Hickory Records Story, Vol. 1

The Hickory Records Story, Vol. 1

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Started by country legend Roy Acuff and songwriter Fred Rose as the recording, and retail, arms of their Acuff-Rose Publishing Company, Hickory Records was primarily a country label, but did branch out into pop and rock on occasion. And thanks to an unerring ability to spot odd crossover material, the label…  See more details below

Overview

Started by country legend Roy Acuff and songwriter Fred Rose as the recording, and retail, arms of their Acuff-Rose Publishing Company, Hickory Records was primarily a country label, but did branch out into pop and rock on occasion. And thanks to an unerring ability to spot odd crossover material, the label actually enjoyed a surprising success on the pop charts in the early- to mid- '60s. The songs on this collection range from the ragged Cajun anthem "Louisiana Man" by brothers Rusty and Doug Kershaw, to the impossibly sappy "Morning Girl" by the Neon Philharmonic. Also included here is the one of a kind classic "Bread and Butter," by the Newbeats, which is as catchy as it is stupid. In all, the label seems to have followed the advice set out in another Hickory hit, "Don't Worry 'Bout the Mule," by Glenn Barber, which implores "don't worry about the mule/just load the wagon." A willingness to take chances and step outside the lines has made Hickory Records an interesting label, but this collection is a little hard to endure at times.

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Product Details

Release Date:
11/06/2001
Label:
Audium Entertainment
UPC:
0684038812721
catalogNumber:
8127

Tracks

  1. Torture
  2. Morning Girl
  3. Playboy  -  Gene & Debbe
  4. Bread and Butter
  5. Country Green  - Don Gibson
  6. Touch the Morning  - Don Gibson
  7. Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)  - Sue Thompson
  8. James (Hold the Ladder Steady)  - Sue Thompson
  9. Louisiana Man  -  Rusty & Doug
  10. Talk Back Trembling Lips  - Ernest Ashworth
  11. No Help Wanted  - Bill Carlisle
  12. Yesterday Just Passed My Way Again
  13. Rings of Gold  - Sue Thompson
  14. The File
  15. Country Girl With Hot Pants On  - Leona Williams
  16. Don't Worry 'Bout the Mule
  17. Wall to Wall Love
  18. There's a Big Wheel  - Stoney Cooper

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Don Gibson   Track Performer
Bob Luman   Track Performer
Sue Thompson   Track Performer
Don Everly   Track Performer
Neon Philharmonic   Track Performer
Bill Carlisle   Track Performer
Newbeats   Track Performer
Wilma Lee Cooper   Track Performer
Glenn Barber   Track Performer
Stoney Cooper   Track Performer
Bob Gallion   Track Performer
Kris Jensen   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Louis Jordan   Composer
Dave Gibson   Composer
Jay Turnbow   Composer
Jeff Chenault   Art Direction
Larry Parks   Composer

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The Hickory Records Story, Vol. 1 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Founded in the mid-¿50s, and run by Wesley Rose, son of Acuff-Rose co-founder, Fred Rose, Hickory was a prime outlet for the publishing company¿s song catalog. The label scored country hits by Roy Acuff, Don Gibson and others, and rounded the bend into the ¿60s by taking on pop acts such as The Newbeats (''Bread and Butter''), Sue Thompson (''James Hold the Ladder Steady''), and British troubadour, Donovan.

The eighteen tracks of volume one combine country and pop, ranging from Doug Kershaw¿s cajun-flavored ''Louisiana Man'' to Neon Philharmonic¿s baroque rock ''Morning Girl.'' Additional highlights include Bill Carlisle¿s hand-clapping ''No Help Wanted,'' Gibson¿s 1971 comeback (and Eddy Raven¿s first songwriting hit) ''Country Green,'' and a quintet of John D. Loudermilk tunes that include Kris Jensen¿s pre-Everly¿s recording of ''Torture'' and Ernie Ashworth¿s crossover hit, ''Talk Back Trembling Lips.''

Absent are tracks from Acuff (recently anthologized by Varese Sarabande), as well as early hits scored by Donovan (which, to be fair, were Pye UK recordings rather than Hickory originals). The liner notes focus more on Acuff-Rose than Hickory itself, and with no real background on the songs and singers, the tracks are left to speak for themselves. But speak they do, in surprising variety and vitality. As one of a handful of long-lived Nashville indies, Hickory¿s catalog of memorable gems makes for great listening.