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The Jerrie Mock Story: The First Woman to Fly Solo around the World
     

The Jerrie Mock Story: The First Woman to Fly Solo around the World

5.0 1
by Nancy Roe Pimm
 

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The Jerrie Mock Story is the rewarding tale of a feisty woman who not only followed her dream, but made it happen.”
— Dorothy S. Cochrane, curator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum  

In this biography for middle-grade readers, Nancy Roe Pimm tells the story of Geraldine “Jerrie” Mock, the first woman

Overview

The Jerrie Mock Story is the rewarding tale of a feisty woman who not only followed her dream, but made it happen.”
— Dorothy S. Cochrane, curator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum  

In this biography for middle-grade readers, Nancy Roe Pimm tells the story of Geraldine “Jerrie” Mock, the first woman to fly solo around the world. In her trusty Cessna, The Spirit of Columbus—also known as Charlie—she traveled from Columbus, Ohio, on an eastward route that totaled nearly twenty-three thousand miles and took almost a month. Overcoming wind, ice, mechanical problems, and maybe even sabotage, Mock persevered.

Mock caught the aviation bug at seven years old, when she rode in a Ford Trimotor plane with her parents. In high school, she displayed a talent for math and science, and she was the only woman in her aeronautical engineering classes at Ohio State University. Although she then settled into domestic life, she never lost her interest in flying. What began as a joking suggestion from her husband to fly around the world prompted her to pursue her childhood dream. But the dream became a race, as another woman, Joan Merriam Smith, also sought to be the first to circle the globe.

Even though Mock beat Smith and accomplished what her heroine Amelia Earhart had died trying to do, her feat was overshadowed by the Vietnam War and other world events. Now, Pimm introduces Mock to a new generation of adventurers.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This is a high-interest biography of a woman who is less of a household name than her idol, Amelia Earhart, but no less gutsy and accomplished.”
— Booklist

“This often hair-raising tale not only rescues a major aeronautical feat from near-total obscurity, but presents an eye-opening picture of another era’s gender roles and expectations.”
— Kirkus Reviews

“Nancy Roe Pimm’s book makes me feel as though I am visiting with Jerrie again—every detail is there, just as Jerrie shared it with me. Jerrie was a gracious and competent American woman and an unexpected hero who gave closure to Amelia Earhart’s quest. The personal story of our last tie to the golden age of aviation is beautifully presented.”
—Jill Nelson, retired U.S. Navy pilot and friend of Jerrie Mock

“Nancy Roe Pimm has captured Jerrie’s essence and her voice. She shows my sister’s passion for flying and for life. I’m thrilled to know her story will be shared with future generations, so they too will believe in their dreams as they get to know Jerrie, a true American hero.”
—Susan Reid, Jerrie Mock’s younger sister

“Plentifully illustrated with photographs and copies of her passport and flight documents, this is an interesting snap shot of an accomplishment about which not enough people know.” —Ms. Yingling Reads

Kirkus Reviews
2016-01-09
Quick, name the first woman to fly solo around the world! Bet you can't. Spun from interviews with the pilot herself (who died in 2014) and family members, plus a 1970 autobiographical account, this often-hair-raising tale not only rescues a major aeronautical feat from near-total obscurity, but presents an eye-opening picture of another era's gender roles and expectations. Mock faced hazards including high winds, icing, mental exhaustion, and a dead radio on the monthlong 1964 flight. The (as a local newspaper put it) "petite Bexley housewife and mother" also attended to proper dress and shoes along the way. As Pimm describes it, she also had to put up with a controlling husband, who comes across as a real toad by continually urging her to cut out the sightseeing and unilaterally canceling planned tributes in Hawaii to speed her along; he also wasn't above emotional blackmail: "no word from you all day after landing in Tripoli," reads a telegram. "Your mother in tears. Love, Russ." Tedious minor details and irrelevant sidebars make the flight a rough one, but readers will walk away afterward appreciating the magnitude of Mock's accomplishment—and, with help from the broad array of snapshots, news photos, and personal documents, of her spirit and character, too. Loosely knit but notable both for the journey it commemorates and its view of a time's parochial attitudes. (timeline, endnotes, glossary, reading lists) (Biography. 11-14)
VOYA, August 2016 (Vol. 39, No. 3) - Elizabeth Norton
In 1964, Ohio housewife Jerrie Mock became the first woman to fly solo around the world, completing the journey first attempted by Amelia Earhart. Mock made the trip in a single-engine Cessna plane nicknamed “Three-Eight Charlie,” sending articles to her hometown newspaper at every stop. She completed the journey in twenty-nine days, just ahead of Joan Merriam Smith, another American woman attempting to set the same record. This middle-grade biography stresses that Jerrie Mock was just an ordinary person chasing a dream, which is a positive message for today’s youth. Each chapter details one leg of the journey from Mock’s first time in an airplane at age seven until she returned home from her round-the-world flight. Black-and-white photos abound, as well as maps of important places. Each chapter ends with a “Did You Know” section about aviation or the location described in the chapter. Key terms are bolded and a glossary is included. The writing style, however, is stilted and the tone is sometimes condescending, making it hard to become engaged in the story. Readers interested in aviation history will find better accounts in Candace Fleming’s Amelia Lost (Schwartz & Wade, 2011) or Tim Grove’s First Flight Around The World (Abrams, 2015). Reviewer: Elizabeth Norton; Ages 11 to 14.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780821422168
Publisher:
Ohio University Press
Publication date:
03/08/2016
Series:
Biographies for Young Readers Series
Pages:
168
Sales rank:
478,210
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1020L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 12 Years

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The Jerrie Mock Story: The First Woman to Fly Solo around the World 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Full name:Lisabeth Anna Monson Born:Edgewood,Kentucky Now lives:Southeastren Minnesota Age:19 Gender:female Height:5ft.9 Weight:115lb Personality:kind,caring,tough,loving,helpful,thoughtful,strong,independent Appearance:wavy reddish-brown shoulder legneth hair,freckles,blue eyes that change to green or gray,bangs,short torso,long legs and arms,always tan,muscular in legs,arms,and stomach. Sexuality:Bisexual (a little more into male) Status:have been a girlfriend two times (both dumped me) Family:Ryan Andrew Monson,Greta Kathryn Wolfe (sister is married) Pets:8 dogs,4 horses,4 cats,1 hamster Favorite Attire:bootcut jeans,some skinny jeans,jean skirts(worn more than regular skirts),khakis,dresses(rare),blouses,plaid shirts with a tank top under,sweatshirts,hoodies,baggy sweatpants(do not go below waist),and non-baggy sweatpants. Acessories:dark brown leather messenger bag,pendants,earrings,simple silver bracelet chains. Make-up:none sometimes mascara and lipgloss Hobbies:flying,riding horses,training dogs,reading,watch movies,cooking and baking,board game parties,plays clarinet and guitar,recycle for crafts,gather scraps for pigs,collecting postcards from around the world,collecting snowglobes(do not do that much) Favorite subjects:history,geography,reading,Latin Dislikes:brussel sprouts,PE,English(not the language),poetry,cucumbers,asparagus Thank you for reading!