The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

by Isaac Newton Arnold
     
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OVERTHROW OF SLAVERY. CHAPTER I. SLAVERY FROM 1788, TO THE COMPROMISE MEASURES OF 1800. Opinion or The Fathers Upon Slavery -- Ordinance Of 1787 -- Early

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OVERTHROW OF SLAVERY. CHAPTER I. SLAVERY FROM 1788, TO THE COMPROMISE MEASURES OF 1800. Opinion or The Fathers Upon Slavery -- Ordinance Of 1787 -- Early Abolition Societies -- Slavery Abolished In The New England States, New York, Pennsylvania, And New Jersey -- Cotton And Slavery -- Location Of Capital At Washington -- Fugitive Slave Law Op 1793 -- Admission Of Tennessee, Alabama And Mississippi, As Slave States -- Purchase Of Louisiana And Florida -- Missouri Compromise -- Sem1nole War -- Annexation Of Texas -- Mexican War -- Wilmot Proviso -- California -- Anti-slavery Convention -- Suppression Of Riolit Of Petition -- John Quincy Adams -- Judge Hoar's Mission -- Abolition, Liberty And Freesoil Parties -- Compromise Measures Of 1850. TT is historically demonstrable that the framers of the '' Constitution in shaping that instrument, tolerated the existence of slavery as a temporary evil, which they regarded as incompatible with the principles of liberty embodied in the Declaration of Independence, upon which they intended to base our institutions. They believed that it was in the course of gradual extinction. It is clear that they never intended it should be a permanent institution, much less thatit should extend beyond the limits of the States in which it then existed. The hostility to slavery was so general, that it is believed the Fathers would have embodied abolition as a part of the Constitution, had they not supposed it would soon disappear before the peaceful moral agencies then operating against it. They confidently hoped that public opinion, expressing itself through the press, the religious organizations, public discnssion, and rendering its final verdict through the ballot, and securing favorable legislation throug...

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ISBN-13:
2940026429530
Publisher:
Clarke & Co.
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OVERTHROW OF SLAVERY. CHAPTER I. SLAVERY FROM 1788, TO THE COMPROMISE MEASURES OF 1800. Opinion or The Fathers Upon Slavery -- Ordinance Of 1787 -- Early Abolition Societies -- Slavery Abolished In The New England States, New York, Pennsylvania, And New Jersey -- Cotton And Slavery -- Location Of Capital At Washington -- Fugitive Slave Law Op 1793 -- Admission Of Tennessee, Alabama And Mississippi, As Slave States -- Purchase Of Louisiana And Florida -- Missouri Compromise -- Sem1nole War -- Annexation Of Texas -- Mexican War -- Wilmot Proviso -- California -- Anti-slavery Convention -- Suppression Of Riolit Of Petition -- John Quincy Adams -- Judge Hoar's Mission -- Abolition, Liberty And Freesoil Parties -- Compromise Measures Of 1850. TT is historically demonstrable that the framers of the '' Constitution in shaping that instrument, tolerated the existence of slavery as a temporary evil, which they regarded as incompatible with the principles of liberty embodied in the Declaration of Independence, upon which they intended to base our institutions. They believed that it was in the course of gradual extinction. It is clear that they never intended it should be a permanent institution, much less thatit should extend beyond the limits of the States in which it then existed. The hostility to slavery was so general, that it is believed the Fathers would have embodied abolition as a part of the Constitution, had they not supposed it would soon disappear before the peaceful moral agencies then operating against it. They confidently hoped that public opinion, expressing itself through the press, the religious organizations, public discnssion, and rendering its finalverdict through the ballot, and securing favorable legislation throug...

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