The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

by Joel Paris
     
 

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The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5® explores all revisions to the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual, and shows clinicians how they can best apply the strong points and shortcomings of psychiatry's most contentious resource. Written by a celebrated professor of psychiatry, this reader-friendly book uses evidence-based critiques

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Overview

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5® explores all revisions to the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual, and shows clinicians how they can best apply the strong points and shortcomings of psychiatry's most contentious resource. Written by a celebrated professor of psychiatry, this reader-friendly book uses evidence-based critiques and new research to point out where DSM-5 is right, where it is wrong, and where the jury's still out. Along the way, The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5® sifts through the many public controversies and clinical debates surrounding the drafting of the manual and shows how they inform a modern understanding of psychiatric illness, diagnosis and treatment. This book is necessary reading for all mental health professionals as they grapple with the first major revision of the DSM to appear in over 30 years.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[T]his is an excellent critique of the DSM-5 that astutely assesses the shortcomings as well as improvements of this latest DSM." —Doody's

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Brett C. Plyler, M.D.(Northwestern Memorial Hospital)
Description: This is a critique and guide to the just-released DSM-5.
Purpose: The purpose is to address the most important changes from DSM-IV to DSM-5, discuss the implications of these changes for clinical practice, and to consider whether DSM-5 is better, worse, or equal to its predecessors.
Audience: The audience includes anyone who will use the DSM-5 clinically or otherwise.
Features: The book begins with a thorough introduction to the problems surrounding psychiatric diagnoses in general and, more specifically, the issues with DSM-5. The next three sections cover diagnostic principles, specific diagnoses, and an overview. The diagnostic principles portion deals with the broader issues of how manuals are created, dimensionality of diagnoses, validity of diagnoses, and the problems of symptom-guided classifications of mental illness. The second section addresses the individual changes in DSM-5 for all of the diagnoses, highlighting the changes with the greatest impact and the implications of each. Most of the discussion is focused on the more frequently used diagnoses — mood disorders, psychotic illnesses, and anxiety. The last part of the book details the author's criticisms of the DSM-5. He takes issue with the overexpansion of mental illness and fears it will cause greater harm than good. The author also expresses his concern with the continued focus on psychiatry as neuroscience only. His advice for the DSM-5 (which is the same as for DSM-IV) is to "learn it but don't believe it." The book closes out with some of his final thoughts and a look ahead to DSM-6.
Assessment: This is an excellent critique of DSM-5 and psychiatry in general. Written in an engaging style, the book draws readers in. Although it is less than 200 pages, it covers the complex changes in DSM-5 thoroughly and objectively. In particular, it focuses on the DSM-5's conflation of normality and psychopathology and the reductionist view of psychiatry solely as neuroscience. The author challenges the DSM-5's use of categorical and dimensional organization without clinical input. He details why senior experts from DSM-III and DSM-IV were left out of the planning process for DSM-5 and what the editors of the DSM-5 were trying to achieve. All of this serves readers well in understanding the purpose of DSM-5 and being able to make an informed opinion about it. I highly recommend this book for anyone who will be using the DSM-5.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199395095
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
03/16/2015
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
753,917
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Joel Paris, MD, was born in New York City, but has spent most of his life in Canada. He obtained an MD from McGill University in 1964, where he also trained in psychiatry. Dr. Paris has been a member of the McGill psychiatry department since 1972 and served as Department Chair from 1997 to 2007. He has published 178 peer-reviewed articles, 14 books and 40 book chapters. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.

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