The Ice Chorus

( 7 )

Overview

After an affair with a painter unravels her family and alters her life forever, filmmaker Liselle Dupre leaves Toronto for the lonely Irish coast to face her future, build a new life, and to heal. In a seaside village cast with beguiling characters, she's taken into the folds of the Conner family, whose humor and uncanny wisdom inspire Liselle to pick up her camera once again. Making a film of their loves and lives, she unearths conflicting accounts of the past and discovers not all histories are what they seem. ...
See more details below
Paperback (Revised)
$13.89
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$14.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $8.68   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

After an affair with a painter unravels her family and alters her life forever, filmmaker Liselle Dupre leaves Toronto for the lonely Irish coast to face her future, build a new life, and to heal. In a seaside village cast with beguiling characters, she's taken into the folds of the Conner family, whose humor and uncanny wisdom inspire Liselle to pick up her camera once again. Making a film of their loves and lives, she unearths conflicting accounts of the past and discovers not all histories are what they seem. In telling the stories of others, Liselle realizes it's time to finally reveal own - to recall those loves she has held dear and lost, and to imagine all she might regain.

The Ice Chorus is a novel about all we might discover when we face the truth about ourselves.

From Sarah Stonich, best-selling author of "These Granite Islands" and "Vacationland", comes "The Ice Chorus"

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Any woman who ever had her heart cracked open by a man should read The Ice Chorus, and the rest should too."  —Nuala O’Faolain, author, My Dream of You

"Stonich . . . pays homage to the Irish storytelling tradition in this sophisticated and fully realized tale of love and forgiveness . . . Midlife renewal and the power of art to transform life are celebrated in this bittersweet tale."  —Publishers Weekly

"Stonich effortlessly conjures multiple vivid settings and uncommonly interesting characters . . . A subtle, lovely evocation of the transforming power of love."  —Booklist

Publishers Weekly
Here's an Irish-style yarn: a woman of many nicknames meets an artist "considered ugly by most," has a paint-splattered affair with him and then finds comfort in exile at an unhandsome ocean house in Ireland. Stonich (These Granite Islands) pays homage to the Irish storytelling tradition in this sophisticated and fully realized tale of love and forgiveness. Lise is an amateur documentary filmmaker from Canada who loses herself in other people's stories. Having fled to Ireland after her affair ended her marriage and earned her the resentment of her 17-year-old son, Lise documents the stories of the inhabitants of the place where she lives, far from "postcard Ireland, just a small town at low tide." Here she waits for the artist, Charlie, to come to her and rekindle the love they discovered during their whirlwind affair on a trip to Mexico. Amid all this storytelling, Lise allows memories of her philandering father, who died young, to permeate her consciousness. The love story between Lise and Charlie, told in flashbacks, is rose-tinted, but provides a welcome respite from the stark realism of Lise's adjustment to rural Ireland. Midlife renewal and the power of art to transform life are celebrated in this bittersweet tale. Agent, Wendy Sherman. (Feb. 23) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In the aftermath of an extramarital affair with painter Charlie, Lise retreats to a seaside cottage in Ireland, where she reflects on her recent and distant history. Since we meet Charlie before we meet Lise's husband and son, our sympathies are not immediately engaged as we learn how the affair commenced; we don't know what's at stake. However, with the revelation of layers of memories, including a long-buried secret from Lise's childhood, we become more drawn into the tale. Between the flashbacks, a subplot about Lise's relations with the Conner family is equally engaging. Stonich (These Granite Islands) infuses her prose with sensory detail, appropriate for characters who are keen observers of their surroundings. The constantly shifting time line is occasionally confusing, but finally whether or not Lise and Charlie end up together is beside the point; this is a story about a woman achieving wholeness on her own terms. Recommended for public libraries.-Christine DeZelar-Tiedman, Univ. of Minnesota Libs., Minneapolis Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A bland, heart-tugging saga about a newly separated Canadian filmmaker who flees to Ireland to document the emotional lives of a small town's residents. A fifth of the way through this tidy, methodical tale that slips back and forth in time, the reader grows alarmed to discover there isn't going to be much more to the plot than this: mid-40s Liselle ("Lise") has left her husband, Stephen, and college-age son back in Toronto to clear her head after a torrid affair in Mexico with an artist, Charlie, that has altered the course of her life. Second-novelist Stonich (These Granite Islands, 2001), a capable but unstylish writer, lends no new twist to this familiar situation but, instead, gives over most of her space to the nostalgic stories Lise extracts from the inhabitants of the Irish village where she's rented a house. At Conner's hardware store, she meets the rheumy patriarch owner, Remy, his sassy granddaughter, Siobhan, who is dying to join her boyfriend in Boston, except that she lacks the money, and Remy's gorgeous wife, Margaret, who all, by fits and spurts, relate their personal stories on film. A few complications develop when Lise, during a drunken evening together, gives Siobhan the money to fly to Boston, and Margaret reveals some scandalous secrets about her own courtship with Remy. Meanwhile, the story of Lise's affair with Charlie unfolds-a sordid and sad tale no matter how sympathetic the reader feels for Lise's icy marriage. Charlie's shaggy attractiveness and passionate license to display his nudes of her in a gallery in her hometown only irritate but don't sway the reader, and a pat ending (leaving the character of husband Stephen utterly undeveloped) doesn't work. Stonichpiles on added emotional appeal in the form of Lise's childhood memories of her own philandering father. A story, banking on sentiment and stereotype, that can't convince. Agent: Wendy Sherman/Wendy Sherman & Associates
Candace Reed
"Stonich effortlessly conjures multiple vivid settings and uncommonly interesting characters even as she moves seamlessly between the past and present. A subtle, lovely evocation of the transforming power of love.
Nuala O'Faolain
Any woman who ever had her heart cracked open should read "The Ice Chorus"
Publisher's Weekly
Here's an Irish-style yarn: a woman of many nicknames meets an artist "considered ugly by most," has a paint-splattered affair with him and then finds comfort in exile at an unhandsome ocean house in Ireland. Stonich (These Granite Islands) pays homage to the Irish storytelling tradition in this sophisticated and fully realized tale of love and forgiveness. Lise is an amateur documentary filmmaker from Canada who loses herself in other people's stories. Having fled to Ireland after her affair en
Minneapolis Star Tribune
The Ice Chorus is one of those transporting novels that readers will inhabit as they're reading, and perhaps even replay the scenes that pack a particularly cinematic punch. In her unconventional second effort, Stonich has fully mastered the ability to build mood, creating a dreamy air of possibility that lingers."

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781846880827
  • Publisher: Alma Books
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Sarah's latest book, Vacationland connects a dozen characters to the same remote resort. She is the author of The Ice Chorus, and the award-winning, international best-seller These Granite Islands, translated into eight languages and reissued in a 12th anniversary edition by University of Minnesota Press. Her memoir Shelter won the NEMBA Award. She is currently writing and researching American River, a family saga set along the banks of the Mississippi and Hudson Rivers. Founder of the writers and editors consortium, WordStalkers, she lives in Minneapolis with her husband Jon and Aussie Shepherd, Betsy. For more, visit: sarahstonich.com
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 15, 2009

    One for the shelf

    The Ice Chorus is one of my favorite novels. Maybe it's the alternating backdrop of a scorching Mexican beach and the cool, stony cliffs of Ireland. Perhaps it's the tragic love story shot through a lens shrouded in misinterpretation and family secrets. More likely it's the tightly-woven plot and multi-layered characters. This is one I'll re-read every few years and tuck safely back on my shelf.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 25, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    Just a good curl up on the porch and read a good book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 20, 2009

    A beautiful love story

    The quote on the cover of The Ice Chorus by Sarah Stonich was the first thing that hooked me. "Any woman who ever had her heart cracked open by a man should read The Ice Chorus." Wow, right??

    The Ice Chorus is a story about Lise, a woman who is finding herself. She married young, and married the wrong man. While life with her husband hasn't been horrible - she has a wonderful son - it hasn't been happy or filled with love. While in Mexico, Lise meets another man - a man who changes everything.

    The story is set in Ireland, where Lise goes to find herself and reexamine her life. It tells the story of her marriage, her affair, and even parts of her childhood through flashbacks. This story is so vivid - you can smell the salt in the air, you can see the sunset off the beaches of Mexico. There are so many different kinds of relationships, mother and son, husband and wife, new love, friendship, and each one is believable. The characters are so strong and every one is important to the movement of the story.

    I don't think you need to have had your heart cracked open to read and appreciate this novel. I highly recommend this book to everyone who loves a good love story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Story About Love and Family

    "The Ice Chorus" is one of those books that will stay with you long after you've read the last page.

    Lise Dupre has left her home in Toronto, her soon-to-be-ex-husband, and her son to escape to a remote Irish village. A documentary film maker, she enjoys filming the lives and stories of others, yet she realizes that her own life is far from figured out. In Ireland she hopes to examine her past to ensure her future happiness. Complicating things is the fact that she met and fell in love with a Welsh painter while she was vacationing in Mexico, and that being with him may cost her her relationship with her teenage son.

    Sarah Stonich writes in a such a way as to make you believe that you are there with the characters, looking over their shoulders as they paint a wall or read a letter. As readers, we become so intricately involved in the lives of them that we feel that these people could be our neighbors, and that they could be our friends. They are all necessary to the plot, and flawed to the point that we can't help but see a little of ourselves in them. I loved Remy, the lovable grandfather and owner of the hardware store, as well as his wild granddaughter Siobhan. I adored Adam, Lise's son, and could only hope that he would eventually come to accept his mother for who she was.

    This was an enjoyable read, seamlessly switching from Ireland to Toronto to Mexico without missing a beat. It was a story about true love and about family, and how often we take these very things for granted.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Artistic and beautiful

    At it's most basic, The Ice Chorus is a story about a woman named Liselle who had an affair, and has travelled to Ireland to get away from her life. She's just gotten divorced from her husband, and her teenage son won't speak to her for more than a minute. The story unfolds moving from the present through flashbacks to show Liselle's life and how she met the man she loves, and how her relationship with her family changes, and how she ends up in the middle of nowhere on the Irish coast, asking other people how they fell in love, and documenting it all on film. That's a brief description of the plot. A very brief description, because The Ice Chorus is quite obviously more than just the plot.

    The cover of the book has a quote which says: "Any woman who ever had her heart cracked open by a man should read The Ice Chorus." But I completely disagree. I don't think having had your heart cracked is a requirement. I think every woman in general should read it (and men too). Yes it deals with love, and loss, and heartbreak; but it deals with more than just those emotions. It shows the fragility of women and the raw hurt of loss, but it also shows the immense strength all women possess, and the unexplainable bond of love.

    I can't rave enough about Sarah Stonich and her writing; it's just that amazing. The characters are real, and the emotions are heartbreaking and true. She captures these stories and people in a beautifully unique and impossibly artistic way.

    A million stars. Read it. And read her first book, These Granite Islands, too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Bridget's Review

    Liselle has met the man of her dreams. The problem is, she is married to someone else. When she sees Charlie, a fire ignites and the passion she feels is something her husband has never given her. Liselle realizes that life is short and true love is a wonderful emotion. The affair begins.

    Finally knowing what it feels like to really live, Liselle decides to document the lives of average, everyday people. Soon she finds out that in order to express the lives of others, she also needs to confess her own life story.

    One word: riveting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 14, 2009

    Love In MidLife!

    Posted 8/14/2009: In this story Lise is maybe 40-something, and might seem wise about many things, though not herself. Her journey to figure out her own life is a slow and lovely and often bittersweet train trip, and the writing underneath is smooth as oiled rails. From falling in love in Mexico to a life in Toronto and a marriage she thought was adequate if not perfect - until compared with her affair with a charming, wickedly intelligent and utterly un-handsome Charlie, a Welsh painter. Losing her son's affections in the aftermath of a very public 'outing' is the tipping point that sends Lise into exile - to the remote Irish coast. Much of the story is told from this vantage point - of the sea and the rickety cottage she tries to mend. Lise finds herself surrounded by a village of sage, odd, and charming Irish characters who, through their own stories, effectively lead Lise back to the core of her own life and her past, where she finally finds release in the truth. SF

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2006

    Simply Gorgeous

    Sarah Stonich's second novel reminds us why superb writing is usually understated and elogent. The story line is not necessarily new but you will learn new words and be touched by the main character, Lise, who regardless of strife or success is someone we can cheer for. I loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2005

    Ah, Ireland

    As a Minnesota author (Suomalaiset: People of the Marsh; Cloquet River Press, 2004; ISBN 0972005064) who enjoys quality literary fiction, I would recommend this latest offering from another Minnesota writer. The tale is tightly woven, psychologically filling, and well drawn. Lise, the protagonist, is someone that you'll want to walk the misty beaches of Ireland's Atlantic Coast with, share a spot of tea with, and ultimately, try to understand. Surrounded by a likeable and elegently crafted supporting cast, the book isn't one that will keep you up at nights pondering 'who done it'. But it will make you step back and take stock of what you have, who you are, and where you came from. A wonderfully taut and brisk read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)