The Injustice System: A Murder in Miami and a Trial Gone Wrong

( 1 )

Overview

A man accused of a murder he didn't commit languishes on death row. A crusading lawyer is determined to free him. This powerful book reads like a compelling legal thriller with one crucial difference: Justice is not served in the end.

In 1986, Kris Maharaj was arrested in Miami for the murder of his ex-business partner. A witness swore he saw him pull the trigger and a jury found him guilty and sentenced him to death. But he swears he didn't do it. Twenty years later, he's ...

See more details below
Audiobook (CD - Library - Unabridged CD)
$75.59
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$83.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (5) from $48.25   
  • New (2) from $60.91   
  • Used (3) from $48.25   
The Injustice System: A Murder in Miami and a Trial Gone Wrong

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

A man accused of a murder he didn't commit languishes on death row. A crusading lawyer is determined to free him. This powerful book reads like a compelling legal thriller with one crucial difference: Justice is not served in the end.

In 1986, Kris Maharaj was arrested in Miami for the murder of his ex-business partner. A witness swore he saw him pull the trigger and a jury found him guilty and sentenced him to death. But he swears he didn't do it. Twenty years later, he's bankrupted himself on appeals and been abandoned by everyone but his wife.

Enter Clive Stafford Smith, a charismatic public defender with a passion for lost causes who calls up old files and embarks on his own investigation. It takes him from Miami to Nassau to Washington as he uncovers corruption at every turn. Step by step, Clive slowly dismantles the case, guiding us through the whole scaffolding of the legal process and revealing a fundamentally broken system whose goal is not so much to find the right man as to convict.

A bombshell whose final chapter should re-open a long closed case, The Injustice System will appeal to fans of true crime and anyone who has served on a jury.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Abbe Smith
…Smith paints a bleak picture of criminal justice in America…There are dishonest cops, smug prosecutors, a feckless defense lawyer (now a judge) and venal witnesses…The Injustice System is…a moving tale of devotion by an extraordinary lawyer who nearly bankrupts himself and his fledgling public-interest law office to fight for his client's life and liberty. Smith is at his best when he shares small stories—his first visit with Maharaj; his talks with Maharaj's wife…and his own feelings of despair.
The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
This is the kind of puzzle plot Bannister is known for; Gabriel is the kind of character who takes satisfying shape before your eyes; and Hazel's is the kind of classic detective work that's always welcome in a mad, mad world.
Publishers Weekly
Smith, a longtime defense attorney specializing in capital crimes in Louisiana, focuses on the case of Krishna Maharaj, a successful businessman convicted of the 1986 Miami murder of his former partner, Derrick Moo Young, and Moo Young's son. As Smith, who handled Maharaj's appeals, digs through Maharaj's case, he uncovers a shocking web of prosecutorial misconduct, apparent defense incompetence, judicial corruption, and the possible involvement of Colombian drug cartels. Despite uncovering all of these things, Smith was still unable to get the legal system to give Maharaj a fair retrial, and while his sentence has been reduced to life imprisonment, he is still in jail for a crime insists he did not commit, a claim supported by several alibi witnesses. By focusing on and exhaustively researching the Maharaj case, Smith (The Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side) exposes flaws in the legal system as a whole, and forces readers to confront unpleasant truths and their preconceived notions of criminals, justice, and jurisprudence.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
From the Publisher
"Clive Stafford Smith details a spectacular example of a bogus conviction, and the many lives ruined by it. It is a superbly written account of only one case, but one of thousands." —-John Grisham
Library Journal
Smith (Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side: Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay), a veteran defender of criminal cases, first became involved with Krishna Maharaj in 1994 as the Trinidadian man faced execution for the murders of two Jamaican businessmen in Miami. The book is organized around Maharaj's more than 25 years in the criminal justice system and the actors involved. Smith combines details of this conviction with related cases and policy issues. Using forensic accounting techniques and historical insights into the drug wars of that era, he argues that the defendant was falsely convicted. Significant but fairly technical issues about the appeals process through the Supreme Court level are raised along with a thoughtful discussion of victims' rights in the United State. VERDICT Although the narrative may be too policy-oriented for casual readers of true crime, its scope and human-interest angle will engage concerned citizens and students of the criminal justice system. This is a well-written, detailed, and intriguing case study of justice denied from a crusading insider's perspective.—Antoinette Brinkman, formerly of the Southwest Indiana Mental Health Ctr. Lib., Evansville
Kirkus Reviews
Stinging account of a questionable 1986 death penalty case by the lawyer who tried to get it overturned. By the time Smith (Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side: Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay, 2007, etc.) became involved in the case of Kris Maharaj, the once-wealthy Trinidadian businessman of Indian heritage had been convicted and sentenced to death in Miami for the murder of a former business partner and his son. Smith received a request to examine the conviction from British diplomatic officials. Despite an already overwhelming workload at his New Orleans public-interest law firm (which seeks justice for indigent defendants victimized by unfair trials) and the lack of a budget to pay him, Smith said he would investigate. He sensed quickly from reading the trial transcript that Maharaj had been railroaded. While gathering evidence, Smith pieced together a grim scenario of a conviction based on the machinations of a crooked homicide detective, cheating prosecutors, biased forensic experts, a dishonest judge and appellate justices determined to uphold it no matter how strongly new information suggested Maharaj's innocence. Worst of all, the author determined that the defendant's original trial lawyer had been grossly incompetent and may have intentionally lost the case because of threats made against his family. As the chronicle ends, Smith sees no realistic hope for exoneration, even though he can present an alternative solution that involves South American drug dealers (who had nothing to do with Maharaj) and includes the identities of the actual murderers. In the author's view, the case is a glaring, but by no means unique, example of massive flaws in the American criminal justice system. A wrongful-conviction saga different from most others because there is no justice at the end.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781452640013
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/8/2012
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Library - Unabridged CD
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 6.50 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Clive Stafford Smith is a criminal defense lawyer and founder of Reprieve, an organization that provides legal support to low-income prisoners accused of the most extreme crimes. He lives in London.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface ix

1 The Trial 1

2 The Sentence 25

3 The Defendant 40

4 The Witness 53

5 The Prosecutor 76

6 The Police 100

7 The Expert 118

8 The Defense Lawyer 138

9 The Other Suspects 159

10 The Money Trail 178

11 The Colombian Connection 193

12 The Judge 202

13 The Jury 218

14 The Road to Nowhere 237

15 The Federal Appeal 257

16 The Victims 276

17 The Battle Continues 289

Epilogue 303

Acknowledgments 315

Notes 319

Index 345

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    This is one of the best nonfiction books I've read. It opens you

    This is one of the best nonfiction books I've read. It opens your eyes to how messed up our justice system remains towards those on death row.I highly recommend reading this

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)