The History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire (V. 5)

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Tarentum, interrupted the trade and agriculture of an.happy country, and sailed back to the Hellespont, proud of their piratical victory over a people whom they still presumed to consider as Uieir /toman brethren (46). Their ...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Tarentum, interrupted the trade and agriculture of an.happy country, and sailed back to the Hellespont, proud of their piratical victory over a people whom they still presumed to consider as Uieir /toman brethren (46). Their retreat was possibly hastened by the activity of Theodoric; Italy was covered by a fleet of a thousand light vessels (47), which he constructed with incredible despatch; and his firm moderation was soon rewarded by a solid and honourable peace. He maintained with a powerful hand the balance of the West, till it was at length overthrown by the ambition of Clovis; and although unable to assist his rash and unfortunate kinsman the king of the Visigoths, he saved the remains of his family and people-, and checked the Franks in the midst of their victorious career. I am not desirous to prolong or repeat (48) this narrative of military events, the least interesting of the reign of Theodoric; and shall be content to add, that the Alemaani were protected (49), that an inroad of the Burgundians was severely chastised, and that the conquest of Aries and Marseilles opened a free communication with the Visigoths, who revered him both as their national protector, and as the guardian of his grandehild, the infant son of Marie. Under this respectable character, the king of Italy restored the praetorian prefecture of the Gauls, reformed some abuses in the civil government of Spain, and accepted the annual tribute and apparent submission of its military governor, who wisely refused to trust his person in the palace of Ravenna (50). The Gothic sovereignty was established from Sicily to the Danube, from Sirmium or Belgrade to the Atlantic Ocean; and the Greeks themselves have acknowledged that Theodoric reigned over the fairest portion of the Western empire (51). The union of...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781458922243
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/3/2009
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.42 (d)

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monawli. Ho w.- ignorant, the profane historian, of the testimony which he is compelled to deliver in the ecclesiastical page of Evagr us, that the Palladium was exposed on the rampart, and that, the water which had been sprinkled on the holy face, instead of quenching, added new fuel to the flames of the besieged. After this important service, the image of fidessa was preserved with respect and gratitude; and if the Armenians rejected the legend, the more credulous Greeks adored the similitude, which was not the work of any mortal pencil, but the immediate creation of the divine original. The style and sentiments of a Byzantine hymn will declare how far their worship was removed from the grossest idolatry. " How can we with mortal eyes contemplate this image, whose celestial splendor the host of heaven presumes not to behold ? He who dwells in heaven, condescends this day to visit us by his venerable image; He who is seated on the cherubim, visits us this day by a picture, which the Father has delineated with his immaculate hand, which he has formed in an ineffable manner, and which we sanctify by adoring it with fear and love." Before the end of the sixth century, these images, made without hands, (in Greek it is a single word,11) were propagated in the camps and cities of the Eastern empire :la they were the objects of worship, and the instruments of miracles ; and in the hour of danger or tumult, ther venerable presence could revive the hope, rekindle the courage, or repress the fury, of the Roman legions. Of these pictures, the far greater part, the transcripts of a human pencil, could only pretend to a secondary likeness and improper title: but there were some ofhigher descent, who derived their resemblance from an immediate contact 11 './/aigoTtoi'ijTos. See Ducange, in...
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2002

    BORING!!!!!!!!!!!

    i am sorry to all the historians out there that seem to think that this is an excellent book but I found it unreadable and finally just gave up. My father is a professor of archealogy and he had recommended that I read it but I just couldn't make any sense of it. I was looking for a good entertaining book about the Roman empire and this was not it. Maybe I am just not intellectual enough-sorry Dad!

    4 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2003

    Great source of research

    A remarkable historical resource, 'History' covers all the details and answered many of my historical questions with regards to the Roman Empire. It was a tough reader, yet I was able to retain alot of the information contained in this HUGE text!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2011

    Terrible version

    Bad

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Poorly written

    I saw way too many spelling errors an missing letters replaced by *.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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