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The Hiram Key: Pharaohs, Freemasonry, and the Discovery of the Secret Scrolls of Jesus

Overview


The Hiram Key is a book that will shake the Christian world to its very roots. When Christopher Knight and Robert Lomas, both Masons, set out to find the origins of Freemasonry they had no idea that they would find themselves unraveling the true story of Jesus and the original Jerusalem Church. As a radically new picture of Jesus started to emerge, the authors came to the startling conclusion that the key rituals of modern Freemasonry were practiced by the early followers of Jesus as a means of initiation into ...
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Overview


The Hiram Key is a book that will shake the Christian world to its very roots. When Christopher Knight and Robert Lomas, both Masons, set out to find the origins of Freemasonry they had no idea that they would find themselves unraveling the true story of Jesus and the original Jerusalem Church. As a radically new picture of Jesus started to emerge, the authors came to the startling conclusion that the key rituals of modern Freemasonry were practiced by the early followers of Jesus as a means of initiation into their community.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781931412759
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2001
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 370,248
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Christopher Knight has a degree in advertising and graphic design and is the managing director of a marketing and advertising agency. In 1976 he became a Freemason.

Robert Lomas is the co-author of The Hiram Key, The Second Messiah, and Uriel's Machine. A Freemason, he lectures at Bradford University in England.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xii
1 The Lost Secrets of Freemasonry 1
2 The Search Begins 19
3 The Knights Templar 26
4 The Gnostic Connection 36
5 Jesus Christ: Man, God, Myth or Freemason? 44
6 In the Beginning Man Made God 81
7 The Legacy of the Egyptians 98
8 The First Freemason 120
9 The Birth of Judaism 152
10 A Thousand Years of Struggle 170
11 The Boaz and Jachin Pesher 189
12 The Man Who Turned Water into Wine 216
13 The Resurrection 257
14 The Truth Breaks Free 275
15 The Lost Scrolls Rediscovered 294
Postscript 323
Appendix 1: The Development of Modern Freemasonry and its Impact on the World 326
The English Reformation and the Conditions fo Emergence 326
The King Who Built the Lodge System 327
The Architects of the Second Degree 331
The New Heresy 333
The Old Charges 336
The Rise of the Republicans 342
The Royal Society Emerges 346
Freemasonry Finds Its Feet 348
The Spread of Freemasonry 351
The Development of Masonry in America 354
Appendix 2: Pre-1710 MasonicLodges in Scotland with Date of the First Recorded Mention 358
Appendix 3: Early Grand Masters of English Freemasonry 359
Appendix 4: Early Grand Masters of Scottish Freemasonry 361
Appendix 5: Chronology 363
Index 372
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Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2004

    Far from perfect, but it makes you think ...

    I really picked this book up to learn more about the history of Freemasonry. My father and grandfather were Masons, and I was in the junior order (De Molay), but I elected not to continue on. Thus, it wasn't so much a spiritual quest as a need to feed my 'history jones.' In reading this book, I learned a lot about Freemasonry, but I also learned more than I expected about religion, spirituality, and human nature! This is the first of an unfinished series of books describing the authors' attempt to piece together the full history of the Masonic rituals and stories. The goal seems to be to show a complete, rational connection from the religious beliefs and practices of ancient Egypt to modern times, all gided by the practices of Freemasonry. This would be an ambitious undertaking even if all the information was availible; given both the secrecy of the Masonic Order and the religious changes over the past 3,000 years, the task is daunting. I read their later book, 'The Second Messiah,' prior to this one, and so had the benefit of knowing which theories have continued to stand, and which have had to bend to fit new information. Overall, this is a fascinating ride through history, complete with glimpses into some areas of fact (and obviously, conjecture) that I might not have otherwise considered. Even if you don't buy into all of their conspiracy theories, the authors seem to recognize when a current explanation is inadequate. Put another way, while they may not have the right answer, they seem to be able to sense a wrong answer from a mile off. The book is not without its faults. The authors have a tendency to jump to lines of reasoning that don't seem obvious, ignoring -- or at least, not explaining why they ignored -- other equally plausible alternatives; and some of the 'facts' that they present (ex: Jesus couldn't have actually lived in place called Nazareth) are actually one of several debated options, not universally accepted truths. Part of the problem surely stems from to the authors' conflicting needs to both explain their thoughts, yet remain true to the tenents of the Masonic Order. I sometimes wondered if there was some additional background information that the authors felt compelled to leave out. If you're expecting this book to completely clear up all the unexplained issues of Christianity and Freemasonry, I suspect that you'll be very disappointed. The line of reasoning that Knight and Lomas provide is only one possible explanation, and by their own admission, they have yet to find a full proof that ties all of the loose ends together. However, the book is a great starting point to explore the recent discoveries about the life and times of Jesus, among other things -- assuming, of course, that your current beliefs don't crash too hard against the evidence the book provides. As for me, I will certainly be looking for the final book of the series!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2002

    If you have an open mind read it, otherwise reach for the funnies.

    As a Freemason, Scottish Rite Mason, York Rite Mason and a Shriner I read a lot of books concerning Masonry. I started the book as a guide to the origins of Masonry but came away with a great admiration for the extensive research that Knight and Lomas conducted. They state a very good case for all their deductions.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2003

    Excellent Read

    This book ties together the timeline and influences of the modern mason. Very interesting. A must have for any Br.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 5, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Interesting and Provocative

    I liked the book from the standpoint of providing some insight into Freemasonry hidden knowledge. Since the authors are both Masons, they are bound as to what they can reveal, and as they state, they can reveal some things that we the readers will not be aware of since we are not privy to the "key" to unlock the hidden meaning of words and terms. Other well known authors have also verified some of what is presented to the reader in this book, and as a researcher, can take the clues provided for my own research, which is something that everyone should do, and not just take the word of someone. One thing I didn't like was that not all their sources were provided for us to follow up, but this could be due to Masonic rules.

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  • Posted February 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Dissappointed

    First let me say I am not a Christian, I do not believe the bible to be accurate. I thrive on this subject matter and look forward to reading such material. That said this is a very poorly written book. There is little or no referencing. The authors state too many theories as established or fact with no support. Many of the conclusions they jump to are a pretty big leap. These arguments may or may not be plausible; but with no support they hold no more weight than a fictional story. I made it about half way through before I decided not to waste any more of my time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2002

    Curiousity and Facts

    I have to admit,usually when you hear the word freemasonary you think occult and something strange happening.Although my interest was not to know more about freemasonary what got me interested the facts from Ancient Egypt. I read a lot of books from Christian Jacq (Ramses II vol 1-5) and as I read about Moses and his action the more I started to wonder what kind of man was he and to think that he thought he had a god. I think that the current religion has 'stolen' the ideas of Ancient Egypt and this book also states on several occassions that jewish (as they are called now) have also incoperated alot of other cultures to form their own. One can not then say, hey my religion is true one. Is there god? a supreme being? perhaps there is. Was Jesus a god or a man....I say he was a man with some radical ideas at that time....I would recommend this book to people that can think outside of a square and most importantly that are open to suggestions and different views. Do not be scared, the truth is out there and it is not what we see at the moment...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2002

    WAKE UP

    WAKE UP PEOPLE THIS BOOK WILL SHOW YOU THE WAY AND FOR ALL THOSE LOST SOULS THAT HAVE BEEN BRAINWASHED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH DO SOME RESEARCH ON YOUR BELOVED EASTER OR CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS AND WILL FIND THEIR NOT WHAT THE ESTABLISHEMENT WANTS YOU TO BELIEVE OPEN UP AND READ THIS BOOK IT WILL SHOW A WAY TO THE TRUTH PATH I AM A FORMER CATHOLIC THAT GREW UP IN ITALY A NON DENOMINATION BELIEVER FOR OVER 18 YEARS

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2002

    So bad it smells!

    Brando and Scott are right-on in their reviews. This book is loaded with spellbinding nonsense, half-truths, utter fabrications, and wishful thinking. There are a few footnotes in the book on some of the verifiable facts, but the more outrageous "discoveries" such as quotes, documents, and so on are NOT REFERENCED! A quote by St. Augustine appears, but we are not told where it came from! We are told that Peter was the first witness of the resurrected Christ. (It was Mary Magdalene.) The Apostle Paul was a con-man? (One willing to die for his lies?) The list goes on and on! This book claims to blow the lid off of Christianity. Huh. It can do no real damage. Anyone who would believe this stuff is a few sandwiches short of a picnic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2002

    The Antichristian Book

    I found this book interesting yet disappointing. If you have faith in Christ Jesus keep strong if you don't have strong faith one can become very confused. This book seems to stand strongly against Christ and the christians who follow Jesus. In my oppinion they have done a lot of research but still have not proved anything such as a twin brother and that their was no virginal birth. This book is deceiving if anything.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2002

    Where are the facts?

    A very disappointing book. The authors make vague attempts to correlate facts that (most of the time) don't even exist. There are several references to the Bible that are flat out incorrect. The authors also fill in holes in their reference text with their own theories, and adopt them as fact by the end of the given section. Except for a few interesting facts here and there (that you have to wonder about after reading the book and seeing how incorrect the rest is), this book is not really worth the money.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2002

    No truth here

    Knight and Lomas are some of the poorest analysts I've read. They make correlations between documents based on similar words, linguistic mistakes based on similarities, come to illogical conclusions because of biases in interpretation and selective acceptance of historic records. Examples: their reason for including certain documents in their analysis and historical trail is based on similar phraseology. Just because documents may talk about 'secret rites' or 'secrets' doesn't mean that those secrets are the same from century to century, or from the Egyptian culture to the Israeli culture. Likewise, they relate the New Testament term 'wilderness' to the Qumran community's nickname 'Wilderness'. That's like saying all references to Springfield in the USA are based on a single community (when there are 30+ such named communities). They relate Nazarene to Nasorean rather than Nazirite, and other such linguistic correlations. That's like saying 'light' (not heavy) is related to 'lightning' because they have the same root. The words are similar but the context is different. They relate the Freemason creed to earlier creeds. However, they believe Freemasonry is derivative because of similar values. Hardly. Many creeds can develop independently yet espouse similar values. It is illogical to induce that all creeds came from one. Likewise, they author several speculative fictions, call them fictions but then treat them as legitimate historical fact in later arguments. Additionally, they accept certain biblical records as accurate, denounce other records with no more or less corraboration and rely more heavily on other historical records that have a greater problem of chronological distance from the event and even less corroboration. One little example: they state the age of the biblical character Joseph as higher than the biblical record, accept Jacob's age, but decrease Isaac and Abraham's stated age...as far as the reader can tell, for the purposes of having certain calculations work out exact with their preconceived conclusion. Likewise, they interpret the evidence to fit other conclusions. Example: an illustration of ca. 1120 shows the Heavenly Jerusalem. They have identified twelve towers as having some names of disciples. However, they interpret two uppermost towers as labeled with the name of James, the brother of Jesus. They have overlooked that there were two disciples named James: son of Zebedee and son of Alphaeus. In the photo of the illustration, one tower is clearly labeled James Alphaeus (or Jacob Alphaeus). The other is labeled differently. They interpret the position of the towers as significant not knowing that illustrations from that era had no three-dimensional perspective. It would be the size of the towers that are significant. The uppermost and largest tower is labeled Zion as they point out, but it also looks like there is a second label of John or IHS (the abbreviation for Jesus of Nazareth's title). Judas Iscariot may have been omitted since there is one tower labeled Judas, that could be the one who was the son of a James. (See the Gospel of John.) If you want to expose yourself to some legitimate questions, there are a few in this book. But you need lots of patience to find them in the fiction the authors have written in this tome.

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    Posted April 21, 2009

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