The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France

The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France

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by Todd Shepard
     
 

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ISBN-10: 080147454X

ISBN-13: 9780801474545

Pub. Date: 02/28/2008

Publisher: Cornell University Press

In this account of the Algerian War's effect on French political structures and notions of national identity, Todd Shepard asserts that the separation of Algeria from France was truly a revolutionary event with lasting consequences for French social and political life. For more than a century, Algeria had been legally and administratively part of France; after the

Overview

In this account of the Algerian War's effect on French political structures and notions of national identity, Todd Shepard asserts that the separation of Algeria from France was truly a revolutionary event with lasting consequences for French social and political life. For more than a century, Algeria had been legally and administratively part of France; after the bloody war that concluded in 1962, it was other—its eight million Algerian residents deprived of French citizenship while hundreds of thousands of French pieds noirs were forced to return to a country that was never home. This rupture violated the universalism that had been the essence of French republican theory since the late eighteenth century. Shepard contends that because the amputation of Algeria from the French body politic was accomplished illegally and without explanation, its repercussions are responsible for many of the racial and religious tensions that confront France today. In portraying decolonization as an essential step in the inexorable "tide of history," the French state absolved itself of responsibility for the revolutionary change it was effecting. It thereby turned its back not only on the French of Algeria—Muslims in particular—but also on its own republican principles and the 1958 Constitution. From that point onward, debates over assimilation, identity, and citizenship—once focused on the Algerian "province/colony"—have troubled France itself. In addition to grappling with questions of race, citizenship, national identity, state institutions, and political debate, Shepard also addresses debates in Jewish history, gender history, and queer theory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801474545
Publisher:
Cornell University Press
Publication date:
02/28/2008
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
1,132,393
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

List of Abbreviations
Chronology of French Occupation of Algeria

Introduction

Part I; The Making and Forgetting of French Algeria
1. Muslim French Citizens from Algeria: A Short History
2. Inventing Decolonization
3. The "Tide of History" versus the Laws of the Republic
4. Forgetting French Algeria

Part II: Between France and Algeria
5. Making Algerians
6. Repatriation Rather Than Aliyah: The Jews of France and the End of French Algeria
7. Veiled "Muslim" Women, Violent Pied Noir Men, and the Family of France: Gender, Sexuality, and Ethnic Difference

Part III: The Exodus and After
8. Repatriating the Europeans
9. Rejecting the Muslims
10. The Post-Algerian Republic

Conclusion: Forgetting Algerian France

Bibliography of Primary Sources
Index

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The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was assigned for a modern European history graduate course. Not one of us said anything nice about it, including our professor who regretted choosing this book. It was a WASTE of $20 and I wish I could return it. The writing is horribly convoluted. The first chapter wastes too much time on the same topic in every single paragraph. Where was the editor to fix that?! I kept rereading the same sentence over and over again, looking for the thought that could actually mean something. The writing lacks clarity and eloquence. Why there is academic praise for this monograph? It is the worst book on decolonization! Don't waste your money on this book!