The Hundred Days Offensive: The Allies' Push to Win World War I

The Hundred Days Offensive: The Allies' Push to Win World War I

by Andrew Langley, Langley
     
 

Four years into World War I, millions of soldiers had died or been badly wounded, and neither side could gain a clear advantage in the bloody conflict. In August 1918, one year after the United States entered the war, Allied troops launched an attack near Amiens, France. It was the first of many Allied offensives that would take place all along the Western Front

Overview

Four years into World War I, millions of soldiers had died or been badly wounded, and neither side could gain a clear advantage in the bloody conflict. In August 1918, one year after the United States entered the war, Allied troops launched an attack near Amiens, France. It was the first of many Allied offensives that would take place all along the Western Front during the next 100 days. These small but significant attacks helped the Allies gain the advantage and ushered in the end of the war.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Della A. Yannuzzi
In the year 1914, most of Europe was divided into two sides. On one side were the Central Powers. Led by Germany, this faction also included the Austria-Hungary Empire and the Ottoman Empire. On the other side were the Allies, which included Great Britain, France, and Russia. On June 28, the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary and his wife were killed. This event touched off a war for world power which ultimately left millions dead. The United States government did not want to be involved in a European war, so remained neutral for as long as it could. Three years after it began, the United States entered into the war because German agents were urging Mexico to invade the U.S. On April 6, Congress declared war on Germany, officially entering World War I. The Hundred Days Offensive was a big push by the Allies—Great Britain, France, Russia, and the U.S.—to win the war. On August 8, 1918, the attack opened with the Battle of Amiens and then advanced to German-occupied towns. The Allies kept advancing until the Ottoman Empire surrendered on October 30, 1918. The surrender of Austria-Hungary came next. Germany now stood alone; it asked for an armistice. On November 11, 1918, the Hundred Days Offensive ended. Although the Offensive was successful, the damage left behind was devastating. Cities and farmlands were destroyed; many people had lost homes and loved ones. President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed November 11, 1919 to be the first commemoration of Armistice Day. In this book, Andrew Langley has written a clear and easily understood book of this important war. Mostly black and white photographs are included. Back material includes a timeline, a list of websites and books forfurther reading, a list of historic sites, a glossary, and chapter notes. Reviewer: Della A. Yannuzzi

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756538583
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Series:
Snapshots in History Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1000L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

Meet the Author

Andrew Langley is a prolific author of books for children, with a special interest in history and the environment. He has been short-listed for several major awards, most recently with books on natural disasters and Hiroshima.

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