The Importance of the Electoral College

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What do George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Jack Kennedy, Harry Truman, Woodrow Wilson, Abraham Lincoln, and eight other American Presidents have in common? Each received less than a majority of the votes cast in the election that elevated him into the White House. Nevertheless, the Presidency of the United States has enjoyed wide popularity and legitimacy. Why? Simply, the government of this greatest and freest nation the world has ever known has never aspired to, nor depended upon, ...
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Overview

What do George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Jack Kennedy, Harry Truman, Woodrow Wilson, Abraham Lincoln, and eight other American Presidents have in common? Each received less than a majority of the votes cast in the election that elevated him into the White House. Nevertheless, the Presidency of the United States has enjoyed wide popularity and legitimacy. Why? Simply, the government of this greatest and freest nation the world has ever known has never aspired to, nor depended upon, the forces of pure democracy.

Yet the question persists in the minds of many: How should Americans select their president? Were the Founding Fathers foolish elitists, or brilliant architects of a system designed to safeguard the American people from both tyranny by majority and tyranny by elites? With many Democrats and liberals disappointed over the results of the 2000 presidential election, the raging controversies over vote counting in Florida and the victory of President George W. Bush in 2000 has ignited a debate over the legitimacy of our constitutional process for selecting presidents. The question: Should we scrap the Electoral College in favor of the direct election of presidents?

In this timely primer on the electoral process, Dr. George Grant makes the case for the brilliance, wisdom, and continuing necessity of the Electoral College. This book is a must for students, lawyers, statesmen, pastors, and citizens of all ages interested in understanding and defending the providential system of elections bequeathed to us by our Founding Fathers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780975526422
  • Publisher: Vision Forum, Incorporated, The
  • Publication date: 9/1/2004
  • Pages: 267
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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  • Posted February 12, 2010

    should be an essential part of a student's study of American government

    Do you know what the Electoral College is? Many Americans have probably "heard" of it, but most of them probably couldn't tell you what it's all about. In order to secure the rights of all citizens and to provide stability for the government, our Founding Fathers established the Constitution upon the basic principle not of simple majority democracy but Federalism. The Electoral College as the way to choose the Chief Executive of the nation, along with other checks and balances, was part of their plan to achieve their goal. This book explains the genius behind their plan and the history of how it has worked so well in the two hundred plus years since.
    However, there have always been those who have called for the abolition of the Electoral College and demanded the direct election of the President by popular vote. This was especially the case after the 2000 election when Al Gore won a slight majority of the popular vote but lost the Electoral College vote. Remember how the "Bush-Cheney" ticket was charged with being "Bush-Cheats" by the "Gore-Lieberman" campaign who was in turn identified as "Sore-Loserman"? Those who did not like the outcome of that election argued that the "will of the people" was somehow thwarted by the Electoral College and, therefore, that it should be abolished. That's akin to "don't like the message, so kill the messenger." While admitting that some small changes might help the Electoral College operate more in line with the will of the people, the author argues for the brilliance, wisdom, and continuing necessity of the Electoral College.
    I first heard Dr. George Grant at a homeschooling conference in Ohio many years ago. The director of the King's Meadow Study Center and Professor of Humanities at Franklin Classical School, he is not only an electrifying speaker but also an unusually incisive thinker who can easily get to the heart of a matter, lay everything out simply, and provide the evidence that leads to the proper conclusion. Three appendices give relevant information about the Electoral College from The Federalist Papers, the U. S. Constitution, and U. S. Code Provisions. Part of "The Witherspoon Series," The Importance of the Electoral College should be an essential part of every homeschooled student's study of American government, and is a must for everyone else interested in understanding and defending the unique system of elections bequeathed to us by our Founding Fathers.

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