The Historic Shops and Restaurants of New York: A Guide to Century-Old Establishments in the City

The Historic Shops and Restaurants of New York: A Guide to Century-Old Establishments in the City

by Ellen Williams, Steve Radlaur, Steve Radlauer
     
 

Discover the bygone city of Mark Twain and Stanford White, Harry Houdini and Edith Wharton in the venerable shops and restaurants that have served discriminating New Yorkers for generations. In Old World dining rooms, gaslit saloons, at jewelers, tobacconists, apothecaries, and more, these are the establishments that have endured by offering highly desirable goods

Overview

Discover the bygone city of Mark Twain and Stanford White, Harry Houdini and Edith Wharton in the venerable shops and restaurants that have served discriminating New Yorkers for generations. In Old World dining rooms, gaslit saloons, at jewelers, tobacconists, apothecaries, and more, these are the establishments that have endured by offering highly desirable goods and dining experiences. Visit the tavern where George Washington bade farewell to his troops, the haberdashery where Abe Lincoln traded in his backwoods cap for a more distinguished stovepipe hat, the Lower East Side delis, the coffee merchants of Greenwich Village, the purveyors of riding boots, andirons, brass beds, and nautical charts. From world-famous department stores to humble pasta-makers, this volume is a charming and useful guide to the living landmarks of New York.

Editorial Reviews

The New Yorker
What news from New York?" F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote in an imaginary conversation in "My Lost City," a 1936 essay. " 'Stocks go up. A baby murdered a gangster.' 'Nothing more?' " The city, in all its confounding glory, is the subject of Kenneth T. Jackson and David S. Dunbar's anthology, Empire City, which begins with an account of Henry Hudson's 1609 voyage, includes Frederick Law Olmsted's original plan for Central Park, and recounts such forgotten chapters as the 1909 strike of twenty thousand female garment workers.

The influx of immigrants to the city changed everything. The Historic Shops and Restaurants of New York, a guide by Ellen Williams and Steve Radlauer, looks at business brainstorms from a century ago. At the end of the nineteenth century, two hairdressers agreed to spruce up the tresses of porcelain beauties with push-broom lashes and rose paint smiles, and soon so much of their business consisted of these miniature makeovers that, in 1900, they renamed their establishment the Doll Hospital.

The city has always had a knack for improvisation. It Happened on Washington Square, Emily Kies Folpe's social history of the Greenwich Village park -- once a potter's field -- explains that the square's Washington Arch was a temporary innovation that persisted: the original, conceived by the architect Stanford White as a parade decoration in 1889, was made of white-painted pine and papier-mâché and was popular enough to soon be replaced by a stone version.

(Lauren Porcaro)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781892145154
Publisher:
New York Review Books
Publication date:
10/28/2002
Pages:
351
Product dimensions:
4.34(w) x 6.11(h) x 1.20(d)

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