The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership

The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership

by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
     
 

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From the award-winning nonfiction team that brought you The Buffalo and the Indians comes a new companion work that tells of the transformative period in the early 16th century when the Spaniards introduced horses to the Great Plains, and how horses became, and remain, a key part of the Plains Indians' culture.See more details below

Overview

From the award-winning nonfiction team that brought you The Buffalo and the Indians comes a new companion work that tells of the transformative period in the early 16th century when the Spaniards introduced horses to the Great Plains, and how horses became, and remain, a key part of the Plains Indians' culture.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Certain to draw readers who are interested in Native American history or horses, making it a good choice for middle level collections."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Simple language and clear organization help readers fully engage with the material."—Horn Book

"Very well done; and important resource."—Kirkus

 "Thoroughly entertaining . . . readers will easily sit back and enjoy the fun."—Booklist

Children's Literature - Robert Perret
An engaging history of the plains Indians beginning with the arrival of Spanish explorer Hernando Cortez in 1519. He was the first person to bring horses to the Americas. Enslaved Indians were tasked with caring for the Spanish horses, and thus learned horsemanship themselves. By 1770 all of the Plains tribes, and many of the Plateau tribes, had become horse nations. By the end of the nineteenth century the U.S. government deprived Indians of their horses as part of the move onto reservations by selling, commandeering, or simply shooting tens of thousands of animals. In 1934 the Indian Reorganization Act restored enough political power to Indians that they could begin living with horses again. As the narrative of history progresses the text describes the traditional method for training horses. It describes the surprisingly honored art of horse stealing within Indian culture. Later horses became common gifts that raise the status of the receiver and the giver. There are fascinating sections addressing horse culture, specifically horse medicine, a sympathetic magic that enhanced one's ability to find and steal horses, conducted by special horse songs and ceremonies. The meaning of horse war paint is explored and decorative horse gear is described. Finally, the use of horses in war, including their leather armor and Spanish style tack is detailed. The beautiful photography and design help carry the reader through the four centuries encompassed by this history. This excellent book is highly recommended for any readers with an interest in horses, Native Americans, or U.S. History. Contains a bibliography and index. Reviewer: Robert Perret
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8—In this companion to The Buffalo and the Indians (Clarion, 2006), Patent and Muñoz show how the introduction of horses to North America transformed the lives of the Native American tribes living on or near the Great Plains. The book opens with a chapter on the "dog days" before horses, when Plains Indians used dogs for hunting buffalo and as pack animals. Subsequent chapters discuss how they "acquired" Spanish horses and rapidly developed an equine culture that revolutionized their buffalo-based existence and changed economic, social, and inter-tribal relationships throughout the region. Patent also examines how tribes incorporated the horse into their cultural and spiritual beliefs and rituals and warfare. She concludes with a discussion of how white expansion and confinement to reservations threatened the relationship between horses and Native people and describes the modern resurgence of Plains Indians horse culture, including tribal fairs and riding events that highlight their traditions and rituals. This book shares the same format as the previous title, and it features a well-written and readable narrative, appealing and informative full-color photographs, and reproductions of period illustrations. Although the two titles complement each other and give readers a comprehensive look at Plains Indian culture, this book can also stand alone and is certain to draw readers who are interested in Native American history or horses, making it a good choice for middle level collections.—Mary Mueller, formerly at Rolla Junior High School, MO
Kirkus Reviews
In a follow-up to their acclaimed The Buffalo and the Indians (2006), Patent and Munoz discuss how the Plains Indians' relationship with horses enriched them. For a very long time, the Native American tribes living on the Western prairies relied on dogs pulling travois as their beasts of burden. They hunted buffalo on foot, a dangerous pursuit only possible when many people worked together. In the 16th century, Spanish explorers brought horses to the New World in order to dominate and frighten the Indians, but gradually, as the horses reproduced, escaped and spread, the Indians used horses to transform their world. Horses gave them power and freedom: They could carry much larger loads much faster than dogs. Better still, they could be used in battle. A single warrior on horseback could bring down a buffalo. A mounted raiding party could attack suddenly and retreat with equal swiftness. Horses transformed Indian art and spirituality as well, and, in fact, are still an important part of Plains Indian tribal culture. Patent's prose is, as always, clear and readable. Munoz's color photographs show the prairie and tribes as they exist today; in addition, the book uses black-and-white historic photographs that, while grainy, show the West the way it used to be. Very well done; an important resource. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547533070
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
07/10/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
823,664
Lexile:
1200L (what's this?)
File size:
30 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Certain to draw readers who are interested in Native American history or horses, making it a good choice for middle level collections."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Simple language and clear organization help readers fully engage with the material."—Horn Book

"Very well done; and important resource."—Kirkus

 "Thoroughly entertaining . . . readers will easily sit back and enjoy the fun."—Booklist

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