All the major episodes of DeLay's career are vividly covered: his rise through the House ranks, the coup against Speaker Newt Gingrich, how DeLay built his formidable fund-raising operation and (allegedly) bullied the lobbyists of K Street into towing the GOP party line, his alliance with right-wing Zionists (Christian and Jewish), and his disdain for Bill Clinton. The book is written from a progressive perspective, and the authors do not engage in substantive policy discussions about the merits of DeLay's ideas. There is no examination, for example, of the literature on the efficacy of government regulation-Dubose and Reid simply assume that Delay's hardcore deregulation position is bad. For them, the House under Delay is "no longer a deliberative body" but rather functions as a "plebiscitary" system that merely rubber-stamps the wishes of the Republican leadership. They do, however, affirm that DeLay's positions are sincerely held-that he is a "conviction politician" who may be cynical about process but not about substance. (Sept. 28) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
When Tom DeLay was a back-bencher in the Texas legislature, his nickname was "Hot Tub Tom" in recognition of his swinging lifestyle and relaxed approach to government duties. Today, as majority leader of the U.S. House of Representatives, he's known as "The Hammer." This book traces DeLay's route from low-profile state legislator to powerful congressional leader, taking note of his hostility toward government regulations, adoption of born-again Christianity, role in the Gingrich revolution, and continued importance during the Bush administration. DuBose (editor of the Texas Observer) and Reid (coauthor, Boy Genius: Karl Rove) examine DeLay's fund-raising talents and excesses, his innovative efforts to manipulate lobbyists, and his skills in maintaining control of every important piece of legislation before the House of Representatives. The book offers an excellent primer on the evolution of political fund-raising, especially Political Action Committees and the manipulation of campaign finance reform rules. For readers intrigued by the ways politicians acquire and use power, this book will provide many hours of delightful reading. The documentation is slight, since the authors depended largely on their own reporting, but numerous attributions to news sources instill credibility. Recommended for public libraries and academic libraries with large political science collections.-Jill Ortner, SUNY at Buffalo Libs. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586482381
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
09/27/2004
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.42(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.25(d)

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The Hammer: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I THOUGHT THIS BOOK WAS VERY MUCH WORTH READING. THIS IS REALLY AN EVIL MAN WHO WILL STOP AT NOTHING TO GET AHEAD. EXCELLENT READING!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Total left-wing bias. Can hardly be considered an objective presentation of the man, the myth, and the legend that is Tom DeLay.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an okay read. The authors loath Tom Delay, and they're entitled to their beliefs, but they occassionally get in the way of the narrative. It's probably not worth buying; read it at your local library. As far as scoundrels go, Tom Delay is the king, no question about it.