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The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America and the Meaning of Jazz / Edition 1
     

The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America and the Meaning of Jazz / Edition 1

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by Kathy J. Ogren
 

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ISBN-10: 0195074793

ISBN-13: 9780195074796

Pub. Date: 05/28/1992

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

In this illuminating work, Kathy Ogren places jazz-a controversial form at its inception-in the social and cultural context of 1920s America and sheds new light on its impact on the nation. She traces its dissemination from the honky-tonk of New Orleans, New York, and Chicago, to the clubs and cabarets of such places as Kansas City and Los Angeles, and further to the

Overview

In this illuminating work, Kathy Ogren places jazz-a controversial form at its inception-in the social and cultural context of 1920s America and sheds new light on its impact on the nation. She traces its dissemination from the honky-tonk of New Orleans, New York, and Chicago, to the clubs and cabarets of such places as Kansas City and Los Angeles, and further to the airwaves.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195074796
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
05/28/1992
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 5.31(h) x 0.50(d)

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The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America and the Meaning of Jazz 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Jazz Revolution: Twenties America and the Meaning of Jazz isn't just a great book for jazz lovers, it is also a valuable find for anyone who appreciates American History. I first noticed this author on a NPR TV show about jazz and then was doubly interested since she and I have the same, not too common last name. Kathy Ogren is a professor but she writes in a way that is not overly academic and that would be interesting to all literate music lovers. This history of jazz is also an intense look into certain cultures of that time, a time when blacks were largely ignored by most whites--or far worse. Jazz, with its close connection to American blacks, was seen by many in authority as something bad, something that could easily undermine the children of good God-fearing whites. Jazz didn't come of age easily. This is a fine read, terribly interesting.