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The Hidden Door (Explorer Series #3)
     

The Hidden Door (Explorer Series #3)

by Kazu Kibuishi
 

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A bullied boy discovers a door guarded by a sly monster . . . A painting of a door opens in a forgotten Egyptian tomb . . . A portal in the park promises to turn you into a much cooler version 2.0—if you can just get the bugs out . . . Edited by New York Times bestselling comics creator Kazu Kibuishi, who is also a contributor, the third volume in

Overview


A bullied boy discovers a door guarded by a sly monster . . . A painting of a door opens in a forgotten Egyptian tomb . . . A portal in the park promises to turn you into a much cooler version 2.0—if you can just get the bugs out . . . Edited by New York Times bestselling comics creator Kazu Kibuishi, who is also a contributor, the third volume in this highly praised series gathers some of the foremost and fastest-rising talents in comics for kids: Jen Wang (Koko Be Good), Johane Matte (Explorer: The Mystery Boxes), Steve Hamaker (colorist of Jeff Smith’s Bone series), Faith Erin Hicks (Friends with Boys), DougHolgate (Zack Proton series), and Jason Caffoe (Explorer: The Lost Islands and Flight). Readers maynever walk into a room the same way again.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leona Illig
This collection of seven short stories, all told in graphic novel format, focus on what might lay behind an imaginary door to another world: adventure, fame, fortune—or danger. In “Luis 2.0,” the protagonists would like to be cooler and smarter than they are, but realize in the end that the road—or door—not taken is the better one. A similar fate awaits Shiro and Misa, the hero and heroine of “The Two-Person Door,” who find that the lives that they share in real life are more meaningful than illusory promises. Three of the stories contain typical science fiction/fantasy plots that have a considerable amount of humor in them. In “The Giant’s Kitchen,” the heroine loses her book of spells when she ventures into a giant’s mysterious lair; fortunately, the giant finds a good use for the volume. In “Fish N Chips in Spring Cleaning,” a cat and a robot (who sports a fish in a fishbowl for a head) have to stop a robot from wreaking havoc. In the third story, “When Is a Door Not a Door,” a heroine tries to outwit her enemies with a riddle in a dark and scary forest. The short story “Mastaba” has a setting that is a little more unusual than the others. A spirit from the world of ancient Egypt, who is in danger of losing his home and his life to some tomb robbers, is saved by the actions of a little mouse. The last story, “Asteria Crane,” is probably the most interesting. The reader is led on what appears to be a daring rescue mission in a hostile climate, only to discover in the end that nothing is what it seems. The idea of collecting short comic stories focused on one theme seems to be a growing trend in the graphic novel world, and this book does a better job than most of exploring a theme which is both entertaining and thought-provoking. Reviewer: Leona Illig; Ages 9 to 13.
School Library Journal
11/01/2014
Gr 4–8—Readers are once again presented with an array of stories created by a cast of comics authors and illustrators smartly assembled by Kibuishi. With a balance of styles, sensibilities, and palettes, the work showcases seven unique approaches to the central theme of finding a hidden door. Most of the entries hinge on a kid facing an emotional or physical peril. In "Asteria Crane," Kibuishi delivers a cinematic tale of experimental dream therapy that could easily be at home as a sci-fi film. In "Luis 2.0," Jen Wang shares a sweet vignette about wanting to become someone else, only to find it's better being one's authentic self after all. The range in this slim volume is expansive. From funny to deep and fantastical to refined, all of the stories have a compelling narrative arc. The colors are just as varied, and are universally dynamic and nuanced. Consider this (and previous series installments) as a necessary addition to any graphic novel collection.—Jenna Lanterman, formerly at The Calhoun School and Mary McDowell Friends School, New York City
Booklist - Snow Wildsmith

"The last three stories—Steve Hamaker’s rollicking 'Fish n Chips'; Johane Matte’s inventive Egyptian-graverobbing story, 'Mastaba'; and Jen Breach and Douglas Holgate’s pun-tastic fantasy action tale 'When Is a Door Not a Door?'—end the collection on a high note, with solid plots and gorgeous artwork. Expect followers of the popular series to snatch it up."
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-09-14
Enticing doorways give these seven new graphic shorts a common element. These doors range in nature from physical barriers, such as one concealing a lonely mummy's treasure in Johane Matte's "Mastaba," to a psychological threshold over which intrepid Asteria Crane in editor Kibuishi's story of the same name passes to enter a young patient's subconscious. In each tale, they lead sometimes to comical adventures, sometimes to life- (or, for the mummy, death-) changing experiences. An uncertain magician gains new confidence making soup in a "Giant's Kitchen," (Jason Caffoe), Faith Erin Hicks' "Two-Person Door" leads a would-be hero to adventure without his even opening it, and Jen Wang offers a wishing door that lets a self-conscious lad remodel himself into "Luis 2.0." Though done in different styles, the art features consistently clean lines, clear colors, easy-to-follow action and individually distinct characters. Another worthy entry in a series of themed collections that places production and storytelling on equally high pedestals. (Graphic short stories. 7-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419708848
Publisher:
Amulet Books
Publication date:
10/14/2014
Series:
Kazu Kibuishi's Explorer Series , #3
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
83,098
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Kazu Kibuishi is the author of Amulet, the award-winning New York Times bestselling graphic novel series; the illustrator of the new paperback covers for J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series; and the editor of eight volumes of Flight, the Eisner-nominated anthology series. He lives in Bellevue, Washington.

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