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The Jesus Creed: Loving God, Loving Others
     

The Jesus Creed: Loving God, Loving Others

3.3 7
by Scot McKnight
 

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When an expert in the law asked Jesus for the greatest commandment, Jesus responded with the Shema, the ancient Jewish creed that commands Israel to love God with heart, soul, mind, and strength. But the next part of Jesus' answer would change the course of history. Jesus amended the Shema, giving his followers a new creed for life: to love God with heart, soul, mind,

Overview

When an expert in the law asked Jesus for the greatest commandment, Jesus responded with the Shema, the ancient Jewish creed that commands Israel to love God with heart, soul, mind, and strength. But the next part of Jesus' answer would change the course of history. Jesus amended the Shema, giving his followers a new creed for life: to love God with heart, soul, mind, and strength, but also to love others as themselves. Discover how the Jesus Creed of love for God and others can transform your life.

Editorial Reviews

For a long time [Scot McKnight] has been a kind of secret weapon for my own education and growth. Now he can be yours as well. This book will bring Jesus' world and yours much closer together.
Pastor, Menlo Park Presbyterian Church
Publishers Weekly
Amid a sea of books on Christian spiritual formation, McKnight, professor of religious studies at North Park University in Chicago, brings us a simple, highly readable one focused on the weightiest teaching of Jesus: love God and love others as yourself. The "Jesus Creed" of the title is a trimmed down version of the Shema of Judaism (Deut. 6:4-9), which declares we are to love God with all our being, amended to include caring for one's neighbor as oneself (Lev. 19:18). Packed with vivid and touching stories-from the Bible, history and the author's life-this book covers important aspects of what it means to love God and others. McKnight shows great respect for the Jewish heritage of Jesus and offers readers scholarly, yet highly accessible, illustrations of the sociocultural landscape of first-century Palestine. The book is slim on doctrine, making no comment on the thorny theological squabbles that divide many Christians. That's refreshing for the reader tired of the squabbling, but may leave others wondering what love does require in certain difficult situations. Still, this book is an excellent introduction to Christian spirituality. Its pages glow with compassion, generosity and the invitation to understand what was important to Jesus and what is crucial for Christianity. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557257185
Publisher:
Paraclete Press
Publication date:
09/01/2004
Series:
US
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

SCOT MCKNIGHT, PH.D., is the Karl A. Olsson Professor in Religious Studies at North Park University. He is the award-winning author of The Jesus Creed, 40 Days Living the Jesus Creed, The Real Mary, Embracing Grace, and Praying with the Church , among other books. Scot lives with his wife, Kristen, near Chicago. Author's blog: http://blog.beliefnet.com/jesuscreed/

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The Jesus Creed: Loving God, Loving Others 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
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Ronnie47 More than 1 year ago
The book has a good premise - love God, love your neighbor - but just lacks depth. His ideas about 'the Jesus table' have merit, but again, the author isn't saying anything profound or revelatory. His historical background has little that is new or challenging. The book lacks 'how-tos'. (ie. that's good stuff, now how do I put that into practice?) Seems like a series of sermons done for a congregation that is 'seeker friendly' and not all that mature a Christian audience.