The Jumping Tree [NOOK Book]

Overview

These lively stories follow Rey Castaneda from sixth through eighth grade in Nuevo Penitas, Texas. One side of Rey's family lives nearby in Mexico, the other half in Texas, and Rey fits in on both sides of the border. In Nuevo Penitas, he enjoys fooling around with his pals in the barrio; at school, he's one of the "A list" kids.

As Rey begins to cross the border from childhood into manhood, he turns from jokes and games to sense the meaning ...
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The Jumping Tree

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Overview

These lively stories follow Rey Castaneda from sixth through eighth grade in Nuevo Penitas, Texas. One side of Rey's family lives nearby in Mexico, the other half in Texas, and Rey fits in on both sides of the border. In Nuevo Penitas, he enjoys fooling around with his pals in the barrio; at school, he's one of the "A list" kids.

As Rey begins to cross the border from childhood into manhood, he turns from jokes and games to sense the meaning of work, love, poverty, and grief, and what it means to be a proud Chicano-moments that sometimes propel him to show feelings un hombre should never express. It's a new territory where Rey longs to follow the example his hardworking, loving father has set for him.

From the Hardcover edition.

Rey, a Mexican American living with his close-knit family in a Texas town near the Mexican border, describes his transition from boy to young man.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-A lively novel told through vignettes about growing up in Nuevo Pe-itas, TX. American-born Rey and his loving family maintain close ties with their Mexican relatives, who live "a stone's throw" away across the border, yet have very different opportunities. Rey's family, though poor, struggles and survives through their kind and honest efforts, religious beliefs, and hard work. Just entering adolescence, Rey yearns to be a man like his father, uncles, and older male cousins. The boys of the barrio play marbles and "king of the mountain," climb trees, and collect cigarette butts. The title comes from one of the boys' challenges: to jump from the upper branches of a mammoth mesquite to another without falling. Unfortunately, Rey is the youngest and his legs are short. Predictably, he falls, and he ends up with a broken wrist. The writing is engaging and accessible, with Spanish-language phrases and names smoothly integrated throughout. Loosely tied together, the chapters create a cohesive whole. Rey is an appealing protagonist who will speak to early adolescents. Salda-a draws extended family together and binds one boy's growth into manhood with real emotion and believable events.-Gail Richmond, San Diego Unified Schools, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
From a series of vivid vignettes of warmly remembered childhood experiences, Saldaña has fashioned a memorable first novel. Young Rey grows up in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, part of a loving family with strong ties across the border in Mexico, where there are frequent visits to grandparents, aunts, and uncles. For the most part, life is good, despite threatening poverty and occasional violence. Each chapter stands alone as a short story, but reading them in succession adds depth and resonance to each. During his middle-school years Rey struggles with what it means to grow up to be a man, an American, and a Chicano. He does well in school, unlike his friend Chuy, who ends up in jail. In "The Jumping Tree" chapter, Rey breaks his wrist by jumping from a huge mesquite tree in response to a dare from his cousins, then wears his cast as a badge of courage. Spanish words and phrases are sprinkled throughout, but most are understandable from the context. Saldaña's work is very much in the tradition of such groundbreaking achievements as Parrot in the Oven (1996) by Victor Martinez and The Circuit (1999) by Francisco Jimenez, although his world is not quite so harsh. The warmth of family ties, especially Rey's love and respect for his father, is strong, and there is reason to hope that Rey will succeed in creating a life for himself that bridges the two cultures to which he belongs. (Fiction 10-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307557216
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/23/2009
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 925,733
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

René Saldaña, Jr, is a former middle school and high school English teacher. He is now in the doctoral program in creative writing at Georgia State University. This is his first novel.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

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2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2013

    Good Book

    It's a good book even though some parts are hard to understand

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2005

    Only two stars because...

    It is only worth it if you can relate to the Hispanic culture if not, you will not really be interest at all in this book... I read it and I am not Hispanic, definately was not crazy about this book. I found it to be a disapointment. Save yourself from disapointment!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2005

    Good for readers interested in the Hispanic culture

    The thing that I like about the book is that it has to do with the hispanic culture. It kind of relates to my hispanic life and what kind of traditions we do. The things that the kids do for fun in the book I have seen a lot by my neighborhood. I recommend this book to any person that would like to know about the hispanic culture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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