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The Internet of Things: Connecting Objects [NOOK Book]

Overview

Internet of Things: Connecting Objects… puts forward the technologies and the networking architectures which make it possible to support the Internet of Things. Amongst these technologies, RFID, sensor and PLC technologies are described and a clear view on how they enable the Internet of Things is given. This book also provides a good overview of the main issues facing the Internet of Things such as the issues of privacy and security, application and usage, and standardization. ...
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The Internet of Things: Connecting Objects

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Overview

Internet of Things: Connecting Objects… puts forward the technologies and the networking architectures which make it possible to support the Internet of Things. Amongst these technologies, RFID, sensor and PLC technologies are described and a clear view on how they enable the Internet of Things is given. This book also provides a good overview of the main issues facing the Internet of Things such as the issues of privacy and security, application and usage, and standardization.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118600177
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 2/4/2013
  • Series: ISTE
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • File size: 4 MB

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Chapter 1. Introduction to the Internet of Things 1
Hakima CHAOUCHI

1.1. Introduction 1

1.2. History of IoT 3

1.3. About objects/things in the IoT 7

1.4. The identifier in the IoT 9

1.5. Enabling technologies of IoT 13

1.6. About the Internet in IoT 21

1.7. Bibliography 32

Chapter 2. Radio Frequency Identification Technology Overview 35
Ayyangar Ranganath HARISH

2.1. Introduction 35

2.2. Principle of RFID 36

2.3. Components of an RFID system 41

2.4. Issues 48

2.5. Bibliography 52

Chapter 3. Wireless Sensor Networks: Technology Overview 53
Thomas WATTEYNE and Kristofer S.J. PISTER

3.1. History and context 53

3.2. The node 60

3.3. Connecting nodes 64

3.4. Networking nodes 70

3.5. Securing communication 88

3.6. Standards and Fora 89

3.7. Conclusion 91

3.8. Bibliography 91

Chapter 4. Power Line Communication Technology Overview 97
Xavier CARCELLE and Thomas BOURGEAU

4.1. Introduction 97

4.2. Overview of existing PLC technologies and standards 98

4.3. Architectures for home network applications 114

4.4. Internet of things using PLC technology 120

4.5. Conclusion 127

4.6. Bibliography 127

Chapter 5. RFID Applications and Related Research Issues 129
Oscar BOTERO and Hakima CHAOUCHI

5.1. Introduction 129

5.2. Concepts and terminology 129

5.3. RFID applications 139

5.4. Ongoing research projects 144

5.5. Summary and conclusions 152

5.6. Bibliography 153

Chapter 6. RFID Deployment for Location and Mobility Management on the Internet 157
Apostolia PAPAPOSTOLOU and Hakima CHAOUCHI

6.1. Introduction 157

6.2. Background and related work 159

6.3. Localization and handover management relying on RFID 169

6.4. Technology considerations 176

6.5. Performance evaluation 181

6.6. Summary and conclusions 187

6.7. Bibliography 188

Chapter 7. The Internet of Things – Setting the Standards 191
Keith MAINWARING and Lara SRIVASTAVA

7.1. Introduction 191

7.2. Standardizing the IoT 193

7.3. Exploiting the potential of RFID 196

7.4. Identification in the IoT 202

7.5. Promoting ubiquitous networking: any where, any when, any what 212

7.6. Safeguarding data and consumer privacy 217

7.7. Conclusions 220

7.8. Bibliography 220

Chapter 8. Governance of the Internet of Things 223
Rolf H. WEBER

8.1. Introduction 223

8.2. Bodies subject to governing principles 225

8.3. Substantive principles for IoT governance 233

8.4. IoT infrastructure governance 239

8.5. Further governance issues 246

8.6. Outlook 248

8.7. Bibliography 248

Conclusion 251

List of Authors 261

Index 263

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    RFID, PLC and WSN

    The book describes 3 topics - RFID, power line communications [PLC] and wireless sensor networks [WSNs]. Low level engineering details are largely omitted. But there is enough technical material to perhaps require a background of 1 or 2 years of undergraduate study in engineering or science. It's a good read, without being bogged down in myriad equations.

    Of the topics, RFID and PLC are the most advanced in terms of actual mass deployment. When it comes to actual possible connections to the Internet, RFID is really not apropos. The contexts in which RFID has been deployed [and which are expected to be in the near future] are for companies that might want more inventory control. While in principle such data might then be made available on the Internet, it seems in practice that access will be restricted to within the company.

    PLC is certainly expected to include Internet access. Power companies are acutely interested in this. First for cheaper and easier remote monitoring of electricity usage. Second for selling Internet access to their customers, and this last mile access is very expensive for competing implementations.

    The WSN is the furthest from any large commercial usage. Mostly, it has been done in various research contexts. And as far as Internet access is concerned, this might be from the Internet to a base station that controls a WSN. But it does not extend to actually communicating with a sensor node inside that network, due to the limited power and bandwidth of such nodes.

    If you are interested in learning more about WSN, the publisher offers an entire recent text devoted to extensive discourse, Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks: Algorithms and Protocols for Scalable Coordination and Data Communication

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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