The Head Negro in Charge Syndrome: The Dead End of Black Politics

Overview

Al Sharpton's entrance into the 2004 Democratic presidential race is evidence of a decaying black political culture where ego trumps politics. It is the last gasp of a tradition that has been transformed over a generation from bold, effective and results-oriented politics to rhetoric and symbolism, argues crime writer and social commentator Norman Kelley. As Kelley shows, what Sharpton covets is the sobriquet—The Head Negro in Charge (HNIC), a symbolic political mobilization that replaces effective politics and ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $58.77   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(218)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Al Sharpton's entrance into the 2004 Democratic presidential race is evidence of a decaying black political culture where ego trumps politics. It is the last gasp of a tradition that has been transformed over a generation from bold, effective and results-oriented politics to rhetoric and symbolism, argues crime writer and social commentator Norman Kelley. As Kelley shows, what Sharpton covets is the sobriquet—The Head Negro in Charge (HNIC), a symbolic political mobilization that replaces effective politics and organizing. "The HNIC syndrome has seen the rise of symbolic leaders—Jesse Jackson, Louis Farrakhan, Sharpton and now Russell Simmons—who may be charismatic," Kelley writes, "but are politically unaccountable to the very people they claim to represent, namely African Americans. The transformation has been underway since the 1970s, but most African Americans have yet to confront it." HNIC syndrome is both a symptom and response to the failings of black political and cultural orthodoxy, of a sclerotic black elite represented by the NAACP and the Black Congressional Caucus, who have embedded themselves into the machinery of the Democratic Party and the conservative movement.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This is a strong, critical examination of black political and intellectual leadership in the post-civil rights era. According to crime writer and journalist Kelley, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and Cornel West, among others, suffer from the HNIC (Head Negro in Charge) syndrome, a condition in which self-appointed black "leaders" are more interested in getting attention for themselves, and being seen as leaders, than in legitimately trying to improve the lives of African Americans through public policy and economic development initiatives. Such leadership without political accountability is a change from a generation ago, says Kelley, who also singles out the Democratic Party and black elected officials for taking the black vote for granted. For more accountability, Kelley recommends strategic nonvoting-blacks organized to withhold their votes from ineffective candidates in regions where blacks are a cohesive voting bloc that Democrats rely on. Kelley's tone and presentation is that of an astute and informed citizen willing to shake up the system to make it better. Refreshing and readable, this original work is suitable for public and academic libraries.-Sherri L. Barnes, Univ. of California Lib., Santa Barbara Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781560255840
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • Publication date: 6/9/2004
  • Series: Nation Books
  • Edition description: First Trade Paper Edition
  • Pages: 246
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The head negro in charge syndrome and the man who would be Jesse (aka Scampaign 2004) 21
Ch. 2 Follow the leaders? the death of effective black politics 45
Ch. 3 The roots of symbolic politics, 1965-1975 : the rise and fall of black power nationalism 83
Ch. 4 The politics and economics of soul power, or "good-foot" capitalism and black America's rhythm nation 117
Ch. 5 Notes on the niggarati - or, why dead white men still rule 137
Ch. 6 The politics of electoral instability : black voters and strategic non-voting 167
Postscript : Scampaign 2004 193
President's urban strategy (cisneros memo) 199
Ten things that could be done to revitalize black politics 213
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)