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The Japanese American Internment: Civil Liberties Denied
     

The Japanese American Internment: Civil Liberties Denied

by Michael Burgan, Burgon
 

On December 7, 1941, Japanese warplanes bombed the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, bringing the United States into World War II. U.S. leaders feared that Japanese Americans would betray the United States to help Japan. The federal government moved Japanese people from their homes in the United States into special camps called relocation centers. Many

Overview

On December 7, 1941, Japanese warplanes bombed the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, bringing the United States into World War II. U.S. leaders feared that Japanese Americans would betray the United States to help Japan. The federal government moved Japanese people from their homes in the United States into special camps called relocation centers. Many internees felt that their fundamental rights as U.S. citizens had been denied. Other Americans agreed, and the government's actions during wartime are still being debated today.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Pat Sherman
During World War II nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans were imprisoned in interment camps. Many of them had actually been born in the United States. Others had immigrated from Japan and devoted themselves to building homes and businesses in their new country. None of this helped, however, in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor. On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 1099, which gave him the power to remove Japanese- Americans from their homes, seize their property, and strip them of citizenship. Michael Burgan illuminates this disturbing chapter in U.S. history with careful research and compassion. Rather than simply vilifying the government, he shows how fear and confusion led to bad decisions. He also emphasizes the positive ways in which Japanese-Americans opposed racism. Young men volunteered for military service. Women and older people assisted the war effort by working on farms near the camps. One young woman took her case against Order 1099 all the way to the Supreme Court. In December 1944 the Court ruled unanimously in favor of Mitsuye Endo, who claimed that she was a loyal citizen being held against her will. The Court's decision dismantled the camps and Endo became a quiet hero of American history, one who proved that the Constitution did indeed protect people of all races and backgrounds. Burgan enhances his text with a time line, informative sidebars, and well chosen photographs. A glossary, bibliography, and sources for further reading are included too. Part of the "Snapshots in History" series.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756524531
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Series:
Living in a Biome Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1090L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

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