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The Irreducible Needs Of Children
     

The Irreducible Needs Of Children

5.0 2
by T. Berry Brazelton, Stanley I. Greenspan
 

What do babies and young children really need? This impassioned dialogue cuts through all the theories, platitudes, and controversies that surround parenting advice to define what every child must have in the first years of life. The authors, both famed advocates for children, lay out the seven irreducible needs of any child, in any society, and confront such

Overview

What do babies and young children really need? This impassioned dialogue cuts through all the theories, platitudes, and controversies that surround parenting advice to define what every child must have in the first years of life. The authors, both famed advocates for children, lay out the seven irreducible needs of any child, in any society, and confront such thorny questions as: How much time do children need one-on-one with a parent? What is the effect of shifting caregivers, of custody arrangements? Why are we knowingly letting children fail in school? Nothing is off limits, even such an issue as whether every child needs or deserves to be a wanted child. This short, hard-hitting book, the fruit of decades of experience and caring, sounds a wake-up call for parents, teachers, judges, social workers, policy makers-anyone who cares about the welfare of children.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738203256
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
10/18/2000
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
5.78(w) x 9.49(h) x 0.87(d)
Lexile:
1250L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., founder of the Child Development Unit at Children's Hospital Boston, is Clinical Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Pediatrics and Human Development at Brown University. He is a famed advocate for children, and his many other internationally acclaimed books for parents include To Listen to a Child, Infants and Mothers , and, with Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., The Irreducible Needs of Children . Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., author of the widely used and praised books The Challenging Child and (with Serena Wieder, Ph.D.) Engaging Autism , is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at George Washington University Medical School and lives in Bethesda, Maryland.

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The Irreducible Needs Of Children 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Many of you will not see this book as being conducive to your now over-scheduled lifestyles. You will fret over who in the heck the authors think they are. You may even question their insight into strict T.V. viewing, and if your child is in child care, wonder why they say you'd better reduce it. It's going to make you sad or glad and want to scream or shout. But, it's right on the money! For the love of the world and all children, take heart and take care of them NOW. The tone is happy, soft, caring, hopeful and very much needed in-your-face-do-it-today or else...., parenting for life skills. Isn't it about time we became nicer to our children and each other? Don't like changes - then skip this book - but remember - we told you so if your children run you nuts when they are teens. Take a stand for kids today. Bold suggestions: To add to your library of parenting books and life in general - there are two similar books everyone should have around for successful kids, 'MOMMY-CEO' (funny and cheerful with positive parenting skills)and 'Baby & Child Question and Answer Book.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
The daycare debate has been raging ever since mothers entered the workforce en masse some 30 years ago. At first, moms were concerned about the effects daycare would have on their kids, but the siren song of fulfilling careers proved too tempting to ignore. Over the years, doubts were kept in check by suspect research, and more recently by the 'it takes a village' people. Then in March 1999, working moms everywhere breathed a collective sigh of relief after The Washington Post ran the results of a major, long-term study claiming that full-time daycare causes no long-term psychological harm in children. The problem was that the study was so full of holes that it should never have been published in the first place, and was immediately discredited by child development experts. But the warm fuzzies the study created among working mothers remained. Now two of the nation's top child-development experts have weighed in. In their new book, 'The Irreducible Needs of Children: What Every Child Must Have to Grow, Learn, and Flourish,' pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton and child psychiatrist Stanley Greenspan layout the seven irreducible needs of every child. Among those needs is considerably more one-on-one time with parents than many kids are now getting, especially those whose parents both work full-time. The book's brief but concise analysis includes a challenge to the notion that full-time daycare is harmless to kids. Brazelton and Greenspan tell parents what most of us have known all along -- that full-time daycare is a poor substitute for a loving and involved parent. While acknowledging that some families do need two incomes to make ends meet, and that single parents obviously must work, the authors urge parents to carefully consider the needs of their children in planning their lives, and to avoid using full-time daycare whenever possible.