The Internet of Things: Connecting Objects / Edition 1

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Overview

Internet of Things: Connecting Objects… puts forward the technologies and the networking architectures which make it possible to support the Internet of Things. Amongst these technologies, RFID, sensor and PLC technologies are described and a clear view on how they enable the Internet of Things is given. This book also provides a good overview of the main issues facing the Internet of Things such as the issues of privacy and security, application and usage, and standardization.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848211407
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 5/24/2010
  • Series: ISTE Series , #420
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1 Introduction to the Internet of Things 1

1.1 Introduction Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 1

1.2 History of IoT Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 3

1.3 About objects/things in the IoT Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 7

1.4 The identifier in the IoT Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 9

1.5 Enabling technologies of IoT Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 13

1.5.1 Identification technology Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 15

1.5.2 Sensing and actuating technology Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 17

1.5.3 Other technologies Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 18

1.5.4 Connected objects' communication Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 19

1.6 About the Internet in IoT Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 21

1.7 Bibliography Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 32

Chapter 2 Radio Frequency Identification Technology Overview Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 35

2.1 Introduction Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 35

2.2 Principle of RFID Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 36

2.3 Components of an RFID system Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 41

2.3.1 Reader Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 41

2.3.2 RFD) tag Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 44

2.3.3 RFID middleware Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 45

2.4 Issues Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 48

2.5 Bibliography Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 52

Chapter 3 Wireless Sensor Networks: Technology Overview Ayyangar Ranganath Harsh Harsh, Ayyangar Ranganath 53

3.1 History and context Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 53

3.1.1 From smart dust to smart plants Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 54

3.1.2 Application requirements in modem WSNs Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 55

3.2 The node Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 60

3.2.1 Communication Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 60

3.2.2 Computation Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 63

3.2.3 Sensing Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 63

3.2.4 Energy Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 64

3.3 Connecting nodes Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 64

3.3.1 Radio basics Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 64

3.3.2 Common misconceptions Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 66

3.3.3 Reliable communication in practice: channel hopping Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 67

3.4 Networking nodes Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 70

3.4.1 Medium access control Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 71

3.4.2 Multi-hop routing Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 80

3.5 Securing communication Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 88

3.6 Standards and Fora Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 89

3.7 Conclusion Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 91

3.8 Bibliography Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 91

Chapter 4 Power Line Communication Technology Overview Kristofer S.J. Pister Pister, Kristofer S. J. 97

4.1 Introduction Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 97

4.2 Overview of existing PLC technologies and standards Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 98

4.2.1 History of PLC technologies Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 99

4.2.2 Different types of in-home PLC technologies Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 100

4.2.3 Security Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 109

4.2.4 Performances of PLC technologies Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 110

4.2.5 Standards and normalization Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 112

4.3 Architectures for home network applications Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 114

4.3.1 Architecture for a high bit-rate home network application Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 115

4.3.2 Architecture for low bit-rate home network application Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 117

4.4 Internet of things using PLC technology Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 120

4.4.1 Connecting objects in the indoor environment Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 121

4.4.2 Interoperability of connecting objects in the home environment Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 124

4.5 Conclusion Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 127

4.6 Bibliography Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 127

Chapter 5 RFID Applications and Related Research Issues Thomas Bourgeau Bourgeau, Thomas 129

5.1 Introduction Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 129

5.2 Concepts and terminology Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 129

5.2.1 Radio-frequency identification Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 130

5.2.2 Transponder (tag) classes Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 132

5.2.3 Standards Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 134

5.2.4 RFID system architecture Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 136

5.2.5 Other related technologies Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 138

5.3 RFID applications Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 139

5.3.1 Logistics and supply chain Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 139

5.3.2 Production, monitoring and maintenance Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 140

5.3.3 Product safety, quality and information Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 141

5.3.4 Access control and tracking and tracing of individuals Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 142

5.3.5 Loyalty, membership and payment Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 143

5.3.6 Household Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 143

5.3.7 Other applications Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 144

5.4 Ongoing research projects Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 144

5.4.1 Hardware issues Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 145

5.4.2 Protocols Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 146

5.5 Summary and conclusions Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 152

5.6 Bibliography Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 153

Chapter 6 RFID Deployment for Location and Mobility Management on the Internet Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 157

6.1 Introduction Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 157

6.2 Background and related work Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 159

6.2.1 Localization Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 159

6.2.2 Mobility management Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 164

6.3 Localization and handover management relying on RFID Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 169

6.3.1 A technology overview of RFID Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 169

6.3.2 How RFID can help localization and mobility management Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 170

6.3.3 Conceptual framework Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 172

6.4 Technology considerations Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 176

6.4.1 Path loss model Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 176

6.4.2 Antenna radiation pattern Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 177

6.4.3 Multiple tags-to-reader collisions Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 177

6.4.4 Multiple readers-to-tag collisions Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 178

6.4.5 Reader-to-reader interference Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 179

6.4.6 Interference from specific materials Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 181

6.5 Performance evaluation Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 181

6.5.1 Simulation setup Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 181

6.5.2 Performance results Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 183

6.6 Summary and conclusions Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 187

6.7 Bibliography Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 188

Chapter 7 The Internet of ThingsSetting the Standards Hakima Chaouchi Chaouchi, Hakima 191

7.1 Introduction Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 191

7.2 Standardizing the IoT Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 193

7.2.1 Why standardize? Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 193

7.2.2 What needs to be standardized? Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 194

7.3 Exploiting the potential of RFID Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 196

7.3.1 Technical specifications Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 196

7.3.2 Radio spectrum and electromagnetic compatibility Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 201

7.4 Identification in the IoT Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 202

7.4.1 A variety of data formats Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 203

7.4.2 Locating every thing: IPv6 addresses Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 208

7.4.3 Separating identifiers and locators in IP: the HIP Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 210

7.4.4 Beyond the tag: multimedia information access Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 211

7.5 Promoting ubiquitous networking: any where, any when, any what Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 212

7.5.1 Wireless sensor networks Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 213

7.5.2 Networking the home Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 215

7.5.3 Next generation networks Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 216

7.6 Safeguarding data and consumer privacy Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 217

7.7 Conclusions Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 220

7.8 Bibliography Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 220

Chapter 8 Governance of the Internet of Things Lara Srivastava Srivastava, Lara 223

8.1 Introduction Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 223

8.1.1 Notion of governance Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 223

8.1.2 Aspects of governance Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 224

8.2 Bodies subject to governing principles Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 225

8.2.1 Overview Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 225

8.2.2 Private organizations Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 226

8.2.3 International regulator and supervisor Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 229

8.3 Substantive principles for IoT governance Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 233

8.3.1 Legitimacy and inclusion of stakeholders Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 233

8.3.2 Transparency Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 234

8.3.3 Accountability Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 236

8.4 IoT infrastructure governance Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 239

8.4.1 Robustness Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 239

8.4.2 Availability Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 240

8.4.3 Reliability Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 241

8.4.4 Interoperability Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 242

8.4.5 Access Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 244

8.5 Further governance issues Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 246

8.5.1 Practical implications Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 246

8.5.2 Legal implications Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 247

8.6 Outlook Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 248

8.7 Bibliography Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 248

Conclusion Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 251

List of Authors Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 261

Index Rolf H. Weber Weber, Rolf H. 263

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    RFID, PLC and WSN

    The book describes 3 topics - RFID, power line communications [PLC] and wireless sensor networks [WSNs]. Low level engineering details are largely omitted. But there is enough technical material to perhaps require a background of 1 or 2 years of undergraduate study in engineering or science. It's a good read, without being bogged down in myriad equations.

    Of the topics, RFID and PLC are the most advanced in terms of actual mass deployment. When it comes to actual possible connections to the Internet, RFID is really not apropos. The contexts in which RFID has been deployed [and which are expected to be in the near future] are for companies that might want more inventory control. While in principle such data might then be made available on the Internet, it seems in practice that access will be restricted to within the company.

    PLC is certainly expected to include Internet access. Power companies are acutely interested in this. First for cheaper and easier remote monitoring of electricity usage. Second for selling Internet access to their customers, and this last mile access is very expensive for competing implementations.

    The WSN is the furthest from any large commercial usage. Mostly, it has been done in various research contexts. And as far as Internet access is concerned, this might be from the Internet to a base station that controls a WSN. But it does not extend to actually communicating with a sensor node inside that network, due to the limited power and bandwidth of such nodes.

    If you are interested in learning more about WSN, the publisher offers an entire recent text devoted to extensive discourse, Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks: Algorithms and Protocols for Scalable Coordination and Data Communication

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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