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The History of Sir George Ellison

Overview

Sarah Robinson Scott (1720-1795), the author of novels, biographies, and histories, was born to many advantages of education and upbringing that made her a writer. But without a strong desire for financial independence, she might never have become a professional author. She saw a great advantage in being unmarried because only unmarried women were free to work toward their own ends. This theme was to be incorporated into her first novel and best known work, A Description of Millenium Hall (1762). The History of ...
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Overview

Sarah Robinson Scott (1720-1795), the author of novels, biographies, and histories, was born to many advantages of education and upbringing that made her a writer. But without a strong desire for financial independence, she might never have become a professional author. She saw a great advantage in being unmarried because only unmarried women were free to work toward their own ends. This theme was to be incorporated into her first novel and best known work, A Description of Millenium Hall (1762). The History of Sir George Ellison (1766) is a sequel to Millenium Hall. In it, Sir George, a visitor to the Hall, follows the pattern of the female utopia set forth in the earlier novel. Scott addresses issues of slavery, marriage, education, law and social justice, class pretensions, and the position of women in society. Throughout the book Scott consistently emphasizes the importance, for both genders and all classes and ages, of devoting one's life and most of one's time to meaningful work.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Scott (1720-1795), an affluent and educated Englishwoman eminent in her day for her benevolence, good works and nine books of fiction, biography and history, published Ellison in 1766. Although Scott is largely unknown today, her writing was well received in its time and understandably so. Her voice is amiable and articulate, and, though sticking to popular 18th-century devices and a ladylike tone, she takes on provocative topics. George Ellison is a visitor to Millennium Hall, the utopian society run by five single women that was the focus of Scott's A Description of Millennium Hall (1762). Unfolding his life's travels allows Scott to raise key concerns: the importance of education; the problems of marriage; the pretensions of class privilege; the condition of women; the crime of slavery; and others. Although Scott eschewed marriage to live in an unorthodox, commune-like setting much like Millennium Hall, both her politics and her writing style are tempered and reformist, not revolutionary. As editor Rizzo notes in her detailed introduction, beneath the apparent ``accommodation'' criticized by some scholars is a ``sense of outrage controlled by an intellectual perception of what she could and could not propose.'' Whatever Scott's more radical instincts were, they had to be restrained. Still, today's readers will be struck by her conviction and relevance, and by the astonishing good sense of this largely forgotten female writer. (Jan.)
Booknews
Radiologists experienced with the technique explain the principles behind using magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with a substance the patient takes internally to enhance the contrast. They also review its clinical application in the head, spine, and body; and consider safety aspects and future developments, especially new agents besides the three currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Very high quality black-and-white illustrations are accompanied by text detailing procedures and interpretation. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Booknews
Presents the sequel to an 18th-century female author's first novel, written in 1766, addressing issues such as slavery, marriage, education, social justice, class, and the position of women in society. An introduction details the life and works of Scott, and extensive notes explain concepts and references in the novel. Paper edition (unseen), $15.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"A striking example of both the reformist aspirations of sensibility and the political ambitions of women writers during the mid-century." — British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies

"Fill(s) a genuine need among scholars and students interested in early British women novelists." — Kritikon Litterarum

"Although Scott is largely unknown today, her writing was well received in its time and understandably so. Her voice is amiable and articulate, and, though sticking to popular 18th-century devices and a ladylike tone, she takes on provocative topics.... Today's readers will be struck by her conviction and relevance." — Publishers Weekly

"Offers the best biographical information hitherto published on Scott." — Utopian Studies

"The issues of slavery, female education, and marriage make it of interest to cultural critics." — Wordsworth Circle

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781498164733
  • Publisher: Literary Licensing, LLC
  • Publication date: 8/7/2014
  • Pages: 294
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Contributors
Ch. 1 Principles of MR Contrast 1
Ch. 2 Brain: Neoplastic Disease 15
Ch. 3 Brain: Non-Neoplastic Disease 61
Ch. 4 Spine: Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Disease 91
Ch. 5 Body Applications 119
Ch. 6 Safety, New Applications, and New MR Agents 139
Index 176
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