Overview

Koans are the intellectually unsolvable problem-riddles at the core of the Rinzai tradition of Zen Buddhism, perhaps the most well-known one being "what is the sound of one hand clapping." Though widely recognized, most koan remain narrowly understood. In this new edition of The Iron Flute, one hundred of the most challenging and enlightening koan from the Chinese Chan (Zen) patriarchs of the Tang and Sung dynasties are presented, along with commentary from the great Zen masters Genro, Fugai, and Nyogen, and an ...
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The Iron Flute

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Overview

Koans are the intellectually unsolvable problem-riddles at the core of the Rinzai tradition of Zen Buddhism, perhaps the most well-known one being "what is the sound of one hand clapping." Though widely recognized, most koan remain narrowly understood. In this new edition of The Iron Flute, one hundred of the most challenging and enlightening koan from the Chinese Chan (Zen) patriarchs of the Tang and Sung dynasties are presented, along with commentary from the great Zen masters Genro, Fugai, and Nyogen, and an in-depth biography of author Nyogen Senzaki (1876-1958), a pioneer in bringing Zen Buddhism to the West. The Iron Flute stands alone as the definitive work on koan-an essential pathway to the tenets and practice of Zen Buddhism. AUTHOR BIOS: Nyogen Senzaki was raised in Tendai Buddhist monastery and ordained as a Zen monk after attending Tokyo Imperial University, where he was a student of the great Zen master Soen Shoku. He moved to the U.S. in 1905 and lived in Los Angeles until his death in 1958. Ruth Strout McCandless was a student of Senzaki and his collaborator in translating a series of Buddhist texts over many years. She and Senzaki also co-authored Buddhism and Zen.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781462901982
  • Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/26/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 174
  • File size: 3 MB

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2004

    What goes up must.

    Zen is about waking up. Koans are mental alarm clocks with an attitude. In order to hit one's target in the dark one needs to focus one's attention on the periphery. A counter-intuitive but effective means of hitting the non-visible mark. Such are Zen Koans. The target is non-duality. That for which there is no second cannot be understood conceptually. But it can be experienced when we look past the signs. Words fail me. But speak I must. Such are Koans. What is the sound of one hand clapping? The sound of silence? Perhaps. The Great Dao manifests itself dualistically by means of seeming opposites, yin and yang. Zen is seeing past seeming opposites to the underlying unitive process. Zen is many things. Zen is nothing. Zen is balance. Zen is motion. Zen is still. Zen is here and now. Zen never was and never will be. Zen is. Zen isn't. The Zen that can be described is not Zen. Zen is the way things are. Humility is the key. False Zen is mind control. Such is pride. True Zen is no mind. No distinctions. All is whole. All is a doughnut. Zen mind is free of conception and thus open to direct experience. All is not one. All is numberless. An irrational whole. There is no other whole. A numberless whole is more than enough. Much more. Eternity is waking up. Eternity never sleeps. Everything is interconnected. Your issues are mine. You are my brother's keeper. To change the world change your perspective. There is one Mind commmon to each individual man. Was Emerson a Zen master? Dance a jig to the music of the Iron Flute. Get off my foot you clumsy oaf. I am hardest on my self. I'm a uniter not a divider. Yes I am. Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?

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