The House Without a Key: A Charlie Chan Mystery [NOOK Book]

Overview

This is the classic novel in which Charlie Chan makes his debut as Inspector of the Honolulu Police Department. Earl Derr Biggers brings Honolulu to life with deft descriptions of the landscape and of its hybrid ethnic communities. With the creation of Detective Chan, Biggers also shatters stereotypes and is ahead of his time in highlighting the positive aspects of Chinese-Hawaiian culture, just as his skillful rendering of San Francisco is noteworthy of its modernity and keen ...
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The House Without a Key: A Charlie Chan Mystery

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Overview

This is the classic novel in which Charlie Chan makes his debut as Inspector of the Honolulu Police Department. Earl Derr Biggers brings Honolulu to life with deft descriptions of the landscape and of its hybrid ethnic communities. With the creation of Detective Chan, Biggers also shatters stereotypes and is ahead of his time in highlighting the positive aspects of Chinese-Hawaiian culture, just as his skillful rendering of San Francisco is noteworthy of its modernity and keen sense of place.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780897336420
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/1/2008
  • Series: Charlie Chan Mysteries , #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 286
  • Sales rank: 523,344
  • File size: 414 KB

Meet the Author

Earl Derr Biggers born in Warren, Ohio in 1884. He graduated from Harvard University in 1907, and lived for many years in California. He wrote six novels featuring detective Charlie Chan, who became a staple of the movies. He died in Pasadena, CA in 1933.
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Table of Contents

Title Page/INTRODUCTION/CHAPTER I/CHAPTER II/CHAPTER III/CHAPTER IV/CHAPTER V/CHAPTER VI/CHAPTER VII/CHAPTER VIII/CHAPTER IX/CHAPTER X/CHAPTER XI/CHAPTER XII/CHAPTER XIII/CHAPTER XIV/CHAPTER XV/CHAPTER XVI/CHAPTER XVII/CHAPTER XVIII/CHAPTER XIX/CHAPTER XX/CHAPTER XXI/CHAPTER XXII/CHAPTER XXIII
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2013

    Fabulous.

    Forget the movies. Read this instead!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2013

    Classic mystery fiction of the era

    This book is like a time machine back to when travelling was done on trains and ships and the "80's" referred to the 1880's. The writing is good and keeps the story moving along. If you like classic black and white Hollywood whodunnit films then the ambiance of those films can be found here. But unlike the Charlie Chan films the original characters here are much more three dimensional and likeable, less stereotypical. And the sense of Hawaii in the early 1900's that comes across in this book is golden.

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    A "MUST READ" for mystery lovers, or anyone who's been to Honolulu!

    The novel is a genuine classic. Written in 1925 its no wonder its being reissued again around 80 years later. Influenced by real life Honolulu Police Detective Chang Apana, it is historical as well as entertaining and a truly suspensful mystery. I found I could not put it down! The author, Earl D. Biggers, has a way of leaving the reader in anticipation at the end of each chapter. And the subplots, charater development, and romance of the islands, pacifiic ocean, and tropical setting are almost mystical. If you've read the exploits of Sherlock Holmes (I've read them all over and over), you need to discover his competition on the other side of the globe! To Mr. Biggers I can only quote the words of his famous detective..."Thank you so much"

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  • Posted February 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A good read

    For a book that was written in 1925 I think it's a very good read. What I really liked about the book was that description is not over used like so many books in the cozy market today. I really get tired of ready about what kind of flowers were placed in the vestibule or what kind of dress the heroine was wearing etc.. This book has a good story with acceptable characters. The only thing that I was surprised about was that Charlie Chan didn't do much until the very end. He didn't take much of an active role through most of the book, but of course it's hard not to compare this book with the movies where we Charlie Chan on every page. But I plan on reading the rest of the series.

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  • Posted December 30, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    In his first novel...

    Earl Biggers weaves a thrilling and indeed, dramatic story about Honolulu detective Charlie Chan in his first installment of the series. Charlie is intrduced in chapter 7 and quickly becomes a deep and loveable character. His ancient Chinese wisdom is always welcome and provides a great insight into the mind of this detective. Written in 1928, this is one classic you don't want to pass up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2005

    Charlie Chan's First Case

    Charlie Chan is introduced in Chapter VII of this first book of the popular series about an oriental detective from Honolulu. Although playing a minor role in the beginning, Charlie asserts himself by the end of the case. John Quincy Winterslip, a young lawyer from Boston, is on a trip to Hawaii to visit a wealthy relative, Dan Winterslip. Along the way he is asked to find and destroy an ohia wood box which is in the attic of Dan's San Francisco house.He fails to get the box and learns on his arrival in Hawaii that Dan has been murdered. The leading suspect is Jim Egan, owner of a ramshackle hotel on the beach. The essential clue is a wrist watch with an illuminated dial which is damaged. Motivated by the growing interest in Egan's daughter, Carlotta, John Quincy helps Charlie and the police solve the crime. The real hero, however, is Charlie who manages to stay one step ahead of everybody else. In 1932 Earl Biggers wrote a report to his Harvard classmates on the occasion of the twenty-fifth reunion of the class of 1907. He described how he happened to conceive of creating an ethnic Chinese detective for a mystery story set in Hawaii: 'But my memories of the islands were rather dim I dropped into a library to brighten them a bit by a perusal of recent Honolulu newspapers. In an obscure corner of an inside page, I found an item to the effect that a certain hapless Chinese, being too fond of opium, had been arrested by Sergeants Chang Apana and Lee Fook, of the Honolulu Police' Because of this chance reading of a newspaper item, Biggers was inspired to use Charlie Chan in THE HOUSE WITHOUT A KEY which was published in 1925 after running serially in the SATURDAY EVENING POST.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2005

    Charlie Chan's First Case

    Charlie Chan is introduced in Chapter VII of this first book of the popular series about an oriental detective from Honolulu. Although playing a minor role in the beginning, Charlie asserts himself by the end of the case. John Quincy Winterslip, a young lawyer from Boston, is on a trip to Hawaii to visit a wealthy relative, Dan Winterslip. En route he is asked to find and destroy an ohia wood box which is in the attic of Dan's San Francisco house. He fails to get the box and learns on his arrival in Hawaii that Dan has been murdered. The leading suspect is Jim Egan, owner of a ramshackle hotel on the beach. The essential clue is a watch with an illuminated dial which is damaged. Motivated by his growing interest in Egan's daughter Carlotta, John Quincy helps Charlie and the police solve the crime. The real hero, however, is Charlie who manages to stay one step ahead of everybody else. In 1932 Earl Biggers wrote a report to his Harvard classmates on the occasion of the twenty-fifth reunion of the class of 1907. He described how he happened to conceive of creating an ethnic Chinese detective for a mystery story set in Hawaii: 'But my memories of the islands were rather dim; I dropped into a library to brighten them a bit by a perusal of recent Honolulu newspapers. In an obscure corner of an inside page, I found an item to the effect that a certain hapless Chinese, being too fond of opium, had been arrested by Sergeants Chang Apana and Lee Fook, of the Honolulu Police.' Because of this chance reading of a newspaper item, Biggers was inspired to use Chan in THE HOUSE WITHOUT A KEY which was published in 1925 after running serially in the SATURDAY EVENING POST.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    Charlie Chan's First Appearance

    Charlie Chan is introduced in Chapter VII of this first book of the popular series about an oriental detective from Honolulu. Although playing a minor role in the beginning, Charlie asserts himself by the end of this case.In my opinion, THE HOUSE WITHOUT A KEY is the best of the six Chan novels written by Earl Biggers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2000

    Charlie Chan On Waikiki

    Charlie Chan is introduced in Chapter VII of this first book of the popular series about the oriental detective from Honolulu. Although playing a minor role in the beginning, Charlie asserts himself by the end of the case. The House Without A Key was produced on the screen in 1936 as a Pathe serial with George K. Kuwa in the role of Chan.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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