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The Irish Heritage Cookbook
     

The Irish Heritage Cookbook

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by Margaret Johnson, Chronicle Books
 

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Roughly 44 million Americans of Irish descent, though understandably proud of their heritage, have grown up with a shocking degree of cultural deprivation with regard to the culinary traditions of their ancestors. For most, Irish cuisine means potatoes, corned beef, and cabbage. Now at last, The Irish Heritage Cookbook will set the record straight. Margaret

Overview

Roughly 44 million Americans of Irish descent, though understandably proud of their heritage, have grown up with a shocking degree of cultural deprivation with regard to the culinary traditions of their ancestors. For most, Irish cuisine means potatoes, corned beef, and cabbage. Now at last, The Irish Heritage Cookbook will set the record straight. Margaret Johnson offers a much-needed fresh perspective on what Irish cooking is all about. She tells stories about the foods of Erin and how these dishes were reinvented by Irish emigrants and their offspring, evolving to include new ingredients and to suit modern circumstances and tastes. Offering a bountiful collection of both traditional recipes and contemporary innovations from a host of chefs and cooks in the Old Country and the New, The Irish Heritage Cookbook affirms at last the place of Irish cooking among the great cuisines of the worldand one to be enjoyed by all who love Ireland.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Food writer and Massachusetts native Johnson delivers a fresh perspective on Irish cookery with an engaging collection of recipes culled from Irish (and Irish-American) chefs, hoteliers and long-time home cooks who have reinterpreted traditional dishes with earthy panache. Organized by topography--hill, dale, waters, etc.--chapters include historic sidebars and anecdotes, such as information on medieval Irish castle banquets. Despite an occasional gourmet detour (e.g., Mussel Soup with Oatmeal-Herb Crust or Warm Woodland Salad with Champagne Vinaigrette), robust, rustic Irish cooking prevails. Recipes are not for the diet conscious: copious amounts of butter and cream, meat-with-meat pairings and other caloric combinations predominate (e.g., Black Pudding Roisin, with pig blood sausage; Dublin Coddle, a pork, bacon and potato casserole; Quail with Chestnut Stuffing and Burgundy Sauce). Ireland's culinary "roots" (carrots, turnips, parsnips and tubers) as well as distinctly Irish libations (stout, whiskey and poitins, a distillation of barley, sugar and water), punctuate many recipes. Relatively uncomplicated, many of these meals involve minimal preparation time and can be easily rendered by novice home cooks. Looking beyond boiled potatoes and cabbage, Johnson provides valuable insight into Ireland's gastronomic heritage. (Mar.)
Darina Molloy
...[A]n impressive collection of recipes....The basic staples are also accounted for...
Irish America Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811819923
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
1.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Margaret Johnson grew up in a traditional Irish-Catholic neighborhood in Massachusetts. A high school teacher in New York state, she takes advantage of her long summer vacations to travel to Ireland regularly, and has published numerous Irish travel and food articles.

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The Irish Heritage Cookbook 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I attempted to make the potato-apple cake over the weekend. I like to pride myself in being a great baker. The recipe was a disaster and after making it, I realized a lot of tips that the author left out such as completing cooling off the mashed potatoes and chilling the 'dough' in the fridge for about 30 min before rolling it out. The failure of this recipe and the lack of specific details by the author makes me hesitant to try anything else. Luckily, I only just checked this book out of the library.