The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse

The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse

3.7 4
by Sherry Shavor, Jim D'Anjou, Dan Kehn, Pat McCarthy
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321159640

ISBN-13: 9780321159649

Pub. Date: 05/19/2003

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

Eclipse is a world class Java IDE, a platform for building and integrating application development tools, and an open source project and community. Eclipse is the foundation of IBM's WebSphere Studio family of tools and of a rapidly growing number of other commercial tool and application offerings from a wide spectrum of software providers. In its first year,

Overview

Eclipse is a world class Java IDE, a platform for building and integrating application development tools, and an open source project and community. Eclipse is the foundation of IBM's WebSphere Studio family of tools and of a rapidly growing number of other commercial tool and application offerings from a wide spectrum of software providers. In its first year, eclipse.org processed over three million Eclipse download requests from over 100 countries. There are over 100 open source projects based on Eclipse. Over 175 commercial organizations are developing Eclipse-based offerings.

Written by members of the IBM Jumpstart team, The Java™ Developer's Guide to Eclipse is the definitive Eclipse companion. Drawing on their considerable experience teaching Eclipse and mentoring developers, the authors provide guidance on how to customize Eclipse for increased productivity and efficiency and how to avoid common pitfalls.

Key coverage includes:

  • Eclipse navigation and terminology
  • Eclipse and the Java development environment
  • Extending Eclipse, the plug-in architecture, and Eclipse frameworks

Those new to Eclipse will benefit from the directed exercises on how to use the Eclipse platform. Advanced developers can learn how to extend Eclipse and use this book as a reference to the Eclipse frameworks.

An accompanying CD-ROM contains Eclipse SDK version 2.0, as well as exercise solutions and many code examples to make learning Eclipse easier. Whether you want to use Eclipse and Eclipse-based offerings as your integrated development environment (IDE), or customize Eclipse further, you'll find The Java™ Developer's Guide to Eclipse the complete ready reference.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321159649
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
05/19/2003
Pages:
896
Product dimensions:
7.32(w) x 9.22(h) x 1.68(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword by Dan Thomson.
Preface.
Acknowledgments.
About the Authors.

I. RUNNING ECLIPSE.

1. Getting Started.
The Software Challenge and Eclipse.
What Is Eclipse?
What Is the Common Public License?
Getting and Installing Eclipse.
The Eclipse Look.
Working in Eclipse.
A Word to IBM VisualAge Users.
Summary.
References.

2. Using Eclipse.
Getting Started.
Manipulating the User Interface.
Resource Management.
Customizing Eclipse.
More on Preferences.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.

3. Using Java Development Tools.
Getting Started.
Searching.
Writing Java Code.
Running Java Code.
Working with Java Elements.
Tuning the Performance of JDT.
More on JDT Views and Perspectives.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.

4. Debugging Java.
Overview.
The Fundamentals.
Additional Debugging Capabilities.
More on Breakpoints.
Debug Launch Configurations.
Associating Source with Your Programs.
Hot Code Replace.
Remote Debugging.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.

5. Teaming Up with Eclipse.
Eclipse Support for CVS.
General Team Support by Eclipse.
An Overview of CVS for the Novice.
The CVS User Interface in Eclipse.
Special Situations and How to Handle Them.
Additional Features.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

6. Eclipse Configuration Management.
Structure of an Eclipse Installation.
Update Manager - An Introduction.
Managing Configuration Processing.
Summary.

II. EXTENDING ECLIPSE.


7. Overview of the Eclipse Architecture.
Eclipse Platform.
Summary.
References.

8. Getting Started: Plug-in Development.
Getting Started with Plug-ins.
Getting Started with Extension and Extensions Points.
Basic Steps of Implementing a Plug-in.
Using the Plug-in Development Environment.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

9. Action Contributions: The Integration Fast Track.
Action Contribution Extension Points.
The Fundamentals of Action Contributions.
Contributing to the Workbench Menu and Toolbar.
Contributing to the View's Menu and Toolbar.
Contributing to an Editor's Menu and Toolbar.
Contributing Context Menus to View's and Editors.
Summary.
References.

10. The Standard Widget Toolkit: A Lean Mean Widget Machine.
The Basic Structure of an SWT Application
Common SWT Widgets.
Responding to Widget Events.
How to Layout SWT Widgets Using Layout Managers.
Error Handling.
Widgets Have Special Disposal Requirements.
Using Threads to Separate UI and Non-UI Activities.
An Overview of SWT Packages.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

11. Dialogs and Wizards.
Dialogs--You Can Find Them Everywhere.
Extending the Preference Page Dialog to Add Your Own Tool Options.
Using Property Pages to Remember Something Special About a Resource.
Using Wizards to Extend Workbench Resource Creation and Import/Export Support.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

12. Views.
View Behavior and Architecture.
Basic Implementation Steps.
Interacting with Other Views.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

13. Editors.
Editor Behavior and Architecture.
Basic Implementation Steps.
Linking Editor and Outline View.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

14. Perspectives.
Perspectives.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

15. Workspace Resource Programming.
Resource Concepts.
Workspace API.
Resource Properties.
Processing Workspace Change Events.
Using Workspace Save Events to Save Critical Data.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

16. Managing Resources with Natures and Builders.
Customizing Project Processing.
Defining and Implementing Natures.
Implementing a Custom Builder.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

17. Resource Tagging Using Markers.
Marker Concepts.
Creating Markers for Customized Resource Tagging.
Creating New Marker Types.
Extending Markers with Help and Resolution Support.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

18. Contributions Revisited.
Example Contributions.
A Few More Contribution Nuggets.
Summary.

19. Advanced Plug-in Development.
Plug-in Class Loader.
Run-time Discovery and Delayed Loading.
Plug-in Granularity.
Plug-in Fragments.
Summary.
References.

20. Creating New Extension Points: How Others Can Extend Your Plug-in.
Overview of the Eclipse Architecture, Revisited.
How to Define New Extension Points.
How to Enable the Schema-Based New Extension Wizard.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

21. Serviceability.
Plug-in Diagnostics: System and Configuration Information.
Workbench Status Objects: A Status collector.
Exception Handling: Error Detection.
Error Dialogs: Providing Detailed Status in Error Messages.
Runtime Tracing: A Runtime Diagnostic Tool.
Using Trace In a Production Environment.
Diagnostics: A Comprehensive Error Log.
Error Logging: Writing to the Workbench Error Log.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.

22. Developing Features.
All About Features.
Feature Definition.
Feature Branding.
Building on Eclipse.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

23. Providing Help.
Integrating Your Online Documentation.
Creating Context Sensitive Help.
Running Non-integrated Help.
Customizing your Help System.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

24. OLE and ActiveX Interoperability.
COM Support in Eclipse.
COM Container Support.
OLE Automation--Accessing Extended Behavior.
Exercise Summary.
Summary of OLE Interoperability.
References.

25. Swing Interoperability.
Background on Integration of Swing and SWT.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

26. Extending the Java Development Tools (JDT).
What Is the JDT and What Does It Do?
Java Model.
Accessing Reusable JDT Functionality.
Compiling Java Code.
Analyzing Java Source Code.
Manipulating Java Source Code.
Where the JDT Extends Eclipse.
Extending the JDT User Interface.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

27. Building a Custom Text Editor with JFace Text.
Standard Text Editor Functions.
Editor Configuration: Customization Points.
Under the Covers of the Text Editor.
How to Create a Basic Source Editor.
Exercise Summary.
Summary.
References.

III. EXERCISES.


28. Exercise 1: Using Eclipse.
Introduction.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Instructions.
Section 1: Your First Eclipse Project.
Section 2: Editors and Views.
Section 3: Working with Resources.
Section 4: Perspectives.
Section 5: Using Multiple Eclipse Windows.
Section 6: Getting Help.
Exercise Activity Review.

29. Exercise 2: Using the Java Development Tools (JDT).
Introduction.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Instructions.
Section 1: Hello World.
Section 2: Quick Fix.
Section 3: Code Generation.
Section 4: Refactoring.
Section 5: Launch Configurations.
Section 6: JRE 1.4 code.
Exercise Activity Review.

30. Exercise 3: Debugging Java.
Introduction.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Instructions.
Section 1: Debugging.
Section 2: Debugging Threads.
Section 3: Remote Debugging.
Exercise Activity Review.

31. Exercise 4: Using CVS with Eclipse.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Setup.
Exercise Instructions.
Section 1: Getting Started.
Section 2: Updating, Committing, and Resolving Conflicts.
Section 3: Branching and Merging.
Exercise Activity Review.

32. Exercise 5: Modifying Your Configuration with Update Manager.
Section 1: Installing New Features.
Section 2: Disabling Features.
Section 3: Pending Changes - Discovering Direct Configuration Modification.
Section 4: Searching for New or Updated Features.
Exercise Activity Review.

33. Exercise 6: Using the Plug-in Development Environment.
Introduction.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Setup.
Exercise Instructions.
"Hello, World" in Five Minutes or Less.
"Hello, World" with Detailed Step-By-Step Instructions.
Testing with the Run-time Workbench.
Debugging with the Run-time Workbench.
Exploring (and Sometimes Correcting) the Eclipse Platform Code.
Correcting Common Problems.
Exercise Activity Review.

34. Exercise 7: Feature Development and Deployment.
Introduction.
Exercise Concepts.
Skill Development Goals.
Exercise Setup.
Exercise Instructions.
Section 1: Tasks of an Eclipse Feature Developer.
Section 2: Tasks of an Eclipse User.
Section 3: Tasks of a Product Developer.
Exercise Activity Review.

Index.

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The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Plugins are governing the application world.This book will help a profession develop plugins faster and write better code
Guest More than 1 year ago
This books puts alot of words in the pages that don't tell you anything. Honestly folks read the online material, pratice using the wizard over an over until you understand the code that is generated. Then be resourceful and use online material. This book is a COMPLETE WASTE OF MONEY! It gets one star because the rating system will not allow ZERO.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Who could have imagined just a few years ago that IBM, of all companies, would standardise on the open source linux? For years, IBM was notorious for lock-in on its operating systems. But it really does seem to have changed wholeheartedly. Along those lines is their development of Eclipse, a Java Integrated Development Environment. It is not restricted to running under linux; versions are available for Microsoft OSes as well. Going the extra step, IBM pushed it into open source. To back it up with professional level documentation, IBM has just put out this book. Persuasively written, it advances Eclipose as more than just another IDE (like IBM's Visual Age). Eclipse is not another meter on your car's dashboard. It aspires to be the entire dashboard. A tool integrator. That is free and with all the source available, in case you are a tool maker and need to tinker with integration-level issues. An analogy is the Microsoft Office suite, which tries, and indeed mostly succeeds, at meeting office computing needs. There, of course, the source is not public and the applications are not free. But beyond mindshare, I am not sure that IBM gets anything else from giving up Eclipse. Sure, it will get some royalties from the sale of this book and other documentation, but that surely cannot pay for what must have been a considerable development cost. Then again, mindshare amongst a potential customer base is no small thing. Very effective advertising. Also too, IBM probably and very naturally has the most knowledgeable users of Eclipse, so no doubt it can offer their consulting expertise. This would be along the lines of IBM moving away from the simple sale of hardware and software into the higher margined uplands of services. You can think of this book as helping validate your usage of Eclipse. Much cheaper than hiring a consultant to teach you Eclipse!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I not only reviewed a pre-published version of this book, but this book proved very valuable in developing a commercially available and award winning Eclipse Plug-In. The text is clear, the examples are well thought out, and there are plenty of ¿real world¿ exercises. The combination of all three of these elements prepares you to use Eclipse to its fullest and to extend it in the best way possible.

I have finished reading many technical books believing I understood the topic only to discover when I had to put that knowledge to work, I did not get the whole story in the book. After reading The Java Developer¿s Guide to Eclipse and writing a plug-in based on that knowledge, I can say that this book aces that test.