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The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer - (Best Version) - (Bentley Loft Classics book #30)
     

The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer - (Best Version) - (Bentley Loft Classics book #30)

by Homer
 
Bentley Loft Classics if proud to present book #30; The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer.

The greatest adventure story of all time, this epic work chronicles Odysseus's return from the Trojan War and the best trials he endures on his best journey home. Filled with magic, mystery, and an assortment of gods & goddesses who meddle freely in the affairs of men.

Overview

Bentley Loft Classics if proud to present book #30; The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer.

The greatest adventure story of all time, this epic work chronicles Odysseus's return from the Trojan War and the best trials he endures on his best journey home. Filled with magic, mystery, and an assortment of gods & goddesses who meddle freely in the affairs of men. After ten long years of war Troy is finally destroyed and the besieging Greeks depart for home. Odysseus and his men set sail for Ithaca, but their best version of their journey is far from easy. Captured by Cyclops then detained by the nymph Calypso, it is only after a visit to the underworld and a miraculous escape from the witch Circe that Odysseus finally regains his island kingdom. But many years have passed since he was last there, and things are not as he left them.The Iliad (sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an epic poem in dactylic hexameters, traditionally attributed to Homer.

Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege, the earlier events, such as the gathering of warriors for the siege, the cause of the war and similar, tending to appear near the beginning, and the events prophesied for the future, such as Achilles' looming death and the sack of Troy, prefigured and alluded to more and more vividly approaching the end of the poem, making the poem tell a more or less complete tale of the Trojan War.

Along with the Odyssey, also attributed to Homer, the Iliad is among the oldest extant works of Western literature, and its written version is usually dated to around the eighth century BC.[1] The Iliad contains over 15,000 lines, and is written in Homeric Greek, a literary amalgam of Ionic Greek with other dialects.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013113572
Publisher:
Bentley Loft Publishing
Publication date:
06/21/2011
Series:
Bentley Loft Classics , #30
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

We know very little about the author of The Odyssey and its companion tale, The Iliad. Most scholars agree that Homer was Greek; those who try to identify his origin on the basis of dialect forms in the poems tend to choose as his bhomeland either Smyrna, now the Turkish city known as Izmir, or Chios, an island in the eastern Aegean Sea.

According to legend, Homer was blind, though scholarly evidence can neither confirm nor contradict the point.

The ongoing debate about who Homer was, when he lived, and even if he wrote The Odyssey and The Iliad is known as the "Homeric question." Classicists do agree that these tales of the fall of the city of Troy (Ilium) in the Trojan War (The Iliad) and the aftermath of that ten-year battle (The Odyssey) coincide with the ending of the Mycenaean period around 1200 BCE (a date that corresponds with the end of the Bronze Age throughout the Eastern Mediterranean). The Mycenaeans were a society of warriors and traders; beginning around 1600 BCE, they became a major power in the Mediterranean. Brilliant potters and architects, they also developed a system of writing known as Linear B, based on a syllabary, writing in which each symbol stands for a syllable.

Scholars disagree on when Homer lived or when he might have written The Odyssey. Some have placed Homer in the late-Mycenaean period, which means he would have written about the Trojan War as the best recent history. Close study of the texts, however, reveals aspects of political, material, religious, and military life of the Bronze Age and of the so-called Dark Age, as the period of domination by the less-advanced Dorian invaders who usurped the Mycenaeans is known. But how, other scholars argue, could Homer have created works of such magnitude in the Dark Age, when there was no system of writing? Herodotus, the ancient Greek historian, placed Homer sometime around the ninth century BCE, at the beginning of the Archaic period, in which the Greeks adopted a system of writing from the Phoenicians and widely colonized the Mediterranean. And modern scholarship shows that the most recent details in the poems are datable to the period between 750 and 700 BCE.

No one disputes the fact that The Odyssey (and The Iliad as well) arose from oral tradition. Stock phrases, types of episodes, and repeated phrases -- such as "early, rose-fingered dawn" -- bear the mark of epic storytelling.

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