History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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by Edward Gibbon
     
 

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In the second century of the Christian Aera, the empire of Rome comprehended the fairest part of the earth, and the most civilized portion of mankind. The frontiers of that extensive monarchy were guarded by ancient renown and disciplined valor. The gentle but powerful influence of laws and manners had gradually cemented the union of the provinces. Their peaceful

Overview

In the second century of the Christian Aera, the empire of Rome comprehended the fairest part of the earth, and the most civilized portion of mankind. The frontiers of that extensive monarchy were guarded by ancient renown and disciplined valor. The gentle but powerful influence of laws and manners had gradually cemented the union of the provinces. Their peaceful inhabitants enjoyed and abused the advantages of wealth and luxury. The image of a free constitution was preserved with decent reverence: the Roman senate appeared to possess the sovereign authority, and devolved on the emperors all the executive powers of government. During a happy period of more than fourscore years, the public administration was conducted by the virtue and abilities of Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the two Antonines. It is the design of this, and of the two succeeding chapters, to describe the prosperous condition of their empire; and after wards, from the death of Marcus Antoninus, to deduce the most important circumstances of its decline and fall; a revolution which will ever be remembered, and is still felt by the nations of the earth.

The principal conquests of the Romans were achieved under the republic; and the emperors, for the most part, were satisfied with preserving those dominions which had been acquired by the policy of the senate, the active emulations of the consuls, and the martial enthusiasm of the people. The seven first centuries were filled with a rapid succession of triumphs; but it was reserved for Augustus to relinquish the ambitious design of subduing the whole earth, and to introduce a spirit of moderation into the public councils. Inclined to peace by his temper and situation, it was easy for him to discover that Rome, in her present exalted situation, had much less to hope than to fear from the chance of arms; and that, in the prosecution of remote wars, the undertaking became every day more difficult, the event more doubtful, and the possession more precarious, and less beneficial. The experience of Augustus added weight to these salutary reflections, and effectually convinced him that, by the prudent vigor of his counsels, it would be easy to secure every concession which the safety or the dignity of Rome might require from the most formidable barbarians. Instead of exposing his person and his legions to the arrows of the Parthians, he obtained, by an honorable treaty, the restitution of the standards and prisoners which had been taken in the defeat of Crassus.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940148302490
Publisher:
Bronson Tweed Publishing
Publication date:
01/30/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
744 KB

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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A remarkable historical resource, 'History' covers all the details and answered many of my historical questions with regards to the Roman Empire. It was a tough reader, yet I was able to retain alot of the information contained in this HUGE text!
Katie Sullivan More than 1 year ago
The pagination is disastrious. Poorly assembled e-book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All presented in just enough does to keep one interested. A truly important and fascinating piece of sholarship. .
Kimiad More than 1 year ago
I purchased this ebook directly from the page for the Penguin edition of the unabridged Decline and Fall, where it is offered as a substitute edition. Unfortunately it is not clearly marked as such - the print saying so is so minuscule that an ant couldn't read it. So be forewarned it is not the Penguin edition. No ebook is yet available for the Penguin edition prepared by David P. Womersley. Penguin has responded to my inquiry about the ebook and says that their edition of Gibbons will be available in the future. They are in the process of converting their vast number of publications to ebook form and are uncertain when they'll get to this one.
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Cherie Young More than 1 year ago
I saw way too many spelling errors an missing letters replaced by *.
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