Impulse Story

Impulse Story

by Gato Barbieri
     
 

Gato Barbieri may be one of those saxophonists whose sound is so closely associated with smooth jazz -- and has been since the late '70s -- that it's hard to imagine he was once the progenitor of a singular kind of jazz fusion: and that's world fusion, not jazz-rock fusion. Barbieri recorded four albums for Impulse! between 1973 and 1975 that should have changed jazz… See more details below

Overview

Gato Barbieri may be one of those saxophonists whose sound is so closely associated with smooth jazz -- and has been since the late '70s -- that it's hard to imagine he was once the progenitor of a singular kind of jazz fusion: and that's world fusion, not jazz-rock fusion. Barbieri recorded four albums for Impulse! between 1973 and 1975 that should have changed jazz forever, in that he provided an entirely new direction when it was desperately needed. That it didn't catch certainly isn't his fault, but spoke more to the dearth of new ideas that followed after the discoveries of John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, and Miles Davis. Barbieri, a Coltrane disciple, hailed from Argentina and sought to bring the music of Latin America, most specifically its folk forms, into the jazz arena. He was wildly successful aesthetically and critically if not commercially -- though the first album, Chapter One: Latin America, sold well enough (it is currently available as half of a two-disc set called Latino America [IMPD 236-2], which includes Chapter Two: Hasta Siempre, restores all cuts to their original lengths, and adds bonus material). But there's more to it than his adding folk musicians -- not studio pros -- to the mix. Barbieri's volume of The Impulse Story is one of a ten-disc series by individual artists that fleshes out the four-CD box called The House That Trane Built, supporting Ashley Kahn's book of the same name -- the author chose all the selections on these volumes and wrote biographical notes to each package. Barbieri appears here with small and large folk groups -- which include fellow Argentine bandoneonist Dino Saluzzi to name just one -- recorded in both Rio and Los Angeles. The disc's first five cuts come from Chapter One and Chapter Two, and the complete versions of both "Nunca Mas" and "Econtros," as well as the stomping "Gato Gato," come from those sessions. The next phase of the Impulse!/Gato saga took place in 1974 on Chapter Three: Viva Emiliano Zapata -- which remains out of print -- and the next three cuts, "Cuando Vuelva a Tu Lado (What a Difference a Day Makes)," the title tune, and Barbieri's own "El Sublime," are included. These tracks feature the saxophonist fronting Cuban bandleader and arranger Chico O'Farrill's big band, and were recorded in New York. Barbieri's amazing jazz tango "Milonga Triste" comes from Chapter Four: Alive in New York. The set turns in on itself by going back to Chapter One in the brief and beautiful cut called "To Be Continued." This is a fine introduction to Gato Barbieri for those who are interested in what he sounded like before he became a star and began playing more middle-of-the-road material -- much if which is excellent as well. Barbieri is worthy of serious rediscovery by a new generation, and this tight little set goes a long way toward making that case.

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Product Details

Release Date:
06/06/2006
Label:
Impulse Records
UPC:
0602498551042
catalogNumber:
000656102
Rank:
16749

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Gato Barbieri   Primary Artist,Tenor Saxophone
Dino Saluzzi   Bandoneon
Ray Mantilla   Percussion
Buddy Morrow   Trombone
Seldon Powell   Flute,Alto Saxophone,Baritone Saxophone
Grady Tate   Drums
Ray Alonge   French Horn
Ray Armando   Percussion,Conga
Randy Brecker   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
James Buffington   French Horn
Helio Delmiro   Electric Guitar
Jim Hughart   Electric Bass
Eddie Martinez   Piano,Electric Piano
Bob McCoy   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Paul Metzke   Electric Guitar
Novelli   Electric Bass
Chico O'Farrill   Conductor
Victor Paz   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
John Pisano   Acoustic Guitar
Portinho   Percussion
Alan Raph   Bass Trombone
Lee Ritenour   Electric Guitar
Alan Rubin   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Bob Zimitti   Drums
Mayuto Correa   Percussion,Conga,Triangle
Antonio Pantoja   Percussion,Quena,erkencho,Sikus
Adalberto Cevasco   Electric Bass
Domingo Cura   Bombo
Ricardo Lew   Electric Guitar
Raul Mercado   Quena
Amadeo Monges   Arpa India
Quelo Palacios   Acoustic Guitar
Luis Mangual   Percussion
Howard Glover "Johnny" Johnson   Tuba,Bass Clarinet,Flugelhorn,Baritone Saxophone

Technical Credits

Gato Barbieri   Composer
Chico O'Farrill   Arranger
Bob Irwin   Mastering
Ashley Kahn   Liner Notes
Jayme Pieruzzi   Mastering

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