The Hound of the Baskervilles

( 68 )

Overview

Could the sudden death of Sir Charles Baskerville have been caused by the gigantic ghostly hound which is said to have haunted his family for generations? Arch-rationalist Sherlock Holmes characteristically dismisses the theory as nonsense. Claiming to be immersed in another case, he sends Watson to Devon to protect the Baskerville heir and to observe the suspects at close hand.

When a second member of the Baskerville family dies, Sherlock Holmes investigates and ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $2.43   
  • New (1) from $60.43   
  • Used (2) from $2.43   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$60.43
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(7)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2011 Paperback New Book New and in stock. 6/1/2011. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you ... will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Morden, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Hound of the Baskervilles

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$2.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Could the sudden death of Sir Charles Baskerville have been caused by the gigantic ghostly hound which is said to have haunted his family for generations? Arch-rationalist Sherlock Holmes characteristically dismisses the theory as nonsense. Claiming to be immersed in another case, he sends Watson to Devon to protect the Baskerville heir and to observe the suspects at close hand.

When a second member of the Baskerville family dies, Sherlock Holmes investigates and finds murderous greed behind the supposed curse.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The whole Sherlock Holmes saga is a triumphant illustration of art’s supremacy over life.” —Christopher Morley
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781444807134
  • Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print Books, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 6/1/2011
  • Series: Sherlock Holmes Series
  • Edition description: Large Print Edition
  • Pages: 273
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born on May 22, 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland. In 1885, he graduated with a degree in medicine from Edinburgh University. Shortly after, Conan Doyle opened a successful medical practice in England. While there, he married Louise Hawkins, and the couple soon had two children, Mary Louise and Alleyne Kingsley. Meanwhile, Conan Doyle published several stories including A Study in Scarlet in 1887. This was the first story to feature the character Sherlock Holmes. Before his death on July 7, 1930, Conan Doyle wrote 55 more tales about the world's most famous detective.

Daniel Perez was born in Monterrey, Mexico, in 1977. For more than a decade, Perez has worked as a colorist and an illustrator for comic book publishers such as Marvel, Image, and Dark Horse. He currently works for Protobunker Studio while also developing his first graphic novel.

Since 1986, Martin Powell has been a freelance writer. He has written hundreds of stories, many of which have been published by Disney, Marvel, Tekno comix, Moonstone Books, and others. In 1989, Powell received an Eisner Award nomination for his graphic novel Scarlet in Gaslight. This award is one of the highest comic book honors.

Biography

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, receiving a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe's detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world's best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed.

Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur -- he had been knighted for this defense of the British cause in his The Great Boer War -- became an ardent Spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 22, 1859
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      July 7, 1930
    2. Place of Death:
      Crowborough, Sussex, England

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER I
Mr. Sherlock Holmes

Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he stayed up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before. It was a fine, thick piece of wood, bulbous-headed, of the sort which is known as a “Penang lawyer.” Just under the head was a broad silver band, nearly an inch across. “To James Mortimer, M.R.C.S., from his friends of the C.C.H.,” was engraved upon it, with the date “1884.” It was just such a stick as the old-fashioned family practitioner used to carry—dignified, solid, and reassuring. “Well, Watson, what do you make of it?” Holmes was sitting with his back to me, and I had given him no sign of my occupation. “How did you know what I was doing? I believe you have eyes in the back of your head.” “I have, at least, a well-polished, silver-plated coffee-pot in front of me,” said he. “But, tell me, Watson, what do you make of our visitor’s stick? Since we have been so unfortunate as to miss him and have no notion of his errand, this accidental souvenir becomes of importance. Let me hear you reconstruct the man by an examination of it.” “I think,” said I, following so far as I could the methods of my companion, “that Dr. Mortimer is a successful elderly medical man, well-esteemed, since those who know him give him this mark of their appreciation.” “Good!” said Holmes. “Excellent!” “I think also that the probabilityis in favour of his being a country practitioner who does a great deal of his visiting on foot.” “Why so?” “Because this stick, though originally a very handsome one, has been so knocked about that I can hardly imagine a town practitioner carrying it. The thick iron ferrule is worn down, so it is evident that he has done a great amount of walking with it.” “Perfectly sound!” said Holmes. “And then again, there is the ‘friends of the C.C.H.’ I should guess that to be the Something Hunt, the local hunt to whose members he has possibly given some surgical assistance, and which has made him a small presentation in return.” “Really, Watson, you excel yourself,” said Holmes, pushing back his chair and lighting a cigarette. “I am bound to say that in all the accounts which you have been so good as to give of my own small achievements you have habitually underrated your own abilities. It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. I confess, my dear fellow, that I am very much in your debt.” He had never said as much before, and I must admit that his words gave me keen pleasure, for I had often been piqued by his indifference to my admiration and to the attempts which I had made to give publicity to his methods. I was proud, too, to think that I had so far mastered his system as to apply it in a way which earned his approval. He now took the stick from my hands and examined it for a few minutes with his naked eyes. Then, with an expression of interest, he laid down his cigarette, and, carrying the cane to the window, he looked over it again with a convex lens. “Interesting, though elementary,” said he, as he returned to his favourite corner of the settee. “There are certainly one or two indications upon the stick. It gives us the basis for several deductions.” “Has anything escaped me?” I asked, with some self-importance. “I trust that there is nothing of consequence which I have overlooked?” “I am afraid, my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous. When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth. Not that you are entirely wrong in this instance. The man is certainly a country practitioner. And he walks a good deal.” “Then I was right.” “To that extent.” “But that was all.” “No, no, my dear Watson, not all—by no means all. I would suggest, for example, that a presentation to a doctor is more likely to come from an hospital than from a hunt, and that when the initials ‘C.C.’ are placed before that hospital the words ‘Charing Cross’ very naturally suggest themselves.” “You may be right.” “The probability lies in that direction. And if we take this as a working hypothesis we have a fresh basis from which to start our construction of this unknown visitor.” “Well, then, supposing that ‘C.C.H.’ does stand for ‘Charing Cross Hospital,’ what further inferences may we draw?” “Do none suggest themselves? You know my methods. Apply them!” “I can only think of the obvious conclusion that the man has practised in town before going to the country.” “I think that we might venture a little farther than this. Look at it in this light. On what occasion would it be most probable that such a presentation would be made? When would his friends unite to give him a pledge of their good will? Obviously at the moment when Dr. Mortimer withdrew from the service of the hospital in order to start in practice for himself. We know there has been a presentation. We believe there has been a change from a town hospital to a country practice. Is it, then, stretching our inference too far to say that the presentation was on the occasion of the change?” “It certainly seems probable.” “Now, you will observe that he could not have been on the staff of the hospital, since only a man well-established in a London practice could hold such a position, and such a one would not drift into the country. What was he, then? If he was in the hospital and yet not on the staff, he could only have been a house-surgeon or a house-physician—little more than a senior student. And he left five years ago—the date is on the stick. So your grave, middle-aged family practitioner vanishes into thin air, my dear Watson, and there emerges a young fellow under thirty, amiable, unambitious, absent-minded, and the possessor of a favourite dog, which I should describe roughly as being larger than a terrier and smaller than a mastiff.” I laughed incredulously as Sherlock Holmes leaned back in his settee and blew little wavering rings of smoke up to the ceiling. “As to the latter part, I have no means of checking you,” said I, “but at least it is not difficult to find out a few particulars about the man’s age and professional career.” From my small medical shelf I took down the Medical Directory and turned up the name. There were several Mortimers, but only one who could be our visitor. I read his record aloud. “Mortimer, James, M.R.C.S., 1882, Grimpen, Dartmoor,Devon. House surgeon, from 1882 to 1884, at Charing Cross Hospital. Winner of the Jackson Prize for Comparative Pathology, with essay entitled ‘Is Disease a Reversion?’ Corresponding member of the Swedish Pathological Society. Author of ‘Some Freaks of Atavism’ (Lancet, 1882). ‘Do We Progress? (Journal of Psychology, March, 1883). Medical Officer for the parishes of Grimpen, Thorsley, and High Barrow.” “No mention of that local hunt, Watson,” said Holmes, with a mischievous smile, “but a country doctor, as you very astutely observed. I think that I am fairly justified in my inferences. As to the adjectives, I said, if I remember right, amiable, unambitious, and absent-minded. It is my experience that it is only an amiable man in this world who receives testimonials, only an unambitious one who abandons a London career for the country, and only an absent-minded one who leaves his stick and not his visiting-card after waiting an hour in your room.” “And the dog?” “Has been in the habit of carrying this stick behind his master. Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle, and the marks of his teeth are very plainly visible. The dog’s jaw, as shown in the space between these marks, is too broad in my opinion for a terrier and not broad enough for a mastiff. It may have been—yes, by Jove, it is a curly-haired spaniel.” He had risen and paced the room as he spoke. Now he halted in the recess of the window. There was such a ring of conviction in his voice that I glanced up in surprise. “My dear fellow, how can you possibly be so sure of that?”

Copyright 2002 by Arthur Conan Doyle Introduction by Laurie R. King
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
1 Mr. Sherlock Holmes 1
2 The Curse of the Baskervilles 11
3 The Problem 27
4 Sir Henry Baskerville 41
5 Three Broken Threads 59
6 Baskerville Hall 74
7 The Stapletons of Merripit House 88
8 First Report of Dr. Watson 108
9 Second Report of Dr. Watson 119
10 Extract from the Diary of Dr. Watson 145
11 The Man on the Tor 160
12 Death on the Moor 179
13 Fixing the Nets 197
14 The Hound of the Baskervilles 214
15 A Retrospection 231
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 68 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(36)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 16, 2012

    Surprisingly good Title.

    Upon reading the first few paragraphs of the novel, I did not think I would bear reading the entire thing. It features mildly complicated vocabulary and is spoken in an English which I am not too familiar with. Yet, putting this aside I found the story to be quite interesting and even had me wanting to read the next chapter right then at some points. The mystery and suspense of the story for most parts keeps it slow-paced. But, there are scenes of the novel which display fast-paced and even violent action. Again, to my surprise the novel drew me in and kept me all the way through!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2013

    My first sherlock holmes book

    I am 12 years old, sixth grade. I am reading this book in my literature circles. Although I am only about half way through the book, I can definately say it is a great book. We have to read 9 novels by the end of the year (we only get to choose from a certain pile of nine books) and i have to admit, this was one of my last picks, i was really hesitant to read it. I have now learned that i do not only like girl stories and romance novels among funny books, but now i have been exposed to a whole nother world of literature. For this, i very much thank my teacher. Now, reguarding the actual book, I am very much enjoying it. I do have to admit that some words i need to look up, but that is easy on nook! It really grabs your attention in some parts, but sometimes, more in the beginning, you can get a little bored. Many people say that kids cannot enjoy these books, they are wrong! ~alicia s.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    The Hound Of The Baskervilles

    Amazing!!! Highly recommended!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 9, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Great

    Highly recommended!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2011

    I didn't like it.

    The story dragged on and on using too many unnessecary words. It was poop.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    You Won't See It Coming!

    I can recommend this book to most who enjoy the dry wit of Sherlock Holmes novels. I advise you to start with "A Letter In Scarlet" if you have not yet read it because out of his four novels you should start at the beginning. I'm happy to say the deductive reasoning and plot twists that come with all Holmes' escapades transcends into this book no less diminished. I'm not out to ruin any plot twists but you won't see them coming. You may expect one thing, but from around a corner Holmes will correct you with his cold hard decisive perceptional skills. And thats what makes it an Arthur Conan Doyle novel a shrewd parched novel devoid of emotional thoughts and feelings. This will be a safe assumption for all of the Sherlock Holmes novels.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 29, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Sherlock is my hero!

    I think it was Sherlock Holmes that taught me logical thinking and that has gotten me in trouble for quite a while!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2014

    REALLY BORING

    I have to read this novel for school. & its really boring. It uses ALOT of extra words. It takes one chapter to talk about a stick.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    In this particular adventure, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson dea

    In this particular adventure, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson deal with a legendary hound who kills Baskervilles family members, a curse that Holmes and Dr. Watson are not buying into it. After the death of Charles Baskerville from pure terror, the legend get strength and the heir of the state (Hugo Baskerville) asks for Holmes help to solve the mystery involving his uncle's death. Dr. Watson accompanies Hugo at Baskerville Hall in Devonshire, as Holmes have to stay in London so finish some other cases he is working on. While there, Watson hear on the moor the creepy sound of a hound... All the relationship with the neighbors and the employees of the house are well developed and the surprising appearance of Holmes just in time to prevent another crime is superb. 
    If you enjoy reading mystery stories, definitely you cannot miss this one, a classic among mystery stories. Very entertaining and with surprising twists on the plot, it took me around 4 hours to read the whole book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    Major disaster in San Franscisco kills people on Golden Gate

    A 9.7earthquake struck San Franscisco this morning at10:00
    in the morning. It was the deadliest earthquake in the world, it split California in half. It also split the Golden Gate Bridge in half, causing a major tsunami towards Japans capital city
    Tokyo. There were no survivors in the collaps of the bridge
    there was an explosion while the bridge collapsed. We should all pray for the people that were killed in this natural disaster.

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Do NOT read the free ebook.  The OCR is terrible.  Get the real

    Do NOT read the free ebook.  The OCR is terrible.  Get the real book.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2002

    Exellent

    Very good

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2001

    umm i like it allot

    I didn't like this book, cause i had trouble reading it. It was boring, a little slow and i think i loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2000

    fab book!!!!!!!!!

    this was another great book. i really enjoyed it. the way Sherlock and Watson plunge headfirst into the mystery is superb. Doyle has described every inch of the mystery so vividly i feel like i've actually seen it! Doyle does another work of art and i say that Doyle's one of the world's most exalted writers!! you gotta read this! thrown into a web of malice, greed and DEATH, Sherlock Holmes must cross all limits to bring this to justice!!!!! (P.S. i sound like an ad for the book, right? HAHAHA!!!!!!)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2000

    Penguin13 reviews a 'jolly good mystery!'

    This book had a very good beginning. Doyle did not hesitate to plunge right into the 'meat' of the story. I found the manuscript from 1742 amusing. This book is what I would call classic mystery. You've got your family curse, famous detective, trusty sidekick, good, evil, etc. You may think that this would be dull and monotonous- as I thought. However, I was pleasantly surprised with my immediate 'attraction' to these characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2000

    Spooky!

    I read this book when I was in the 6th grade. It scared the hell out of me. I highly suggest reading this fantastic story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2000

    Real Addictive!

    I couldn't go to bed before I finished reading the book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2000

    Surprising

    I am a sixth grader at Trinity Prep and our teacher made us read this book. I read it and was completely amazed. I really liked it. And I enjoy few books. So this was a great surprise.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 1999

    Superior Holmes

    Since reading this as an assigned book in grade school I have revisited it every so often and it's always good to curl up with an old friend and be transported to another place and time. There's no mystery to it for me, but I envy first time readers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)