The Internment of Japanese Americans During World War II: Detention of American Citizens

The Internment of Japanese Americans During World War II: Detention of American Citizens

by John C. Davenport
     
 

In the aftermath of the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, America was gripped by war fever. The United States had been attacked by Japan not at some faraway outpost but at home, on American soil. The desire for revenge that swept the nation, however, was tinged with fear. Would the Japanese attack again? Would the mainland United States be the next

Overview

In the aftermath of the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, America was gripped by war fever. The United States had been attacked by Japan not at some faraway outpost but at home, on American soil. The desire for revenge that swept the nation, however, was tinged with fear. Would the Japanese attack again? Would the mainland United States be the next target? Were Japanese spies and saboteurs already at work, plotting to strike from within? Most importantly, could Japanese Americans be trusted? This last question was answered with a resounding and official "no," and more than 100,000 loyal Americans paid with their freedom for the actions of an enemy with whom they shared nothing but their ethnicity. The story of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of the most tragic tales in U.S. history. Yet it is a story not merely of injustice and racial hatred but also one of courage and dignity on the part of a minority sacrificed to the fears and prejudices of a nation at war.

Milestones In American History chronicles the seminal moments of American history through the words and actions of the people who played significant roles in these events.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—This blow-by-blow account begins with a description of the shock and disbelief that accompanied the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Proceeding in chronological order, clearly written chapters outline the impact of the bombing, the history of Japanese immigrants and citizens in the United States, Executive Order 9066 (permitting evacuation and internment of Japanese citizens on the West coast), Japanese American participation in the armed forces, reparations, and the legacy left by the internment. The text is detailed and clear, extended well by period photos, both in black-and-white and color. Sidebars highlight areas of particular interest, such as the actual language of Executive Order 9066, primary-source recounting of life in the camps, and the Military Intelligence Service Language School. This is a logical next step for students who read Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston's Farewell to Manzanar (Random, 1983) or Michael O. Tunnell's The Children of Topaz (Holiday House, 1996) and want to fill in the gaps in their knowledge. A sound reference and research work.—Ann Welton, Helen B. Stafford Elementary, Tacoma, WA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604136814
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Milestones in American History Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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