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The Invisible Peril: The Problem of Teen Dating Violence
     

The Invisible Peril: The Problem of Teen Dating Violence

2.0 1
by Susan M. Sanders
 
Invisible – because it does not command the attention of the media as do school shootings, gang warfare, or date rape – the violence that teenage women experience while dating includes emotional, physical, and sexual abuse. Using survey and interview data from approximately five hundred female high school juniors, this book measures the incidence of dating

Overview

Invisible – because it does not command the attention of the media as do school shootings, gang warfare, or date rape – the violence that teenage women experience while dating includes emotional, physical, and sexual abuse. Using survey and interview data from approximately five hundred female high school juniors, this book measures the incidence of dating violence among teenage females. The research shows that many have been or are currently involved in abusive relationships with their boyfriends, and many adolescent women are confused about what constitutes normal and healthy dating behaviors. Unlike other books, Teen Dating Violence examines the needs of minors and also provides checklists of abuser characteristics.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
«Teen Dating Violence provides valuable resources for those working with young people. Through the use of personal stories and current research data, the author raises our consciousness regarding the causes and consequences of dating violence. The book captures the effects dating violence has on those involved and on our society.» (Teresa LeCompte, teacher, Mother McAuley Liberal Arts High School, Chicago)
«Dr. Sanders’ work on date rape and date violence makes visible another, frequently hidden, form of violence. Dating violence affects the lives of an estimated one-third to two-thirds of our children, adolescents, and young adults. Yet, little research has been conducted on this subject, limiting knowledge and understanding of the nature and scope of the issues and care needed by the victims and their families. Through the use of stories of real life situations, Dr. Sanders gives voice to these victims and their family members. She also highlights the need for competent, compassionate care and for social and legal policy reform.» (Mary Lebold, Dean of School of Nursing, Saint Xavier University, Chicago)
«Clear and insightful, this is a solidly researched book with startling implications for teens and those involved with guiding them through this often treacherous life passage. As a seasoned clinician, I had a wake up call after reading this book! If you think there are no differences between violence against women and teenage girls, and the way in which these differences are handled in our social, educational, and criminal justice systems, you need to read this book!» (Judith Kelly, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Oak Lawn, IL)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820457628
Publisher:
Peter Lang Publishing Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2004
Series:
Adolescent Cultures, School and Society Series , #24
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
177
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.06(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

The Author: Susan M. Sanders is Director of the Center for Religion and Public Discourse and Associate Professor of History and Political Science at Saint Xavier University in Chicago. She received her M.P.P. and Ph.D. in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Chicago, respectively. Dr. Sanders has taught policy analysis, ethics, and statistics at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Chicago, and DePaul University in Chicago, where she was Associate Professor of Public Services for eleven years before coming to Saint Xavier University in 2001. A member of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas (Chicago Region), a Catholic congregation of religious women, Dr. Sanders lectures widely on teen dating violence and the economic and organizational aspects of nonprofit organizations.

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The Invisible Peril: The Problem of Teen Dating Violence 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JUlianawhiteeee More than 1 year ago
Overall, I was not totally in love with this book. This was not a topic that I was particularly aware of nor interested in, but I figured I would give it a try. Although this book gave a really informative overview of the perils of teen dating violence and certainly stressed the importance of awareness on the issue, a lot of the information seemed outdated and I did not love the author's style of writing. Something about it made it quite hard to focus my whole attention on the topic of the book, because I was very bored most of the time. Also, much of the book was common knowledge and sense being repeatedly stressed. Chapter after Chapter the author would repeat obvious things such as : "signs of dating abuse: he kicks his significant other". Well, obviously. It does not take an expert on teen dating violence to come to that conclusion. But, although I was not in love with this book, it certainly had some good aspects. The author starting off the book by telling 3 vastly different stories about dating abuse was powerful, though, especially when she told the story of Lisa, who was murdered at the hand of her ex boyfriend. And another woman, who dealt with her husbands long time physical and emotional abuse toward her AND her children. It also gave constructive criticism of current teen dating policies, which I found refreshing. Most authors provide much criticism to the topic they are writing about, but rarely offer a solution, which Sanders did. In some way the author did achieve her purpose. I certainly feel more strongly about teen dating violence and am much more aware of it after reading this book. I suppose, overall, if you are interested in this topic, you may find this book interesting. But if not, I would not reccomend it. -Juliana W