Heart of the Matter

The Heart of the Matter

2.5 2
by Jane Monheit
     
 
A technically proficient singer with a distinctive style that straddles the line between Ella Fitzgerald's extroverted, loosely swinging approach and Linda Eder's more restrained Broadway and cabaret style, Jane Monheit is a virtuoso. One minute she's dazzling you with her resonant bebop-ready chops and the

Overview

A technically proficient singer with a distinctive style that straddles the line between Ella Fitzgerald's extroverted, loosely swinging approach and Linda Eder's more restrained Broadway and cabaret style, Jane Monheit is a virtuoso. One minute she's dazzling you with her resonant bebop-ready chops and the next she's making you cry with a single verse of a ballad. On her ninth studio album, 2013's Heart of the Matter, Monheit brings all of her gifts to bear on a set of mature, heartfelt songs that rank among her best. The album also works as a companion piece to 2009's The Lovers, the Dreamers and Me. With that album, Monheit celebrated such milestones as the birth of her son Jack and turning 30. She then followed up with 2010's equally as compelling if more swinging and straight-ahead jazz-sounding Home. Heart of the Matter, with its ruminations on motherhood and fidelity, returns Monheit to the more intimate, contemporary pop sound of The Lovers, the Dreamers and Me. Working with producer/arranger Gil Goldstein (who also adds his lyrical accordion sound to several tracks) and her usual rhythm section of drummer Rick Montalbano (her husband), pianist Michael Kanan, and bassist Neal Miner, Monheit has crafted a sumptuous, immaculately arranged album that once again shines a light on her immense vocal talent. Whether she's framed by a lush orchestral backing on the bossa nova "Depende de Nós" or a spare electric piano and flute arrangement on "Two Lonely People," Heart of the Matter finds Monheit nestled deep into the pocket of her own cross-genre sound, and it's a warm place to be.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/16/2013
Label:
Emarcy
UPC:
0602537315888
catalogNumber:
001826802
Rank:
30395

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jane Monheit   Primary Artist,Vocals,Background Vocals
Gil Goldstein   Accordion,Conductor,Electric Piano
Romero Lubambo   Guitar
Richard Locker   Cello
Kathleen Nester   Alto Flute
Sheryl Henze   Bass Flute
Barry Crawford   Alto Flute
Michael Kanan   Piano
Neal Miner   Bass
Rogerio Boccato   Percussion
Rick Montalbano   Drums
Dave Eggar   Cello

Technical Credits

Buffy Sainte-Marie   Composer,Lyricist
Ivan Lins   Composer,Lyricist
Hoagy Carmichael   Composer
John Lennon   Composer,Lyricist
Paul McCartney   Composer,Lyricist
Randy Newman   Composer,Lyricist
Larry Goldings   Composer
Gil Goldstein   Arranger,Producer,Orchestration,Vocal Arrangements
Mel Tormé   Composer,Lyricist
Carol Hall   Composer,Lyricist
Vitor Martins   Composer,Lyricist
Joe Raposo   Composer,Lyricist
Hoffman   Composer,Lyricist
Maurice Sigler   Composer,Lyricist
Jane Brown Thompson   Composer,Lyricist
Mabel Wayne   Composer,Lyricist
Michael Kanan   rhythm arrangement
Jane Monheit   Composer,Lyricist,Vocal Arrangements
Neal Miner   rhythm arrangement
Charlie Kramsky   Engineer
Paulo Pinheiro   Composer,Lyricist
Tyler Hartmann   Engineer
Cliff Goldmember   Composer,Lyricist

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The Heart of the Matter 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
jdschatz More than 1 year ago
I am a big, long-time fan of Jane Monheit; I have every album (except the Christmas one) she has released. My overall favorite is Surrender, although I have many, many individual and multiple favorites from all her other albums.I don't understand how (or why - misguided loyalty?) anyone who has a history with her could possibly like this unexplainable travesty. It almost seems she went out of her way to make an awful album. Many of the cuts are seriously painful to listen to. "Until It's Time For You To Go" is 6 minutes of excruciating torture. Someone at Amazon described it as "music to commit suicide to." Spot on. If anyone advised her on the selections he/she/they should be cut loose. If this were my first exposure to her, it would be my last. Fortunately, I have everything else she has released, so I can treat this as an aberration. Hopefully. When I first got it (with joyful anticipation) when it was first released), I only listened to the first four tracks - because that was all the heartbreak I could tolerate. A few days later I made it past 'A Gente Merece...' (which held some early promise but faded fast when someone stuck the clothespin back on her nose) to half of "Golden Slumbers..." before I had to call another screeching - literally - halt. I held out hope there may be something to salvage in this album. She's much too good to have lost it so fast and so completely. Her phrasing used to be so magical and now it's trite, predictable and painful. So, In June, over a year later, I tried listening to this album again. Who knows, maybe I had been suffering from some type of auditory hallucination and it wasn't really as bad as I had remembered. And it wasn't. It was worse. So, for the first time EVER I deleted an album by someone I still consider one of my favorites. This experience has also caused my to reevaluate my overall impressions of her, and I find I'm listening to her earlier works less often and more critically.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great album, but be aware that the product sold by B&N contains only 12 (not 14) tracks. I returned my copy because it was missing the final two tracks shown in the advertised listing. As far as I can determine, these are bonus tracks which are available only in the Japanese SHM-CD edition. "I Wanna Be With You" is also available from iTunes, but "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life" seems to be offered only in Japan.