The Indian Removal Act: Forced Relocation

The Indian Removal Act: Forced Relocation

by Mark Stewart, Paul Stewart
     
 

When the United States won its freedom from Great Britain, colonies became states, subjects became citizens, and the nation’s leaders faced a complex question: How did the native people of the United States fit into this new picture? Government leaders concluded that they did not. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 sparked intense moral and political debate,

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Overview

When the United States won its freedom from Great Britain, colonies became states, subjects became citizens, and the nation’s leaders faced a complex question: How did the native people of the United States fit into this new picture? Government leaders concluded that they did not. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 sparked intense moral and political debate, led to the near-destruction of five powerful Southeastern tribes, and exposed the widening gap between the young country’s ideals and its actions.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathryn Erskine
Part of the "Snapshots in History" series, this powerful look at how the bulk of America's southwestern tribes were forcibly marched to less desirable land is an important read not only for the historical event itself but also for an examination of how our country implements its ideals. Stewart explains the background leading up to the radical decision to take native lands, including the insidious civilization plan which entailed getting tribes to turn to farming to reduce their claim on lands outside of their farms, and lavishly extending them credit only to pull their land away as payment of their debt. While some native people played into the hands of the government by attacking homesteaders, the majority, many of them very well educated, tried to find a middle road, including using the political and judicial system to ensure their rights. Unfortunately, the government was determined to clear the land, overriding significant opposition. Due to poor planning, lack of basic provisions, bad weather, and disease, at least 5,000 native people who were put in holding camps and then forced to march over 1,000 kilometers westward died. Bodies were hastily left under piles of stones, horrifying even accompanying soldiers on the so called Trail of Tears. This book is an excellent reminder, as Stewart notes, that we are still learning the lesson that discriminating against one race is ultimately damaging to both. A glossary, index and timeline are included.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756524524
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Series:
Snapshots in History Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1120L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

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