The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery

The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery

by Junius P. Rodriguez
     
 

The first work of its kind to document slavery on a global scale, The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery is a two volume set that provides an in depth portrayal of human bondage and the slave trade from ancient times to the present.

• Presents 700 topics of world slavery in 500 to 1,500 word entries that are extensively cross referenced with

Overview

The first work of its kind to document slavery on a global scale, The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery is a two volume set that provides an in depth portrayal of human bondage and the slave trade from ancient times to the present.

• Presents 700 topics of world slavery in 500 to 1,500 word entries that are extensively cross referenced with bibliographical citations for further research

• Biographies portray the lives of notable figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mansa Musa, Laroslav the Wise

• 100 illustrations, with maps accompanying core essays involving specific geographic locations

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The international contributors to this encyclopedia have created a work that should serve as the definitive reference source in this field for all college, university, and public library collections. All readers." - Choice

"The high quality of the essays and the comprehensive nature of this work make it an outstanding choice for any academic or public library." - American Libraries

"This encyclopedia . . . is the first landmark work on the perplexing issue of world slavery. The 203 contributors present a formidable, objective, and complete encyclopedic account of slavery, placed in historical, worldwide perspective. . . . Enthusiastically recommended for both academic and public libraries." - Library Journal

"[T]his is a unique reference source suitable for any library serving the student population." - VOYA

VOYA - Kevin S. Beach
Finally, here is a comprehensive work that documents the global institution of slavery, and not just America's oppression of Africans and Native Americans. This title traces the institution back to the earliest civilizations in Mesopotamia, through the classical and medieval eras and the well-known American slave trade, and into the twentieth century, discussing Nazi genocidal labor camps and Japanese soldiers' use of "comfort women" in World War II. Coverage includes the United Nations committee that still investigates reports of slave labor around the globe. The reference follows the standard A to Z format and includes many cross-references. Standard entries range from famous names and country surveys to histories of tribes and slave rebellions, along with discussing cultural phenomena such as Juneteenth and Conjure culture. Many illustrations gleaned from archival drawings and advertisements accompany the text. There is an impressively extensive bibliography of sources, representative of the many highly respected scholars and contributors who participated in its development-over 200 academic experts wrote the 650+ entries. An in-depth index adds to its ease of use. The views of Plato, Jefferson, and the world's leading religious holy books on the institution of slavery are fascinating. Entries covering the works of noted historians such as Stanley Elkins, Kenneth Stampp, and U. B. Phillips demonstrate the evolution of the general perceptions and accepted imagery of the slave experience over time. The text is surprisingly accessible to even to the middle school student. This is a great source for snippets of primary source material and brief overviews of historical events. Despite the price tag, with its global and historical perspective this is a unique reference source suitable for any library serving the student population. Two volumes. Index. Illus. Maps. Biblio.
Library Journal
This encyclopedia, edited by Rodriguez (history, Eureka Coll.) and an editorial board of eminent scholars, is the first landmark work on the perplexing issue of world slavery. The 203 contributors (including 37 of diverse nationalities) present a formidable, objective, and complete encyclopedic account of slavery, placed in historical, worldwide perspective, as too few people know it. It covers, in alphabetical order, topics such as "Amerindian Slavery," "Asian/Buddhist Monastic Slavery," "Black Slaveowners," "Sambo Thesis," "Sexual Enslavement by Japanese Military," "Irish Slaves in the Caribbean," "Judaism and the Ante-bellum South," and "Muslim Slaves in the Americas." It offers an impressive array of detailed information in a concise format and provides illustrations, excellent cross-references, and maps to accompany the signed entries, most with excellent suggestions for further reading. An extensive and universal bibliography and an index that provides easy access to the materials conclude the book. Enthusiastically recommended for both academic and public libraries. [Also watch for A Historical Guide to World Slavery from Oxford University and Paul Finkelman's Encyclopedia of Slavery, Prentice-Hall, both forthcoming.Ed.]Edward G. McCormack, Univ. of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast Lib., Long Beach
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-The ambitious undertaking of capturing within the covers of even two large volumes, the story of human slavery through the ages, is creditably achieved in this publication. At first glance, the alphabetical arrangement seems haphazard. Spartacus, the Roman gladiator, is followed by Kenneth Stampp, American historian. Cicero shares a page with Cinque, of Amistad fame. However, the surface fragmentation masks a complete network of cross-references and suggested readings, leading readers to new names and headings and an ever-widening area of study. Each essay carries the byline of one of the more than 100 academic contributors. An extensive bibliography and index are appended to the second volume, along with the sources of numerous black-and-white prints and reproductions that accompany the text. Rodriguez's introduction ties together the wide-ranging topics with a useful overview of slavery from the earliest times, pointing, for example, to the existence of the first true slave societies in the classical world and the emergence of racial slavery after the establishment of the African trade in the 1450s. All eras have seen the enslavement of human beings in some form or another, a fact that explains the interest and purpose that lie behind this undertaking. With entries for well-known persons, places, and historical events, this resource is certainly useful as a reference work, but it also invites browsing. The coverage is both cross-cultural and interdisciplinary. A useful addition to any reference collection.-Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ
Booknews
This two-volume reference contains 650-plus alphabetically arranged, signed entries which focus on various aspects of human bondage in all its forms throughout the ages. An introduction offers a historical overview and identifies the common threads that run through the slave systems of fundamentally different cultures. Entries, most about a page (two-column format), discuss general themes (e.g. women and slavery in Islam) as well as important incidents (e.g. Amistad) and individuals. Each entry includes suggestions for further reading and cross references; some contain b&w illustrations. The same five maps are included in both volumes, and a subject index is included in volume II; but a theme encyclopedia such as this should include more materials that give access to the contents in useful ways, e.g. a timeline, a chronology of individuals, and a classification of events. The bibliography is extensive, but not classified. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780874368857
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/28/1997
Pages:
860
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.94(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

Meet the Author

Junius P. Rodriguez, PhD, is associate professor of history at Eureka College, Eureka, IL. His published works include ABC-CLIO's award-winning The Louisiana Purchase and Chronology of World Slavery.

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