The House That Love Built: The Story of Linda & Millard Fuller, Founders of Habitat for Humanity and the Fuller Center for Housing

Overview

In the hearts of volunteers who mobilize resources to build houses, "Habitat for Humanity" signifies caring. However, few people know that thirty years ago, successful entrepreneur Millard Fuller and his wife Linda left behind their materialistic lifestyle and crumbling marriage to start over as missionaries in Zaire. Upon returning to Georgia, they started building houses to bring new life to the poverty-stricken as their personal Christian ministry.

Millard recruited Jimmy ...

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Overview

In the hearts of volunteers who mobilize resources to build houses, "Habitat for Humanity" signifies caring. However, few people know that thirty years ago, successful entrepreneur Millard Fuller and his wife Linda left behind their materialistic lifestyle and crumbling marriage to start over as missionaries in Zaire. Upon returning to Georgia, they started building houses to bring new life to the poverty-stricken as their personal Christian ministry.

Millard recruited Jimmy Carter to work with Habitat when he left the White House. Together they attracted leaders from church and state worldwide. Habitat became an international movement with 1700 affiliates and a Board of Directors comprised of increasingly large corporate donors. As it grew, a new, more secular vision evolved, and eventually Millard and Linda found themselves alone starting over. The Fullers responded with "God is not done with us." Within days, they were back raising money and building houses for The Fuller Center for Housing-- for Katrina victims and in Nepal, Nigeria, and Romania.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781571745460
  • Publisher: Hampton Roads Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/2007
  • Series: Bettie youngs Bks
  • Pages: 424
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.40 (d)

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The House That Love Built

The Story of Millard and Linda Fuller, Founders of Habitat for Humanity and the Fuller Center for Housing


By Bettie B. Youngs

Hampton Roads Publishing Company, Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Bettie B. Youngs
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-61283-049-0



CHAPTER 1

Young Millard Fuller


When Millard was six, in 1941, his father gave him a pig and told him to fatten it for market, telling him he could keep the money.

His father, an independent grocer just outside a little town called Lanett, Alabama—"serving the community of Coleville and surrounding area"—sold feed to his son on credit. He helped Millard with record-keeping, showing him how to keep accurate records. When the hog was the desired weight of two hundred pounds, they took him to market. True to what his father had told him, he gave young Millard the proceeds from the sale of the hog. The profit: $11.

His father then helped Millard select a male and a female pig so that he could raise, in Millard's words, a "bunch of pigs." Motivated to repeat the success he had achieved with the first hog, Millard was dutiful about keeping the fences mended and plenty of table scraps along with bagged feed for the pigs to eat. Millard continued raising and selling pigs until junior high school. "Almost every hog I raised brought more profit and I faithfully put the money into a savings account," Millard recalls. He decided to invest in rabbits. Over three years, he built up a population of over a hundred rabbits. He sold dressed rabbits to restaurants and in his father's store, and sold live baby rabbits to children for pets. "I especially did a booming business in selling young live rabbits around Easter time," Millard would report. Still, the rabbit business had its problems. Sometimes the rabbits would develop a severe case of ear sores. Huge scaly patches would develop in both ears and the condition would cause their ears to droop. "No one wanted a droopy-eared rabbit," Millard recalls. Ever the problem solver, he discovered that if he applied a 2% solution of salicylic acid to the sore ear, the cure was complete and amazingly fast. "Almost overnight all the droopy ears perked up and I had decent-looking rabbits again," he cheerfully explained.

"Another problem with raising rabbits," said Millard, "is that stray dogs wanted to kill them." One night they ripped open a pen of rabbits, devouring fourteen of them. Millard was broken-hearted—but his father was furious. The next day young Millard came home from school to discover his father sitting on the back porch, with a rifle across his lap. In front of him was a pile of dead dogs. "I've got fourteen dogs so far," he announced. "My father had been sitting there all day with that rifle, shooting every dog that came by," Millard lamented. Then he added with a grin, "Thankfully, none of the dogs belonged to neighbors! But, we didn't have any more problems with dogs eating my rabbits."

Ear sores and predatory dogs aside, it was a rattlesnake that convinced Millard to get out of the rabbit business for good and to look for a less problematic venture. One evening as Millard was filling a pail of water behind the family home to water the rabbits, he turned on the spigot and stepped back—onto a rattlesnake. The snake bit, Millard cried out in pain, and his stepmother came running to the rescue, as did a lather-faced neighbor in the midst of shaving, straight-razor still in his hand. Millard's foot was slashed open with the razor, and his foot thrust into a pail of kerosene to draw out the poison. "I bled so much it looked like an old-fashioned hog-killin'," Millard said, "but when my father took me to the hospital, the doctor took one look and told my father, 'You've done all that needs to be done; he'll be fine now.' That pretty much killed my desire to raise any more rabbits." Millard promptly sold his rabbits and used the proceeds to buy fifteen cows.

The young entrepreneur continued to expand his experience in different business ventures with the encouragement of his father. Millard helped his father in the grocery store, delivering orders of groceries on a bicycle until he got a driver's license. "I really hated the grocery business," Millard admits, "but I loved the time with my father. He spent a lot of time with me. My mother had died suddenly when I was three and he tried to be both dad and mom to me. When I was six, my father remarried a wonderful woman and I was blessed with two half-brothers. But it was from my father that I developed a real love for business and for making money, long before I even graduated from high school. He encouraged and motivated me. He taught me to be self-reliant and self-starting and to be thrifty and saving. 'A dollar saved is a dollar earned,' he'd say. A dollar was important to my father and he worked for his. But he was generous and would open his pocketbook for any person in need. He had as big a heart as any man I've ever known. And he loved children: Hundreds and hundreds of times I'd see him pick up a child in his store and hold the child over the cookie jar he always kept on the counter and let the child take all he could hold. Always he beamed as he watched the child walk out of the store with his two hands packed full of cookies. I just loved that about him. I truly loved him with all my heart."

Millard continued to keep books and turn a dollar into two, and then into three. In high school, he joined Junior Achievement whose mission was to teach teenagers about free enterprise. Millard learned to set up a miniature corporation and go into business. He learned to produce a product, sell stock, make a profit, and liquidate the company at the end of the school year. One summer he worked the "graveyard shift" (11:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m.) at Lanett Bleachery & Dye Works and also caught minnows in country creeks. He dug a little pool beside his father's store to keep them alive and sold the minnows to fishermen for bait.

By the end of his senior year in high school, his mind set on growing a business one day, Millard set about putting him-self through college. "I knew I wanted to go into business, and I wanted it to be big, profitable, and successful," Millard recalls. "I wanted to be rich, and knew I would be." The drive to be successful motivated Millard to test the waters of various occupations the following summer.

In Detroit, Michigan, he tried his hand in one of the automobile factories, choosing the job because of the opportunity to make good money and the experience of working in a large company. His Aunt Avis lived there with her husband and family. He got a job at the Gemmer Steering Gear Factory, operating a drill press on the second shift. In this position, a gear mechanism would be handed to him from the man on his right. Millard would place it under a drill press and pull the handle down. That would drill out a hole. Then Millard would pass the mechanism on to the man on his left for him to drill a hole somewhere else. "It definitely was not the most interesting job I've held," Millard said. "As a matter of fact, it was more boring than I could stand."

A few days later he found a second job, as a door-to-door salesman of ladies hosiery and undergarments for Real Silk Hosiery Company. He did his selling in the mornings and early afternoons and then went to work at Gemmer Steering Gear Factory. "I learned a whole lot about the psychology of selling from my employment with Real Silk Hosiery Company," Millard said, "but I wouldn't say I loved this job either."

Within weeks, Millard was weary of the job at the Gemmer Steering Gear Factory. He told his Aunt Avis good-bye and thumbed his way to the upper peninsula of Michigan, hoping to get a job working on the bridge that was being built across the Straits of Mackinac. That search was unsuccessful, so he headed to Flint, Michigan. There, he worked at a bakery, helping unload flour from a railroad car.

A second job in Flint was with a small company that built houses. It was vigorous outside work and Millard loved it. "I met a real character in this job," Millard says with a laugh. "The guy's name was Bob, a guy who was long on friendliness and talking, but short on brains and memory. Seems that Bob had a problem remembering people's names, so he called everyone 'Shorty.' When he needed someone to do something, he simply yelled out, 'Hey, Shorty ... do this or that, bring this or take that.' So every worker had to look up when he yelled 'Shorty,' because no one knew to whom the guy was talking."

As is his nature, Millard decided to help the guy out by teaching Bob to remember his name. "Bob," he said, "my name is not 'Shorty,' it is 'Millard.' Here's how you can remember that: I'm sure you've heard of Willard Batteries. So when you want to call me, think of a battery. Then think of Willard. Last of all, turn the 'W' upside down and that makes it an 'M,' for Millard. Call me by that name, 'Millard.'" Bob agreed to do that, but even so, when he wanted to get Millard's attention, continued to call out, "Hey, Shorty!" Millard decided not to answer him and so Bob would quickly say, "I mean, Hey, You!" Determined to get Bob to think deeper, Millard took to ignoring Bob completely. Frustrated, Bob then yelled out, "Okay, I know your name has something to do with a battery. Is your name Eveready?" Peals of laughter erupted from the men around, but ole Bob, no matter how hard he tried, could never remember the name "Millard." "I did not succeed teaching Bob how to remember my name," Millard concluded, "but I sure tried!"

If ever Millard needed confirmation that he wanted to "make it big" in a company of his own, that summer provided it. After a few weeks of work in Chicago delivering furniture for the Goldblatt's Department Store, Millard bought a second-hand Plymouth automobile and drove south to Alabama, thus bringing to a close his "work-travel" summer!


Auburn University

September was upon him, and Millard turned his attention to college. He decided upon Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama, not far from where he had been raised in Lanett. He approached his college education much the way he had his employment experiences during the summer. With his eyes set on the prize of success, he was an eager student, absorbing all he could that would help him achieve his goal of wealth and prosperity. He started working toward a degree in agricultural engineering, but decided that designing farm machinery was not for him, so switched majors and would eventually earn a degree in economics with a minor in mathematics and physics.

At Auburn, Millard was characteristically involved in campus activities. He wrote a column for the student newspaper The Plainsman. At age nineteen, he became the program director for Junior Achievement in nearby Opelika, Alabama, making him the youngest program director of that organization in the United States. Foreshadowing his ability to make a career out of being persuasive, Millard entered into a campus-wide debate with a fellow student, William Callahan, on the topic of "Resolved, that the states shall have the right to nullify a Federal Supreme Court decision." They argued on both sides of the issue and won first place in the competition.

When he discovered there was only one political party on campus, Millard organized a new political party, the War Eagle Party, and then ran for president of the student body, organizing such a successful campaign that he came within a few votes of winning. That experience, plus taking a political science course at Auburn, whetted his appetite for national politics. With the help of a professor, Millard qualified to run for alternate delegate to the Democratic National Convention, which in 1956 was held in Chicago. Having no money, Millard had to hitchhike to Chicago to attend the convention. On his first day at the convention, the man for whom he was alternate had to leave because of a family emergency. Millard became a full delegate. He met John Kennedy along with many other political figures—quite an amazing experience for a twenty-one-year-old!

But no experience could have been more indicative of his penchant for creating business opportunities than when he got involved in a profitable enterprise with Donald Moore, a distant cousin and fellow Auburn student. Taking note that the trees on campus were loaded down with mistletoe, Donald and Millard decided to pluck, package, and sell it. They got permission to cut it, then rigged up sharp hooks on long canes and started clipping the mistletoe. Their sales were good, but limited to what they could sell personally. Mistletoe would figure into Millard's future business ventures again with a new partner and would lead to the most financially successful time of his young life.


An Eye on the Future

On June 4, 1957, Millard graduated from Auburn University. During his senior year, he had interviewed with several companies and had seriously considered accepting a job with Babcock and Wilcox Steam Boiler Company, Creole Petroleum (in Venezuela), or a bank in Mobile, Alabama. But nothing had clicked with him. Sitting in the Student Union building one day, a fellow student, Jim Gullage, came by and told him that he'd be taking the Law School Aptitude test at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa the next day, and would he like to go along? Millard agreed to go with him, reasoning that law school would be helpful in either a business or political career—or anything else for that matter. Six days after graduating with an economics degree from Auburn, Millard found himself enrolled in the University of Alabama Law School.

There Millard attended a meeting of the Young Democrats and met a student named Morris Dees, a sharply dressed, fit young man with curly blond hair. The two hit it off and afterward, Morris offered Millard a ride home. Their conversation turned to business. The two young men discovered they had much in common. Both had been reared in rural Alabama. Morris, too, had raised cattle. He was interested in politics and, as a schoolboy, had engaged in various enterprises. And he had long dreamed of developing some kind of business. Idea after idea, the two students discussed various projects and how they could be made profitable. On and on they talked. Before either of them realized it, it was 2:00 a.m. Agreeing that they would be partners, the young men shook hands and said good night—neither knowing they'd be inseparable for the next eight years, but believing that they'd help one another "get rich."

Get rich they did. After years of growing a successful business with Morris, young Millard Fuller would become a wealthy, experienced businessman with an eye ever on growth and the future. This singular drive, when refocused years later, would absorb his time, passion, and commitment, and would improve living conditions for millions of people. Millard would turn his business acumen toward the pursuit of a new goal: to eliminate poverty housing worldwide. As the founder of Habitat for Humanity and The Fuller Center for Housing, he would make it his goal to convince people in every country on Earth to join in the movement that makes decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. It would not be a goal he could accomplish alone—hundreds of thousands of volunteers would be needed in this quest to build and finance simple, decent homes for all the world's poor. He would need to rely on his extraordinary charisma to persuade people, his seemingly endless supply of energy and creativity, and his unusual ability to remain focused through the most egregious distractions. All of these skills so invaluable in leading a movement would be discovered, practiced, and honed over many years and under wildly diverse conditions—from the wealthy neighborhoods of Montgomery, Alabama, to the shacks of urban Zaire; from muddy construction sites to corporate boardrooms. And from inspirational leader to slandered figurehead.

But before Millard was ready to take on an international housing movement and all that came with it, he would go through a process of growth, deconstruction, and reconciliation that would make him the man he is today, a faithful servant working in partnership with God to change the lives of millions of people around the world, and thus, one of the most revered men of the twentieth century.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The House That Love Built by Bettie B. Youngs. Copyright © 2007 Bettie B. Youngs. Excerpted by permission of Hampton Roads Publishing Company, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents


Acknowledgments,

Foreword,

A Word from the Author,

CHAPTER 1: Young Millard Fuller,

CHAPTER 2: Fuller & Dees,

CHAPTER 3: The Beginning of a Love Story,

CHAPTER 4: Building a Personal Fortune,

CHAPTER 5: An Affair Changes Lives,

CHAPTER 6: The Decision to Downsize,

CHAPTER 7: One Month at Koinonia,

CHAPTER 8: A Growing Awareness of Injustice and Need,

CHAPTER 9: The Idea of Partnership Housing,

CHAPTER 10: Partnership Housing Goes to Africa,

CHAPTER 11: Habitat for Humanity Is Born,

CHAPTER 12: Financing Houses: The Economics of Jesus,

CHAPTER 13: Habitat's Childhood,

CHAPTER 14: Habitat's Seventh Year Birthday Bash: The Indy 700 Walk,

CHAPTER 15: President Carter Becomes Habitat's Most Famous Volunteer,

CHAPTER 16: Growing a Movement,

CHAPTER 17: Expanding the Dream,

CHAPTER 18: Controversy,

CHAPTER 19: 100,000th House ... and Picking Up Speed,

CHAPTER 20: An Allegation and Ensuing Investigation,

CHAPTER 21: April 2004: The New York Meetings,

CHAPTER 22: "On the Edge of a Cliff ...",

CHAPTER 23: President Carter Mediates,

CHAPTER 24: The International Board Meeting: Mexico City (June 10, 2004),

CHAPTER 25: The Coup d'État,

CHAPTER 26: Second Mediation: President Carter,

CHAPTER 27: The Affiliates Find Their Voice,

CHAPTER 28: The (Hostile) Takeover Is Complete,

CHAPTER 29: The Calling Continues,

CHAPTER 30: A New Organization: The Fuller Center for Housing,

CHAPTER 31: The Fuller Center for Housing's First Projects,

CHAPTER 32: Responding to Needs at Home and Abroad,

POSTSCRIPT: By Mack McCarter,

APPENDIX A: Millard and Linda Fuller Timeline,

APPENDIX B: Awards and Biographical Information,

APPENDIX C: Supporting Documents,

Index,

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2008

    Life Changing!

    Millard and Linda Fullers life is a continual reminder of what God would have us do - lay down our lives so that we might truly live!!! The House That Love Built tells the story in such a glaring truth-filled manner that you can't help but want to follow in the challenging yet joy-filled way. READ, GROW and ENJOY. Kimberly L. Smith President Make Way Partners

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2008

    Giving Back Their Dreams

    What an amazing couple. What a huge impact they've had on this planet, and what a difference they have made in the lives of so many people. Bringing hope to people in poverty, and despair. It's so hard to even see the possibilities that are there, when one has lost all hope. Millard & Linda didn't just put roofs over their heads, they gave them hope. You have to be able to dream it, or envision it, before you can do it. They most assuredly gave them back their dreams.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2008

    A beautiful story about beautiful people!

    The House that Love Built is truly a gift. Ms. Youngs follows the story of the Fullers and their founding of Habitat for Humanity and the Fuller Center with care and dignity in a way that makes you want to keep reading long after you finish the last line. It's not only a book that tells, it is a book that teaches us how faith, love, and trust are really what turns this world around--not money, property, and investments. In what is sadly becoming a 'what's mine is mine' world, the Fullers shine like a rare jewel, showing us what the world could be with a little hard work and a lot more kindness and warmth among humankind: 'what's ours is everyone's.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2008

    A Beautiful Story & Inspiration

    Having known the Fullers for several years, this beautifully written account of their lives allows readers to know just how wonderul, giving and exemplary servants to our Lord they are and which we should all aspire to. Their dedication to the mission of housing the poor and perseverance is awe inspiring especially in light of the injustices they have endured.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2007

    A reviewer

    Mildred Fuller has lived a life of convictions to bring hope and a future to those who needed it most. The embodiment of that belief is reflected in his unwavering commitment to the homeless across this globe. This book gives an in-depth look into the heart and soul of a modern day saint. Bettie Youngs espouses truth and clarity with the foundation Millard gave birth to. This book challenges us all to stand by our faith and our dedication to the principles of ethic and integrity. Mildred's love for life, family and others is brought to life in this book. You wonâ¿¿t put this book down, it is a page turner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    A True Love Story

    Millard and Linda Fuller have had personal battles in their past, but they came to realize what is the most important ingredient in their lives, Love! They have triumphed and started two amazing companies from the ground up. Unfortunately, Habitat for Humanity has gone 'corporate' and has come down to only dollar signs, but out of that the Fuller Center for Housing came and again they are helping one family after another to be able to live better, happier and healthier lives with a roof over their heads. So many people have been blessed to have a home built for them and they have, and will rise to become part of our world¿s great future. Bettie, thank you for writing such a wonderful account of the Fuller¿s lives, this truly is a Great Love Story. Thank you Millard and Linda for all that you have done and all that you do and plan to do in your futures, you are two very inspiring people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    A reviewer

    Whether you know Millard & Linda Fuller or not, just read the first few pages of the book, I bet it will engage you to read more... Bettie Youngs has done a excellent job in bringing to life the true and inspiring story of the Fullers. Sam

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2007

    Definitely worth the read

    Fuller has become a household name. This book takes us into the home of that household name, giving us never-before-told details about the love story behind Habitat for Humanity, an endlessly fascinating and extremely well-told account. Read it and celebrate the joy! Greg Hunt, Pastor of First Baptist Church, Shreveport and Shreveport-Bossier Community Renewal board and Priscilla Hunt, the Association for Couples in Marriage Enrichment

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2007

    The ongoing journey of a great philanthropist!

    Bettie Youngs is a gifted raconteur, who has narrated the story of the Fullers in a magnificent manner. The House that Love Built gives the reader a vivid account of the victories and vicissitudes Millard Fuller, the greatest philanthropist of our time, has passed through. One wouldn¿t like to put off reading the book once begun. The biography tells us how we can practice virtues like perseverance, compassion, tolerance and sacrifice expected of a true, unswerving Christian. And we will find that behind Millard¿s success, too, there is a noble woman - Linda Fuller.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2007

    An Example of Living from the Heart

    I attended a conference recently and heard Millard Fuller speak. Intrigued by the glimpse of his life and work that he shared, I picked up a copy of `The House that Love Built¿ by Bettie Youngs. I could not put this book down. It is the story of a couple who pursued the American material dream and it nearly destroyed their lives. After honestly and deeply embracing the teachings of their faith, they decided to give their fortune away and dedicate their lives to selfless giving. Together they worked ceaselessly to found two successful non-profit organizations that to date, have provided homes for over 1 million people in need in the United States and throughout the world. It¿s really an amazing story. Read this book if you want to be inspired by people who are truly living from their hearts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2007

    Inspired by God

    Life is not always fair. This is the way I feel about Millard and Linda Fuller and their life's work with housing for the less fortunate. I have been a supporter and worked alongside Linda and Millard since the early 1980's. Their founding of Habitat for Humanity was inspired because of their Christian beliefs and challange to help people have a decent, affordable and dry home. This book by Bettie Youngs is such a true and touching account of the devotion to this mission and ultimate removal of The Fullers, and is beautifully, yet tragically told . If ever there had been a man who had 'been with God and challanged by God', this man is Millard Fuller along with his soul mate and devoted wife, Linda. The unfair treatment of The Fullers by Habitat for Humanity International is bitter as brine. The Fullers founded the organization and somehow, behind their backs, the Board of Directors of the organization began to see dollar signs for their personal gain....and the entire mission changed. Founded on volunteerism, brotherly love and compassion, it is just 'big business' now. The Fuller Center for Housing is now moving like rays of sun across the earth, and this book will enlighten you to desire to support The Fullers on their new mission. Bettie Youngs did a wonderful job.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2007

    Focused Visionary with Integrity

    Inspirational story about an unplanned life. Two passionate people with huge loving hearts followed their hearts into unplanned territory and set about to help the world ¿ one life at a time. The integrity to be and do that which gives their life purpose. To feel deeply and be vulnerable and still know beyond any shadow of doubt that love is all that really matters. To step out and do something good, believing along every step of the way that their vision for helping others would not be compromised. Read this book and be inspired. You don¿t have to go out and build houses ¿ although I am sure they can use the help. But believe in yourself, live with integrity, and be true to the vision that abides in your heart and help others. That¿s what I learned thru this book about Linda and Millard Fuller.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2007

    A Powerful Book of Faith, Love, and Humanity

    Millard and Linda Fuller's life story, so beautifully written, inspires you to put your dreams into reality. A refreshing new way of seeing the power of FAITH and how miracles really do happen when you come from the heart and believe in your good intentions. There is no end to what we can accomplish, and the Fuller's inspire us to open our world to bigger possibilities and how one dream can make a quantum difference in the world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    Courage, Faith, Focus Conquers All

    I often deal with people of faith who have been used by their Creator to achieve extraordinary things for a better world. But suddenly, they unfairly lose everything they have built overnight. Bettie Young's 'The House That Love Built' gives us a paradigm of how to respond. Her gift is wrapped in a page turner, beginning with a love story, moving on to describe one of the most inspired achievements of this generation, crescendoing with an aching account of a web of corporate intrigue entangling Habitat (one of our most beloved institutions) and ending with redemption. She shows how that great force that made it all possible---Love--- freed Habitat's founders, Millard and Linda Fuller, from corporate entanglement, and set them on a journey to accomplish something even greater---building housing worldwide for all at a grass roots level, with complete integrity, humility, faith, remarkable energy, and, above all, Love.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2007

    What a story!

    The House that Love Built tells the story of Millard and Linda Fuller¿s lives, the founders of Habitat for Humanity and The Fuller Center for Housing, from a very young age to the present. It is truly a touching, remarkable story! It is a story that starts with greed and ambition, progresses through separation and reconciliation, faith and generosity, community and life transformations, growth and excitement, and finally ends with a harsh parting that leads them to new beginnings. The incredible story takes the reader through Millard¿s youth, his and Linda¿s highly-unlikely first meeting, Millard¿s wildly successful business ventures that led him to become a millionaire without a family life, their decision to give it all away, their time at Koinonia Farm and as missionaries in Zaire, their founding and growing Habitat for Humanity as a grassroots Christian ministry, their controversial ouster by Habitat for Humanity International¿s Board of Directors, and their decision to continue their life¿s work through founding The Fuller Center for Housing. The story goes into detail regarding the controversial steps that led to Millard and Linda¿s firing from Habitat for Humanity. Despite a popular misconception that they were terminated due to a sexual harassment claim, the book ¿ with numerous supporting documents included in an appendix ¿ clarifies that the firing was because of disagreements and clashes with the corporate-leaning board of directors that came to a point around a highly unsubstantiated and suspect claim. Through extensive quotations, vignettes, pictures, and fascinating details, the author lets you feel as though you actually know Millard and Linda, and soon you find yourself coming to love and admire them ¿ just as countless volunteers and homeowner families have done over the years. If you don¿t want to believe that a couple of people moving out in faith can touch millions of lives, then don¿t read this book. Their story will inspire you ¿ it has me!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2007

    House That Love Built: The Untold Story of Linda & Millard Fuller, Founders of Habitat for Humanity and the Fuller Center for Housing

    A great read! A biography of Linda and Millard Fuller, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the National Jefferson Award, among many. This story details their parting with Habitat for Humanity World Headquarters and creation of The Fuller Center for Housing. Linda and Millard are national and international treasures! I'm buying at least 100 copies and giving them to family and friends! Not only a great read but a MUST read! I'm reading it for the third time! Buy it! You'll LOVE reading it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2007

    A reviewer

    Not only inspirational, it makes one pause and consider the path chosen to claim the american dream. What price glory? ---- we are conditioned to think success is money, property and prestige,--- after reading what millard fuller and his wife gave up to find the true meaning of success and fulfillment, i was inspired to consider the road less traveled. I loved the story as well as the clever writing style bettie b. Youngs used to unfold and beathe life into this untold treasure. I could not put it down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2007

    What a story

    The House That Love Built is a beautifully written story of a remarkable couple. The Fuller's story will inspire and make you believe!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    True Faith

    Millard and Linda Fuller and their call from the Holy Spirit within is one of the most heart-felt, moving manifestations I have had the privilege to vicariously witness through the power of the spoken word. Their story recounting their most prosperous moment¿s that resulted from undaunted service to humanity is riveting, as their inner-wealth floweth over with pure service. Truly he and his wife are one of life¿s gleaning examples of The Prayer of Jebez and the miraculous results of how one¿s boundaries and territories are blessedly extended to do God¿s work. The House that Love Built is a warm-hearted extension of Bettie Young¿s compassion, and charismatic enthusiasm that showcase exemplary individuals like the Fullers who, indeed, help us all remember the beauty and magic of a Spirit-lead and conscious life. Paula Marie Jackson, Founder, Love and Light From Within, Inc., La Jolla, California

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2007

    Revelation of Injustice Done to Millard Fuller

    Thank you, Bettie Youngs, for writing THE HOUSE THAT LOVE BUILT. I finally got to know the whole truth about the great injustice done to Millard Fuller. Talk about being persecuted for righteousness' sake, he was! It is a blessing to see how he and Linda responded, not with hatred and vengeance but with good will, still seeking to help and not compete with Habitat For Humanity. The Lord is a God of justice, and He will deal with the ones who treated the Fullers unjustly and ungratefully. My husband and I have been friends of the Fullers since 1969 and have read most of Millard's books, but in this book we discovered many more interesting things about them we did not know. This book reveals what we have always known, that Millard's character is impeccable, and his actions spring from a deep love for the Lord Jesus Christ and for his fellow man. Sadly, the lives of more and more Christian leaders in today's world are tainted with scandal. The House That Love Built is a book that helps restore confidence in Christians in public ministry. The book shows that true Christianity works. Forgiving your enemies can be a stepping stone to greater fruitfulness. I predict that the new Fuller Center for Housing will eventually eclipse the work of Habitat For Humanity, maybe not in the number of houses built, but in the number of changed lives for the kingdom of God.

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