The Judas Ride

The Judas Ride

2.5 2
by Peggy Sue Yarber
     
 

An unwed (and unwanted) teen pregnancy with two possible fathers. Abusive relationships. Drug and alcohol addiction. Rape and molestation. The struggle to understand grace, forgiveness, and free will versus predestination. The Judas Ride hits the road running in the opening pages, where Sonia and Xavier argue explosively about whether Sonia should have their…  See more details below

Overview

An unwed (and unwanted) teen pregnancy with two possible fathers. Abusive relationships. Drug and alcohol addiction. Rape and molestation. The struggle to understand grace, forgiveness, and free will versus predestination. The Judas Ride hits the road running in the opening pages, where Sonia and Xavier argue explosively about whether Sonia should have their unborn child and about who the father is: Xavier, a struggling Christian, or Vader, an abusive and abused drug dealer. As the pages turn, readers continue to meet a hodgepodge of troubled teens and eclectic characters, including Pastor Manny, a quirky immigrant pastor infatuated with John Wayne. Pastor Manny desires to help the tortured souls in his community but finds that it takes more than unconditional love to reach them. Secrets literally kill in The Judas Ride, an edgy, in-your-your face Christian novel that boldly explores the struggles of modern-day young people.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607998013
Publisher:
Tate Publishing
Publication date:
12/08/2009
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.50(d)

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The Judas Ride 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
In Peggy Sue Yarber's latest novel, The Judas Ride, the lives of several out-of-control teens come to an explosive end that will captivate readers and keep pages turning. Writing about problems that are very real and face many teens today, Yarber doesn't sugar coat what can happen when a person refuses to take responsibility for their own actions. Sonia is a self-absorbed teen who is pregnant and is too immature to accept responsibility for her predicament. She hates what the baby growing inside her is doing to her once beautiful, slim body. She also torments the two possible fathers, Xavier and Vader. Xavier is determined to help Sonia and build a respectable life for her and their unborn child. Vader is a far more loathsome individual who abuses Sonia, both physically and verbally. Vader's younger brother Frankie offers a glimmer of hope, but like the others, he is tormented by secrets from his past. With the exception of Xavier, the only other truly redeeming character in The Judas Ride is Pastor Manny, a Chinese immigrant who believes that he can save the lost teens through a relationship with God. Vader has a lot of pent up anger and when not taking it out on Sonia by hitting her, he takes it out on others, including Xavier. Assisting Vader is Bugger, a member of the trouble-making gang who is happy to beat up Xavier and leave the young man for dead at Vader's request. Like real life, there are no fairytale endings for the characters in The Judas Ride. Without giving the ending away, not all teens in this story are redeemed, nor do they find their way out of a life of despair. This is a hard look at living on the fringes, a place where parents, if they're even present, are not supportive and are too busy trying to claw out of their own holes of hopelessness. Billed as a Christian novel, there are numerous references to God and discussions between Pastor Manny and the teens he is trying to save. The youth frequently disparage God, such as when Vader tells Manny, "There is no God, and there's nothing fair in the world. There's nothing but pain and heartache." But Manny doesn't give up on his flock and several interesting talks about what God can do to help the forlorn teens ensue. It must be noted that there are numerous typos and grammatical errors in The Judas Ride that hamper the flow of the story - 'Vader asked questions, and all she has to do was say yes and everything would be fine.' (pg. 33) Having an editor clean up the text would greatly enhance the reading of this book. Quill says: A harsh look at teens who struggle with their inner demons.
Janna6 More than 1 year ago
I hate writing negative reviews. I know the author spent epic time pouring out her heart and soul into this book that is her baby, I don't relish saying anything that will be devastating to her. But as a reviewer I owe it to my readers to tell the truth and point out the good and the bad or how can they trust me when I say something is really worth their time and money to read? This is one of the times that I have to seriously dissuade my readers from wasting time, money or brain cells on this book. Starting out on a positive note... I like the cover of this book, and even the title. For a small publisher I was impressed by the presentation of the book. There is also a lot of good character development, quite a few central characters yet I still felt like I was really getting into their heads (almost more than I wanted to). Okay, that is about where the good ends. Rarely do I read a "Christian" book that leaves me with the sense of wishing I could get my precious hours back that I spent reading it. That leaves me wishing I could take a shower and wash it away. This book did just that. I kept thinking that there would be some redeeming factors by the end that would make it all worthwhile - but no, instead there are tons of funerals (which was repeatedly spelled wrong by the way) whether by suicide, murder, fire or more suicide. Really? The pastor in the story is losing his faith by the end, for a long time I couldn't even figure out why it was called a Christian book. Then some of the characters started debating theology quite a bit - but that doesn't make it Christian. I look for God's redemption, His grace and mercy to shine through and bring hope... just because the baby born is named Mercy Grace does not mean God's grace and mercy have been exhibited to the reader. This was the darkest, vilest book I've ever read. I understand that the author was going for "realism", "edginess" and "grit". But that doesn't mean you have to take every evil thing that has ever happened to someone and roll them all into one book (molestation, rape, murder, physical abuse, mental abuse, drug and alcohol addiction, premarital sex, unwanted pregnancy, abortion, and the list goes on...) This is supposed to represent the struggles of youth today, I may be naive but I don't know one single teen that is going through all those things. I do know that no book is written for everyone and I am convinced that this book was not written for me... I just haven't figured out who it was written for. I have 2 copies of this book and I was going to give them away, but that is before I read it. I can not in good conscience pass them on to other readers. The odd thing is that I read Peggy's book "Tare" and didn't think it was awful, it was kind of dark at the end, and didn't have the closure I was looking for but it wasn't anything like this book.