The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World's Most Important Company

The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World's Most Important Company

by Michael S. Malone
     
 

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Based on unprecedented access to the corporation’s archives, The Intel Trinity is the first full history of Intel Corporation—the essential company of the digital age— told through the lives of the three most important figures in the company’s history: Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove.

Often hailed the “most important

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Overview

Based on unprecedented access to the corporation’s archives, The Intel Trinity is the first full history of Intel Corporation—the essential company of the digital age— told through the lives of the three most important figures in the company’s history: Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove.

Often hailed the “most important company in the world,” Intel remains, more than four decades after its inception, a defining company of the global digital economy. The legendary inventors of the microprocessor-the single most important product in the modern world-Intel today builds the tiny “engines” that power almost every intelligent electronic device on the planet.

But the true story of Intel is the human story of the trio of geniuses behind it. Michael S. Malone reveals how each brought different things to Intel, and at different times. Noyce, the most respected high tech figure of his generation, brought credibility (and money) to the company’s founding; Moore made Intel the world’s technological leader; and Grove, has relentlessly driven the company to ever-higher levels of success and competitiveness. Without any one of these figures, Intel would never have achieved its historic success; with them, Intel made possible the personal computer, Internet, telecommunications, and the personal electronics revolutions.

The Intel Trinity is not just the story of Intel’s legendary past; it also offers an analysis of the formidable challenges that lie ahead as the company struggles to maintain its dominance, its culture, and its legacy.

With eight pages of black-and-white photos.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
08/01/2014
Journalist Malone (The Future Arrived Yesterday) presents a comprehensive history of Intel Corporation. He chronicles the business from its inception as a start-up in the late 1960s and early 1970s to its work with memory chips and continued success as the technological innovator that created the microprocessor—which forever changed the history of computers. Malone describes the founding and success of Intel by tracing the lives of its three founders. One of them, Andy Grove, is a chemical engineer and an instinctively shrewd businessman. Another was physicist Robert Noyce (1927–90), who provided the science for the development of the microchip. The trio was rounded out by Gordon Moore, who developed Moore's law, which observed the exponential growth of transistors on a chip. One of the accomplishments Malone credits to Intel is its reputation as the most innovative semiconductor company in electronics. VERDICT Owing to its excellent original research, Tom Jackson's Inside Intel is a better, more comprehensive work on the company, but this book should be of interest to both general readers and specialists.—Claude Ury, San Francisco

Publishers Weekly
03/24/2014
The manufacturer of the micro-processors that power Windows computers and other electronic gadgetry acquires quasi-divine status in this awestruck corporate history. Journalist Malone (The Future Arrived Yesterday) peppers countless superlatives—even the “Intel Inside” ad blitz constituted “a historic achievement”—throughout his engaging, but disorganized, over-padded, yet sometimes cursory account of the company’s technological breakthroughs and business-strategy coups. The book succeeds in its portrayal of the hair-raising travails of longtime CEO Andy Grove (“the greatest businessman of the age”), who grew up Jewish in Nazi-occupied Hungary and then fled communism. Meanwhile, a lavish chronicle of Robert Noyce’s uneventful middle-American backstory is a less-than-gripping part of the author’s attempt to resurrect the Intel co-founder as a Silicon Valley titan. This is a serviceable account of the digital revolution’s hardware side, but Malone inflates Intel into the semi-conductor equivalent of the triune godhead, styling Noyce as “the beloved and charismatic father,” Grove as “the brilliant but truculent son in a perpetual Oedipal battle,” and co-founder Gordon Moore as the “Holy Spirit of the digital age,” his celebrated Moore’s Law—integrated circuits double their performance every year or two—propelling mankind towards the “singularity” when humans and computers become one. Less bombast and myth-making might have yielded a more substantive saga. 8-page b&w photo insert. Agent: Jim Levine, Levine Greenberg. (July)
-Walter Isaacson
“Mike Malone’s book on Bob Noyce, Gordon Moore and Andy Grove - Silicon Valley’s Mount Rushmore - belongs with Walter Isaacson’s treatment of Steve Jobs, Neal Gabler’s opus on Walt Disney, and Tom Wolfe’s look at the first astronauts. Trinity is that big and that good.”
Reid Hoffman
“Few people capture the rhythms and values that fuel Silicon Valley as well as longtime journalist Michael S. Malone. In his latest book, he takes on the history of Intel, a company he started covering when most reporters were still using typewriters. He reveals his deep knowledge on every page.”
-Rich Karlgaard
“Mike Malone’s book on Bob Noyce, Gordon Moore and Andy Grove - Silicon Valley’s Mount Rushmore - belongs with Walter Isaacson’s treatment of Steve Jobs, Neal Gabler’s opus on Walt Disney, and Tom Wolfe’s look at the first astronauts. Trinity is that big and that good.”
Walter Isaacson
“Michael Malone, one of the most interesting chroniclers of Silicon Valley, has produced a fascinating history of Intel. It’s a valuable study of innovation, great leadership, and colorful personalities. Anyone who wants to know how creativity leads to invention should read this wonderful book.”
Rich Karlgaard
“Mike Malone’s book on Bob Noyce, Gordon Moore and Andy Grove - Silicon Valley’s Mount Rushmore - belongs with Walter Isaacson’s treatment of Steve Jobs, Neal Gabler’s opus on Walt Disney, and Tom Wolfe’s look at the first astronauts. Trinity is that big and that good.”
Booklist
Malone moves past the standard Intel mythology to uncover many aspects of the company’s ascendance that have been glossed over or lost to history. Malone gives long-overdue credit to the unsung heroes and inventors for their contributions.
The Wall Street Journal
“What’s been missing is an authoritative work that blends all the key people and the technology with a thorough, up-to-date business history. “The Intel Trinity” fills that gap.”
Washington Post
“What he has produced is popular history, the tale of an epoch-defining industrial romp and the three men who led it.”
Salon
“”The Intel Trinity” is a fine introduction to the founding myths legends of Silicon Valley.”
Wall Street Journal
“This is business history at its best.”
—Entrepreneur's 25 Amazing Business Books from 2014
“Through extensive and unprecedented access to Intel’s archives, Malone describes how each of these vital members of Intel brought various skills and talents to the company to make it the giant it is today.”
--Entrepreneur's 25 Amazing Business Books from 2014
“Through extensive and unprecedented access to Intel’s archives, Malone describes how each of these vital members of Intel brought various skills and talents to the company to make it the giant it is today.”
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-06-05
Richly detailed, swiftly moving work of modern business history, recounting a truly world-changing technology and the people who made it possible.It began with an invention, then a revolt. The invention owes to three physicists, who, just after World War II, developed a replacement for the vacuum tube. “Neolithic-looking in its first incarnation,” the semiconductor had countless uses, and it immediately made fortunes for all concerned—except for those three physicists. Writes longtime Silicon Valley watcher Malone (The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory, 2012, etc.), one of them, William Shockley, resenting that fact, set up his own manufacturing firm. The trouble was, no one who had ever encountered him wanted to work with him, forcing him to recruit far outside the usual Caltech/Bell Labs fold. That introduction of new blood was certainly good. It was also bad, however, since Shockley—later to become infamous for his inflammatory pronouncements on race—really and truly was detestable. This all set the innovative trio of Noyce, Moore and Grove on the way to establishing Intel. Noyce got things going as founding CEO of Fairchild Semiconductor; his confidence, Malone writes, “would play a key role in making Fairchild, and later Intel, look far bigger than it really was.” It didn’t hurt to have Moore, the far-seeing technologist and coiner of Moore’s law—which Malone invokes like a mantra perhaps one too many times—and Grove, another shrewd master of the market, along for the ride. Malone has his technological history down cold, though sometimes it can be a little daunting, as when he discusses the fraught business of developing the silicon gate, bootstrapping “each gate atop its partner transistor, something heretofore considered impossible.” Fortunately, the author discusses that complex technology within the context of commerce, broadening its appeal to the business audience as well.Essential for aspiring entrepreneurs, to say nothing of those looking for a view of how the modern, speed-of-light world came to be.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062226785
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/15/2014
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
560
Sales rank:
363,112
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Michael S. Malone is one of the world's best-known technology writers. A veteran newspaper reporter and columnist, magazine editor, and entrepreneur, he is the author or coauthor of nearly twenty award-winning books, notably the bestselling The Virtual Corporation, Bill & Dave, and The Intel Trinity.

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