×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Journey Takers
     

The Journey Takers

4.5 2
by Leslie Albrecht Huber
 
Leslie Albrecht Huber's ancestors were journey takers, leaving their homes in Germany, Sweden, and England behind to sail to the US and start new lives here. Huber sets out to trace these journeys and to understand her family - who they were and what mattered to them. As she follows in their footsteps, walking the paths they walked and looking over the land they

Overview

Leslie Albrecht Huber's ancestors were journey takers, leaving their homes in Germany, Sweden, and England behind to sail to the US and start new lives here. Huber sets out to trace these journeys and to understand her family - who they were and what mattered to them. As she follows in their footsteps, walking the paths they walked and looking over the land they farmed, she finds herself on a journey she hadn't expected.
Based on thousands of hours of research, Huber recreates the immigration experience in a way that captures both its sweeping historical breadth and its intimately personal consequences.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780578052144
Publisher:
Foundation Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/01/2010
Pages:
334
Sales rank:
992,414
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Journey Takers 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Tuesdays More than 1 year ago
The fabric of Leslie's ancestors, and the threads that bind the past to her present, are woven into an intriguing tapestry in this, her first book. She has walked in the footsteps of those who preceded her, and she draws the lives that they lived into her own imagination, then onto paper. This book is factual genealogy, colored by the fictional narrative of each person, time and place. Leslie relives in her mind, and on the written page, the thoughts, emotions and purpose of these long ago men, women and children Leslie started on her journey twelve years ago as a carefree, twenty-one year old college student. Her research has carried her to every hamlet where her ancestors lived, and ultimtely left. Many suffered unimaginable hardships and fractured families on their journey to America. She shares with the reader the stench, hunger, disease and disasters on the sailing ships and, later, the rugged overland journeys. Leslie, now the mother of four, gives heartfelt acknowlegment to the writing group, Tuesdays With Story, who critiqued and directed her in writing this novel. Tuesdays With Story meets at Barnes & Noble in Madison, Wi. each Tuesday of the month. Submitted by Millie Mader (a member of Tuesdays With Story)
LauraFabiani More than 1 year ago
Leslie Albrecht Huber has the talent for making history come alive. Her non-fiction book The Journey Takers is definitely not a dry account of her ancestors but an appealing narrative that blends her own life with that of her past relatives, making this book feel like a novel. It was a real pleasure to read, the pages turning quickly as I was transported into the arduous, interesting, and exciting lives of common people who became immigrants and started a new life in a strange and hard land. It made me stop and think of my own ancestors and parents. The book is fascinating because it is filled with facts about the time period and country of the people she wrote about. I learned many new things reading it, among them what tedious and hard work the study of genealogy is! Meticulously researched and well written, this book includes extensive notes, family sheets and a bibliography at the end of the book, which I consulted as I read. It aroused in me a healthy curiosity about researching my own ancestors. I understood the author's ardent desire to know more about her ancestors because I feel the same way when I visit my aunts in Italy and ask them to tell me about my grandparents and great-grandparents. But more than just details about her ancestors, Huber's accounts touched me, especially that of Eliza Barret. I loved the author's imagination as her mind could reel back in time and she could picture with her researcher's eye scenes in the lives of her ancestors and what possible decisions their personal conditions led them to make. She traced her roots by travelling to the places where they were born, and walked the streets they once did. By the end of the book, I felt like I also knew these people personally. No doubt about it, the author has created and left a beautiful legacy to her children: the story of their ancestors with the clear message that family and faith are the most important things in a person's life.