The Innocent Ambassadors

The Innocent Ambassadors

4.0 1
by Philip Wylie
     
 
What begins as a flight to Hawaii in 1956 to see their first grandchild expands to nearly a three-month trip around the world for Wylie and his wife. Among the places they visit are China, Japan, India, Turkey and the Middle East.

Wylie described the trip as "astounding--a journey that informed and appalled me, even in the areas where I thought myself both better

Overview

What begins as a flight to Hawaii in 1956 to see their first grandchild expands to nearly a three-month trip around the world for Wylie and his wife. Among the places they visit are China, Japan, India, Turkey and the Middle East.

Wylie described the trip as "astounding--a journey that informed and appalled me, even in the areas where I thought myself both better informed and more appalled than most of my fellow Americans."

"An intellectually stimulating tour with one of the most persuasive traveling companions you could hope to find." (San Francisco Chronicle)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780837181363
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/23/1975
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.88(d)

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The Innocent Ambassadors 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is more than a travel book it is a rail against the reach of communism at the time. It is best when it is a travel book, explaining first person the many wonderful people, sights and structures seen through the eyes of an obviously intelligent man. The passages that are most insightful are those discussing human nature. That, I have come to find in my internet searching, is what he is best known for. The politics are the page length descriptions I flipped past. Too boring. Some of the politic parts are interesting, however, to show how little some situations have changed in almost 50 years - israel/palestine and especially india/pakistan. The one thing that truly bugged me was his alleged total recall of intricate conversations. Nowhere does he say he had a redorder and he could not possibly have taken notes of his own long monologues. Still - a good read that has great monents of description and the occassional push toward epithany for the reader