The History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire (Volume 1)

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or constitutional freedom. In Etruria, in Greece29, and in Gaul29, it was the first care of the senate to dissolve those dangerous confederacies, which taught mankind that, as the Roman anna prevailed by division, they might be ...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
or constitutional freedom. In Etruria, in Greece29, and in Gaul29, it was the first care of the senate to dissolve those dangerous confederacies, which taught mankind that, as the Roman anna prevailed by division, they might be resisted by union. Those princes, whom the ostentation of gratitude or generosity permitted for a while to hold a precarious sceptre, were dismissed from then- thrones, as soon as they had performed their appointed task of fashioning to the yoke the vanquished nations. The free states and cities which had embraced the cause of Rome were rewarded with a nominal alliance, and insensibly sunk into real servitude. The public authority was every where exercised by the ministers of the senate and of the emperors, and that authority was absolute, and without contro1., But the same salutary maxims of government, which had secured the peace and obedience of Italy, were extended to the most distant conquests. A nation of Romans was gradually formed in the provinces, by the double expedient of introducing colonies, and of admitting the most faithful and deserving of the provincials to the freedom of Rome. coionics " Wheresoever the Roman conquers, he inhabits," is a pal iownt" very just observation of Seneca :30, confirmed by history and experience. The natives of Italy, allured by pleasure or by interest, hastened to enjoy the advantages of victory; and we may remark, that, about forty years after the reduction of Asia, eighty thousand Romans were massacred in one day, by the cruel orders of Mithridates." These voluntary exiles were engaged, for the most part, in the occupations of commerce, agriculture, and the farm of the revenue. But after the legions were rendered permanent by the emperors, the provinces were peopled by a race of soldiers ; and the veterans, whet...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781458922335
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 10/14/2010
  • Pages: 238
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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or constitutional freedom. In Etruria, in Greece29, and in Gaul29, it was the first care of the senate to dissolve those dangerous confederacies, which taught mankind that, as the Roman anna prevailed by division, they might be resisted by union. Those princes, whom the ostentation of gratitude or generosity permitted for a while to hold a precarious sceptre, were dismissed from then- thrones, as soon as they had performed their appointed task of fashioning to the yoke the vanquished nations. The free states and cities which had embraced the cause of Rome were rewarded with a nominal alliance, and insensibly sunk into real servitude. The public authority was every where exercised by the ministers of the senate and of the emperors, and that authority was absolute, and without contro1., But the same salutary maxims of government, which had secured the peace and obedience of Italy, were extended to the most distant conquests. A nation of Romans was gradually formed in the provinces, by the double expedient of introducing colonies, and of admitting the most faithful and deserving of the provincials to the freedom of Rome. coionics " Wheresoever the Roman conquers, he inhabits," is a pal iownt" very just observation of Seneca :30, confirmed by history and experience. The natives of Italy, allured by pleasure or by interest, hastened to enjoy the advantages of victory; and we may remark, that, about forty years after the reduction of Asia, eighty thousand Romans were massacred in one day, by the cruel orders of Mithridates." These voluntary exiles were engaged, for the most part, in the occupations of commerce, agriculture, and the farm of the revenue. But after the legions wererendered permanent by the emperors, the provinces were peopled by a race of soldiers ; and the veterans, whet...
Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2002

    BORING!!!!!!!!!!!

    i am sorry to all the historians out there that seem to think that this is an excellent book but I found it unreadable and finally just gave up. My father is a professor of archealogy and he had recommended that I read it but I just couldn't make any sense of it. I was looking for a good entertaining book about the Roman empire and this was not it. Maybe I am just not intellectual enough-sorry Dad!

    4 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2003

    Great source of research

    A remarkable historical resource, 'History' covers all the details and answered many of my historical questions with regards to the Roman Empire. It was a tough reader, yet I was able to retain alot of the information contained in this HUGE text!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2011

    Terrible version

    Bad

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Poorly written

    I saw way too many spelling errors an missing letters replaced by *.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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