The History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire (V. 6)

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A.D. 636.] CADESIA. 11 the prince, he was only fifteen years of age, declined a perilous encounter; the royal standard was delivered into the hands of his general Eustam; and a remnant of thirty thousand regular troops was swelled...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
A.D. 636.] CADESIA. 11 the prince, he was only fifteen years of age, declined a perilous encounter; the royal standard was delivered into the hands of his general Eustam; and a remnant of thirty thousand regular troops was swelled in truth, or in opinion, to one hundred and twenty thousand subjects, or allies, of the great king. The Moslems, whose numbers were reinforced from twelve to thirty thousand, had pitched their camp in the plains of Cadesia : and their line, though it consisted of fewer men, could produce more soldiers than the unwieldy host of the infidels. I shall here observe, what 1 must often repeat, that the charge of the Arabs was not like that of the Greeks and Eomans, the effort of a firm and compact infantry: thei military force was chiefly formed of cavalry and archers; and the engagement, which was often interrupted and often renewed by single combats and flying skirmishes, might be protracted without any decisive event to the continuance of several days. The periods of the battle of Cadesia were distinguished by their peculiar appellations. The first, from the well-timed appearance of six thousand of the Syrian brethren, was denominated the day of succour. The day of concussion might express the disorder of one, or perhaps of both, of the contending armies, The third, a nocturnal tumult, received the whimsical name of the night of barking, from the dis- [Clinton has shown (P. R. ii. 262) how imperfectly Abulpharagius was acquainted with Persian history, and (p. 172) that the era of Yezde- gerd determines the accession of that monarch to the year 632. Major Price is wrong in fixing it at 635. Sir John Malcolm, in his History of Persia, uses the correct date. Scaliger, Petaviiis, and others, erroneously make the era of Yezdegerd commence from his death in...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217389723
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/13/2009
  • Pages: 198
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.42 (d)

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" " disease was ascribed to the miraculous succour of the holy martyrs Cosmas and Damian. The capital and the provinces of the east were decorated with the monuments of his religion ;m and, though the far greater part of these'costly structures maybe attributed to his taste or ostentation, the zeal of the royal architect was probably quickened by a genuine sense of love and gratitude towards his invisible benefactors. Among the titles of imperial greatness, the name of Pious was most pleasing to his ear; to promote the temporal and spiritual interests of the church, was the serious business of his life; and the duty of father of his country was often sacrificed to that of defender of the faith. The controversies of the times were congenial to his temper and understanding; and the theological professors must inwardly deride the diligence of a stranger, who cultivated their art and neglected his own. What can ye fear (said a bold conspirator to his associates) from your bigoted tyrant; Sleepless and unarmed he sits whole nights in his closet, debating with reverend gray-beards, and turning over the pages of ecclesiastical volumes." The fruits of these lucubrations were displayed in many a conference, where Justinian might shine as the loudest and most subtle of the disputants; in many a sermon, which, under the name of edicts and epistles, proclaimed to the empire the theology of their master. While the barbarians invaded the provinces, while the victorius legions marched under the banners of Belisarius and Narses, the successor of Trajan, unknown to the camp, was content to vanquish at the head of a synod. Had he invited to these synods a disinterested and rational spectator,Justinian might have learned that religious controversy is the offspring of arrogance and folly; that tr...
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2002

    BORING!!!!!!!!!!!

    i am sorry to all the historians out there that seem to think that this is an excellent book but I found it unreadable and finally just gave up. My father is a professor of archealogy and he had recommended that I read it but I just couldn't make any sense of it. I was looking for a good entertaining book about the Roman empire and this was not it. Maybe I am just not intellectual enough-sorry Dad!

    4 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2003

    Great source of research

    A remarkable historical resource, 'History' covers all the details and answered many of my historical questions with regards to the Roman Empire. It was a tough reader, yet I was able to retain alot of the information contained in this HUGE text!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2011

    Terrible version

    Bad

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Poorly written

    I saw way too many spelling errors an missing letters replaced by *.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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